chinaculture <![CDATA[Retrospective on Silk Road in New Zealand photo show]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/28/content_1476367.htm

The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

To celebrate Chinese New Year, the China Cultural Center in Wellington cooperated with the government of Kucha in China's Xinjiang Uyghur autonomous region and launched two photo exhibitions about the historical heritage of Kucha city.

With 70 photographs, the exhibits covers a wide range of Kucha's local history, including the Buddhist monastery, the beacon tower dating back to the ancient Silk Road, forests of Euphrates poplar trees and the unique Yardang landforms.


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

"Next time I'm in China, l want to visit these treasured historic sites and imagine the fascinating stories about the monk Xuanzang and the ancient Silk Road," said Micheal Stephens, honorary chairman of the New Zealand Film Festival in China.

"These photos showcase the extraordinary landforms in Xinjiang," said photographer Simon Moore. "To any photography enthusiast, Xinjiang is a must-see destination. I'd very much like to view the resilient Euphrates poplar thriving in the desert."

"Images transcend languages," said Guo Zongguang, director of the China Cultural Center in Wellington. "This exhibition opens a window for people in New Zealand to experience the marvelous culture in Xinjiang."


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-28 14:05:22
<![CDATA[French artists sing 'Together' to support Wuhan]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/28/content_1476368.htm

As Victor Hugo once said, "Music expresses that which cannot be put into words, and that which cannot remains silent."

Musicals from France have enjoyed popularity in China ever since French performing artists sang at Shanghai Culture Square in 2017. With hit productions including Notre Dame de Paris and Mozart L'Opera Rock, Chinese audiences have resonated with and been touched by French vocal performances.

Because of the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic, we cannot step foot into theaters to experience art firsthand. To keep the music going and as a show of support to Wuhan, French musical artist Laurent Bàn gathered a star-studded cast, 40 of the country's most celebrated artists, to perform a song titled Together. "We look up at the same night sky, please don't give up hope, because we are together!" Bàn says.

The fog will lift, and the sun is bound to rise again. Together, we can win this fight.

Video provided by Joyway

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2020-02-28 14:10:30
<![CDATA[Sudan college supports China through cutural exhibition]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/27/content_1476256.htm  

Students hold handwritten Chinese slogans to support China in the battle against the novel coronavirus on Feb 25, 2020. Teachers and students of Chinese at the University of Khartoum in Sudan support epidemic-stricken China through an exhibition featuring Chinese culture. [Photo/Xinhua]


Teachers and students of Chinese at the University of Khartoum in Sudan support epidemic-stricken China through an exhibition featuring Chinese culture,Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-27 10:00:18
<![CDATA[TCM widely applied in treating infected patients]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/26/content_1476254.htm

Yan Liqiong, a pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) produces doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. TCM has been widely applied in treating infected patients as it has proved effective in improving the cure rate. Since the epidemic outbreak, the time-honored treatment has been applied in treating over 60,000 confirmed cases of the infection in China. [Photo/Xinhua]


A pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) arranges doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Leng Caixia (L), a pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), prepares herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prepares herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Zhou Lei, a pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), prepares herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Pharmacists of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prepare herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-26 16:47:26
<![CDATA[Exhibition introduces Chinese landscape in Sydney]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/26/content_1476208.htm

The Beautiful China photo exhibition is being held at the China Cultural Center in Sydney until March 6. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A photo exhibition, Beautiful China, which showcases China's natural and cultural landscape, opened at the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Feb 12.

Consisting of 32 artworks celebrating the abundant heritage all around China, the display was organized by the China Cultural Center and the China tourism office, both in Sydney.

"China has an enormous amount of tourism resources," said Xiao Xiayong, director of the China Cultural Center in Sydney. "We host this exhibit to introduce China's scenic beauty and cultural charm to the Australian public."

The Beautiful China photo exhibition is being held at the China Cultural Center in Sydney until March 6. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

All photos on display are unretouched, emphasizing the natural subjects without any photo-revising software. Visitors are able to view many magnificent Chinese landmarks, such as the Great Wall, Mogao Grottoes, Taishan Mountain and Potala Palace.

The exhibition will run through March 6.

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2020-02-26 15:55:37
<![CDATA[Stunning snow scenery captured in photos]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/26/content_1476174.htm

The Yellow River surrounded by snow, by Mei Sheng. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]

A series of landscape photographs taken by Mei Sheng portraying some stunning snow scenery has drawn many views online. "I want to ease people's minds and moods during the current epidemic through these photos, which show the pure beauty of nature, said Mei. "As medical expert Wang Fusheng once said in an interview, 'A good mood offers strong immunity.'" He believes that this kind of incredible beauty can touch others, give people power and also inspire them to reconsider the relationship between nature and humans.

Photographer Mei Sheng is an imaging specialist for world heritage and has won the Golden Statue Award for China Photography.


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A waterfall surrounded by snow. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


Birds on the snow. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


Trees covered with snow. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]

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2020-02-26 10:39:24
<![CDATA[Honey glazed lotus root with jujube and osmanthus]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/25/content_1476104.htm

Ingredients

1 pc Lotus Root (Approx. 400g)

100g Glutinous Rice

10 Pitted Red Jujubes

3/4 Slab of Raw Cane Sugar

800ml Water

Osmanthus Syrup

1 Tbsp Dried Osmanthus

2 Tbsps Honey

Honey glazed lotus root with jujube and osmanthus, a dish from Grace Choy's book Choy Choy Kitchen.

 

Instructions

1.Rinse the Lotus Root. Trim off and Reserve the Tips.

2.Soak the Jujube in Water for 15 mins and set aside.

3.Soak the Glutinous Rice in Water for 3 to 4 hours and set aside.

4.Soak the Dried Osmanthus in Water for 5 mins.

5.Stuff the Lotus Root with Glutinous Rice with the help of a Chopstick. When done, Put the Tips Back in Place and Secure with Toothpicks.

6.Bring a Pot of Water to a Boil on High Heat. When the Water Boils, add the Jujubes and Cane Sugar. Stir Briefly then add the Lotus Root and Cook on High Heat for 45 mins.

6.1. Reduce Heat to Medium and Cook for another 30 mins. Turn off Heat and Let Rest Covered for 15 mins.

7. When Done, put the Lotus Root into Cold Water to Cool down for 10 mins.

8. After cool down, Take out the Toothpicks and Peel it. Cut into 2 cm Slices.

9.To prepare the Osmanthus Syrup, Add approx. 1 bowl of the Jujube Soup to a Pan and turn on High Heat. Add the Osmanthus and Honey, Stir Constantly until thoroughly Mixed then Turn Off Heat.

10. Finally Pour the Hot Syrup on the Lotus Root Slices and serve. Enjoy!

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2020-02-25 14:13:54
<![CDATA[Auckland Girls' Choir sends support through song]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/25/content_1476103.htm

Together With You, a bilingual song in Chinese and English, was composed and recorded by New Zealand's Auckland Girls' Choir to deliver messages of love and support to epidemic-stricken China.

Leonie Lawson, aged 89, is the founder of the choir and wrote the English lyrics of the song. "There was a strong feeling amongst the girls, they want to help Wuhan. I know the Chinese people will have a very good fighting spirit when they face something difficult. So I use that aspect in writing and made a lively tune that had power behind it", Lawson said in an interview.

From the genesis of the idea to final recording, it took four days for the Auckland Girls' Choir to complete the heartwarming song, finishing on Feb 14 ?Valentine’s Day.

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2020-02-25 14:04:44
<![CDATA[Bangladeshis, global artists express support for China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/24/content_1476025.htm

Last Friday, tens of thousands of people in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka paid tribute to the country's language movement activists who sacrificed their lives on that day in 1952. Artists from more than 10 countries participated in the memorial event and expressed their support for the current battle in China against the novel coronavirus.

Artists and cultural workers show support to China on International Mother Language Day in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Feb 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Teachers from the local Confucius Institute and Chinese Embassy in Bangladesh performed the Bengalese song Ami Bangla Gaan Gaai and Chinese song Love Will Triumph to cheer on the heroes fighting on the front lines of the nationwide battle against the outbreak.

Students from Bangladesh show support to China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Since the beginning of 2020, Bengalis from all circles including arts, education, religion, media and sports, have voiced their support for the Chinese people. Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina wrote in a letter to China the thoughts of her country's people will always be with China, and that they will overcome this challenge together.

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2020-02-24 14:24:57
<![CDATA[Cast members of film 'Minamata' attend photocall at Berlin film festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/22/content_1475994.htm

Author Aileen Mioko Smith of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Johnny Depp of film "Minamata" attends a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Johnny Depp of film "Minamata" attends a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Johnny Depp of film "Minamata" attends a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Director, producer and screenwriter Andrew Levitas of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Bill Naghy of film "Minamata" poses for photos after a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actress Akiko Iwase of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actress Minami of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Cast members of film "Minamata" attend a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-22 09:52:19
<![CDATA[Local heroes]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/22/content_1475992.htm

People's Liberation Army soldiers patrol Tian'anmen Square in Beijing. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]

The novel coronavirus outbreak has temporarily put a halt to normal, bustling city life. Silence now marks the Chinese capital as companies offer their employees a variety of ways to resume production, including chartered transportation service for daily commuters to curb the spread of the epidemic, while many are provided with a choice to work at home.

However, delivery riders still brave the wind with their electric scooters to make sure those who work at home can get their meals and food supplies.


Staff members disinfect the block at Sanlitun Soho. [Photo by Zhang Wei/China Daily]

Due to the severity of the epidemic, the entrances of many communities are locked. Now, the goods are placed in front of the entrance, waiting to be picked up. Staff members measure the temperature of each visitor.

Some fresh produce distributors have ramped up scheduled minivan support to provide daily necessities outside the community entrance. To avoid close people-to - people contact, delivering to the customer's door is prohibited.


Staff members disinfect a road outside the National Stadium. [Photo by Wei Xiaohao/China Daily]

Sanitation workers toil away on the roads to keep things tidy. Cleaning workers disinfect the roads and business areas while wearing masks and gloves as a precaution against the virus.

The Beijing subway and bus operators have increased the frequency of buses and subway trains, limited passenger numbers during rush hours and enhanced disinfection.

These measures will curb the transmission of the virus that might spread during the travel season and guarantee the safety of both workers and their workplaces.


Cleaning workers disinfect a platform at China World Mall in Beijing. [Photo by Wei Xiaohao/China Daily]


A delivery rider braves the snow with his electric scooter in Beijing's Wangjing area. [Photo by Wang Zhuangfei/China Daily]


Sanitation workers clean the road at Tian'anmen Square in Beijing. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]


Few people are seen at Dashilar, Qianmen Street. [Photo by Feng Yongbin/China Daily]


Police officers patrol the square at Beijing Railway Station. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]

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2020-02-22 09:29:41
<![CDATA[Nature photographer dedicates life to conservation]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/21/content_1475960.htm

Green peacock, Yunnan province, 2018 [Photo/Wild China Film]

The public has placed a renewed focus on wildlife protection after the novel coronavirus outbreak.

Passionate about wildlife, Xi Zhinong, founder of Wild China Film, captured some of the best photos taken of one of the most beautiful birds in China ?the green peacock ?20 years ago in Lancang River Basin in Yunnan province. Now, fewer than 500 of the birds may still exist.

Xi has photographed countless rare wild animals. He says good wildlife work can cut through to people's hearts, and that is the power of nature.


Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys, Yunnan province, 1995 [Photo/Wild China Film]

In 1995 he filmed the documentary Mystery of the Yunnan Snub-Nosed Monkey. It was the first time humans had recorded the activities of the monkeys on film. Xi started work on another documentary, Mystery Monkeys of Shangri-La, in 2012.

In 1997 he entered Hoh Xil Nature Reserve in Qinghai and took direct photographic evidence Tibetan antelopes had been poached.


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2010 [Photo/Wild China Film]

The Chinese Wildlife Photography Training Camp Xi set up 15 years ago has focused on cultivating more wildlife photographers to make the best nature movies in China.

There is more to photography than just taking pictures, Xi said. "Photography is a tool, a powerful weapon for nature conservation."

Xi and his wife Shi Lihong make 50 to 60 public speeches a year around the globe on average to promote their causes.


Green peacock, Yunnan province, 2018 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys, Yunnan province, 2019 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Green peacock, Yunnan province, 2017 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkey, Yunnan province, 2019 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkey, Yunnan province, 2006 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys, Yunnan province, 2002 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2006 [Photo/Wild China Film]


A newly born Tibetan antelope in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2000 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2006 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2011 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkey, Yunnan province, 2019 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Skulls of Tibetan antelopes, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, 1998 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Xi Zhinong, founder of Wild China Film,[Photo/Wild China Film]


Xi Zhinong, founder of Wild China Film [Photo/Wild China Film]

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2020-02-21 15:53:50
<![CDATA[Berklee students compose song to honor frontline medical workers]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/21/content_1475892.htm

Four Chinese students studying at the Berklee College of Music in Boston released a song, Waiting for Your Return, on Friday to pay tribute to medical workers fighting in the front line of the nationwide battle against the coronavirus outbreak.

Chinese students studying at the Berklee College of Music in Boston released a song, Waiting for Your Return, on Feb 14, 2020 to pay tribute to medical workers fighting in the front line of the nationwide battle against the coronavirus outbreak. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The song’s video has so far logged over 900,000 views since it was posted on China’s Twitter-like social media app Weibo, via China Daily’s official Weibo account on Sunday. “Our hearts are with our motherland wherever we are,?read one comment under the video, among hundreds of others.

In addition, Chinese students at Berklee are planning to partner with students from other universities in Boston and hold charity concerts to raise money for epidemic-stricken areas. Their plan is endorsed by the college, which will offer on-campus venues for the concerts.

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2020-02-21 10:34:23
<![CDATA[Braised pork ribs with sea cucumber]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/20/content_1475846.htm

1.Pork ribs : 600 grams

2.Frozen sea cucumber : 8 pcs

(approx. 60 grams each)

3.Dried mushroom : 10 pcs (600 ml hot water to soak)

4.Garlic dice: 1 Tbsp

5.Ginger slices :2 pcs

6.Star anise :2 pcs

7.Spring onion dice: 1 Tbsp

8.Cooking oil :2 Tbsp

9.Shaoxing wine :1 Tbsp

Seasonings:

1.Light soy sauce (生抽): 2 Tbsp

2.Oyster sauce: 3 Tbsp

3.Rock sugar: 2 pcs

4.Salt: 1 tsp

Braised Pork ribs with sea cucumber, a dish from Grace Choy's book Choy Choy Kitchen.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Preparations and Steps:

1.Rinse mushroom, soak in hot water for at least 2 hours, cut the stems, keep mushroom water ( do not throw it away);

2. Defrost sea cucumber in cold water, running water to rinse out the sands and scrape away the intestine, then cut into pcs;

3. Wash Pork ribs, soak in hot water for 5 mins, then running water to rinse out the bloody, drain it, kitchen towel to pat it dry;

4. Add 2 Tbsp oil into the pot, add ginger, garlic, turn high heat, add pork ribs, Shaoxing wine, light soy sauce, oyster sauce, fast stir fry it for 2 mins, turn off the heat, pick up the pork ribs, ginger and garlic, set aside;

Braised Pork ribs with sea cucumber. [Photo by Grace Choy/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

5.Use same pot, add mushroom, rock sugars,high heat to stir fry for 2 mins, add mushroom water(water level should over mushroom, (add hot water if necessary), close lid to cook for 10 mins, turn to medium heat to cook for another 20 mins;

6.30 mins later, open lid, add pork ribs, ginger and garlic (add hot water if necessary), stir it, close lid, continue to cook for 20 mins;

7. 20 mins later, add sea cucumber, stir it, cook for 15 mins;

8. Finally, add salt and stir it, springkle spring onion and serve! Enjoy!

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2020-02-20 13:58:20
<![CDATA[Musicians from the world are 'together' with China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/19/content_1475791.htm

Musicians from 19 countries collaborated to create this song Together: Wuhan Stay Strong.

Music has no borders, neither does love.

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2020-02-19 11:55:57
<![CDATA[Adapted Michael Jackson song heartens Chinese amid epidemic fight]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/19/content_1475756.htm

Last week, a music video to show worldwide support for China's efforts against the COVID-19 went viral on Chinese social media.

The song, China, You Are Not Alone, was adapted from a song by Michael Jackson. All the lead singers in the video are from Cuba while the other participants are of various nationalities.

They recorded audio and video materials with their mobile phones and other tools from their homes in different cities, and then sent them to Shenzhen Meifeiya Culture Communication Co. Ltd, where the video was finally compiled and finished.

Annie Xu, the founder of the company from China, initiated the creation of the production.

"At first, we planned to donate money, but we didn't know how to donate, and it was not much actually. So we decided to use what we are good at to contribute our part ?music. Everyone agreed and we started to work on it," Xu said.

The idea was backed up by the employees, a group of expat musicians who live in China.

"We are surprised that the video was so much liked. Many people sent messages to us to show appreciation," Xu told People's Daily on Monday. "It's our simple wish that the music can bring people some warmth and encouragement."

The musicians who took part in the video's making were also happy to do something meaningful at this particular time. "They all study and work in China, which they take it as their second home," Xu said.

Daymara Viñals Acosta, from Cuba, a lead singer in the video who lives in Guangzhou, said she is so sad that many people in China are suffering from the epidemic and China is having a bad time.

"[We hope] to give encouragement to the Chinese people, that they know they are not alone, even going through this difficult moment, the world supports them," Acosta told People's Daily via WeChat on Sunday.

She is impressed by the nation's concerted efforts in fighting against the virus and is confident in the victory. "It is well controlled, everywhere you take the temperature," she said. "I think that Chinese doctors have a lot of capacity and experience and have everything under control."

Xu said they are preparing another song for those people who are separated from their loved ones due to the epidemic.

Video: People's Daily Online

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2020-02-19 09:16:21
<![CDATA[Wuhan,be strong: Support from artists at LA Art Show]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/18/content_1475749.htm

Artists expressed their support to Chinese people in battle against coronavirus outbreak at the Los Angeles Art Show, Los Angeles, the US, Feb 5-9. 

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2020-02-18 16:14:15
<![CDATA[Tsinghua students, alums join charity effort]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/18/content_1475718.htm

A charity program titled Supply Fundraiser was started by graduates of Tsinghua University to seek medical supplies from around the world for frontline medical workers by leveraging their skills in global networking.

At present, the program has gathered more than 100 Tsinghua students and alumni from more than 10 countries to cover information collection and translation work in the supply acquisition process.

Mekhri Aliev, a Russian graduate from Tsinghua University now working at Moscow State University, has spared no effort to launch and run the program.

"I was very upset when I heard the news about the outbreak of novel coronavirus. I am very grateful for my time studying at Tsinghua. That is why, despite the fact we are relatively safe in our own countries, I found it is my duty to help in the hour of need," he said.

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2020-02-18 13:23:45
<![CDATA[Calligraphy exhibit in Japan highlights support for China during outbreak]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/18/content_1475717.htm

On Feb 10, a Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition was unveiled at the China Cultural Center in Tokyo.

 

Luo Yuquan, second from left, director of the China Cultural Center in Tokyo, poses with Japanese guests holding a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong? at the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition in Tokyo. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, the opening ceremony and speech sessions for the event were cancelled.

However, many Japanese dignitaries in politics and culture visited the exhibition, during which they filmed videos and created calligraphic work to show solidarity with China, especially people in Wuhan, epicenter of the outbreak.

Japanese guests to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition held in Tokyo pose with a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Wuhan Bisheng? meaning “Wuhan is sure to prevail? [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

In celebration of the 120th anniversary of the birth of Chinese calligrapher Wang Quchang, hailed as the contemporary Wang Xizhi, an ancient calligrapher in the Jin dynasty (265-420), the show features 65 artworks created by 42 Chinese and Japanese calligraphers, including Wang and his disciples, Su Shishu, president of the China Calligraphers Association, and Fukuda Tatsuo, member of the Japanese House of Representatives.

Japanese guests to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition held in Tokyo pose with a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong? [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The exhibit runs through Feb 20.

A Japanese guest to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition held in Tokyo creates a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong? [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

Guests to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition at the China Cultural Center in Tokyo pose holding a calligraphic work with characters showing support for China, especially people in Wuhan, the epicenter of the epidemic. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-02-18 11:12:45
<![CDATA[Students from Tokyo Shaolin boxing class cheer for China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/18/content_1475722.htm

Students at a Shaolin boxing class at the China Cultural Center in Tokyo cheered for Chinese people in fight against the epidemic on Feb 10.

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2020-02-18 14:24:36
<![CDATA[Sandpainting depicts incredible story of pregnant women giving birth amid outbreak]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/18/content_1475671.htm

This sandpainting depicts the true story of several pregnant women diagnosed with the COVID-19 pneumonia, who safely gave birth thanks to the tireless efforts of hardworking medical staff. The winter is cold and harsh because of the outbreak. But the newborn babies have brought a feeling of warmth and hope to all of us.

Video: People's Daily Online

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2020-02-18 09:21:14
<![CDATA[New Zealand kite festival cheers for China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/17/content_1475646.htm

The Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9 on the Otaki Beach in Wellington, New Zealand.

A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English attracted many visitors?eyes.

It’s the second year that Chinese kites have been featured in the festival, they attracted the attention and affection of viewers. Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas and Peking Opera masks soaring high in the sky fit harmoniously with those in the shapes of different ocean fish.

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2020-02-17 14:55:18
<![CDATA[Celebrating in Harmony and Joy: Chinese New Year Photo Exhibition]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/16/content_1475571.htm












 














































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2020-02-16 17:30:17
<![CDATA[Musicians cheer for China at New Zealand music festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/14/content_1475545.htm

An artist at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

At the annual Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival held at Harcourt Park in Wellington, New Zealand, on Feb 8-9, the host Cameron Kapua-Morrell showed his great concern for the Chinese people in the fight against the epidemic along with participating musicians and audience members.

The festival, featuring about 30 artists and performing groups with two days, has been held since 2014.

And this is the first time the China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited.

Music teachers from the center -- Sun Yanshu, Kong Jingyuan and Zuo Ruoyan -- performed a series of classic Chinese and Western songs with bamboo flute, pipa (a four-stringed Chinese instrument) and guzheng (Chinese zither).

As beautiful music can speak for itself, Guo Zongguang, the director of the cultural center, said traditional Chinese music and musical instruments were widely welcomed by the local people at the music festival. He expressed the willingness to find more ways to promote Chinese music in New Zealand.


A Chinese performer plays the guzheng at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Artists at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


An artist at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


A Chinese performer plays the bamboo flute at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Artists at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


A Chinese performer plays the pipa at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Artists at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Audience members at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Audience members at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-14 11:54:11
<![CDATA[More young Yemenis learn Chinese for better future]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/14/content_1475519.htm

Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches a student the Chinese language at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

SANAA -- A Chinese song echoed in a classroom in Sanaa, the capital of war-torn Yemen, where around 20 Chinese-learning schoolchildren were singing.

"I love to learn the Chinese language because it is very nice, important and I want to travel to China to complete my studies there," Karim al-Areqi, a student of the private Languages Model School in Sanaa, told Xinhua.

Teacher Mohammed al-Ansi, who studied the language in China and received a university degree, stressed the importance of learning the Chinese language.

"It is the language of the future and it is necessary for all generations to benefit from the tremendous scientific, industrial and economic development in China," he said.


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi writes on a board as he teaches students the Chinese language at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Like many other private elementary and secondary schools in Yemen, the Chinese language is an essential part of the Languages Model School's curriculum, where the students study Chinese as actively as math and other science subjects.

Beside teaching in the school, al-Ansi also gives private lessons to businessmen, merchants, employees and others in Sanaa.

"In teaching the Chinese language, I succeeded in educating many people through an easy curriculum and in a simple and clear way that fits everyone," al-Ansi said proudly, stressing that teaching Chinese has definitely changed his life.


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches students how to write the Chinese characters at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Al-Ansi hopes that Yemen and China will cooperate to establish centers and institutes for teaching the Chinese language in Yemen so that many young people can learn.

"I hope that a branch of the Confucius Institute could be established in Yemen to teach the language and spread the Chinese culture to many students and researchers who are interested in learning the Chinese culture and language," he said.

Many people in Yemen see that learning a foreign language may open a path of hope to a new life, such as getting a better job, increasing income and paving the way to a bright future in the country that has suffered from civil war for nearly five years.


Student learn to write the Chinese characters during a lesson at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Despite the bitterness of the conflict, the young Yemeni people are still actively engaged in their society, aspiring to permanent peace and development for their war-ravaged country.

Even before the fighting broke out in early 2015 between the Saudi-backed government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi and Iran-backed Houthi rebel group, Yemen was one of the poorest countries in the Arab world.

The war has left thousands of civilians dead and more than 3 million internally displaced. Its impact on the country's infrastructure has been devastating, with major overland routes and airports severely damaged.


A student learns the Chinese language during a lesson at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi writes on a board as he teaches students the Chinese language at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches as a student writes the Chinese characters at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches students the Chinese language during a lesson at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-14 09:21:35
<![CDATA[Chinese music instruments displayed in Moscow, Russia]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/14/content_1475517.htm

A visitor looks at a traditional slavic music instrument gusli in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


Visitors look at a traditional slavic music instrument gusli in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


A Chinese music instrument Guqin is seen on display in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


A traditional slavic music instrument gusli is seen on display in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


A traditional slavic music instrument gusli is seen on display in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-02-14 09:17:05
<![CDATA[Kite cheering for China soars high in New Zealand]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/14/content_1475515.htm

A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English, soars high in the sky at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English, stole the show at the Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9 on the Otaki Beach in Wellington, New Zealand.

The kite, made by local Chinese communities under the initiative of the Chinese Cultural Center in Wellington, shows the strong confidence of Chinese people around the world that the nation will prevail over the coronavirus outbreak that is disrupting the country.


A panda-shaped Chinese kite is featured at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Now in its eighth edition, the Otaki Kite Festival is an annual international event, attracting about 22,ooo contestants and visitors from around the world over this year’s two-day event.

Though it’s only the second year that Chinese kites have been featured in the festival, they attracted the attention and affection of viewers. Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas and Peking Opera masks soaring high in the sky fit harmoniously with those in the shapes of different ocean fish.


A silver and purple kite stands out against the blue sky at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


A blue heart-shaped kite at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas and Peking Opera masks soar at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Fish-shaped kites float above the beach at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas are among those featured at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English, soars high in the sky at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

 

 

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2020-02-14 05:00:00
<![CDATA[Orchestra piece for Wuhan medics]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/13/content_1475448.htm

Because of the coronavirus outbreak, this year was the first time that violinist Zhang Qin hadn't returned to her hometown, Wuhan, Hubei province, for a reunion with her family over Spring Festival.

Zhang, who graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music in the Chinese capital and joined the Beijing Symphony Orchestra in 1999, is now expressing her solidarity with her hometown through music.

The Beijing Symphony Orchestra performs under the baton of Li Biao in a previous concert. [Photo provided to China Daily]

She and 11 fellow musicians from the orchestra played English composer Edward Elgar's piece, Salut d'Amour, under the baton of principal resident conductor, Li Biao, from their homes, and the joint recording was released online on Feb 5.

"It's the first time that our musicians recorded a piece in this way. We wanted to dedicate our performance to the doctors, nurses and people working on the front lines of the battle against the virus," says Li, adding that the piece, originally written for Elgar's wife, was chosen because of its soothing melody and ability to convey good wishes.

The orchestra's musicians participated in the recording from their homes, which are located in different parts of the Chinese mainland and Taipei.

Playing from their homes, 12 musicians from the orchestra perform for an online video to show their support for Wuhan's fight against the virus. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"It may not be a perfect performance, because we couldn't play together face-to-face like we usually do. However, with this different musical experience, we wanted to encourage and comfort people," says Dong Linsong, a violist of the orchestra.

The Beijing Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1977. Its plan to launch its 2020 season of performances has been postponed due to the epidemic. The opening concert was scheduled for Feb 22 at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing, featuring four guest performers from the Berlin Philharmonic, including violinist Alessandro Cappone.

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2020-02-13 07:25:00
<![CDATA[Children from Cambodia donate 5,000 masks to China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/12/content_1475395.htm

Cambodian Sinologist Munyrith Chea launched a mask donation to China at the Cambodian Office of the Yundi Behavior and Health Center. The event soon received about 5,000 masks from 86 local families within 10 days.

These families include children who have recovered from congenital heart disease thanks to the free treatment from the Fuwai Yunnan Cardiovascular Hospital in Kunming, capital city of Yunnan province. Doctors and volunteers from the hospital have gone to poverty-stricken areas in Cambodia on seven trips in the past two years. 86 Cambodian children have also received surgeries in Kunming.

86 Cambodian families donate about 5000 masks at the donation launched by a Cambodian Sinologist Munyrith Chea at the Cambodian Office of the Yundi Behavior and Health Center. [Photo by the Yundi Behavior and Health Center/provided to Chinaculture.org]

One boy, Toutorn, bought 100 masks and brought them to the center after two days?travel from his hometown. Though he is still in recovery, his weight has risen to 34 kilograms from 25. Now, he is able to go back to school.

Luo Zhi, the director of the center, was moved by the boy and his family, as the masks cost Toutom 20 dollars.

“The boy’s mother is the main breadwinner whose salary is less than 100 dollars a month. 20 dollars is not a small expense to the family, yet they didn’t hesitate,?He said.

Toutorn’s mother expressed her sincere thanks to Chinese doctors in a video filmed for the donation.

“I want to repay them. They cured my boy. I hope these masks can help them,?she said.

Cambodian Sinologist Munyrith Chea (second from right) brings the masks donated by 86 Cambodian families to China, Feb 5, 2020. [Photo by the Yundi Behavior and Health Center/provided to Chinaculture.org]

A parcel of carefully wrapped masks came from seven-year-old Ban Chunsocheata, who brought the donation with her mother after a 7-hour journey.

“It is Chinese doctors who saved my child,?the child’s mother said.

Many Cambodian families also cheered Chinese people on in the fight against the coronavirus outbreak through videos.

“We are very thankful to the Chinese doctors, as my child received pretty good treatment in the hospital in Yunnan. Sorry for this epidemic in China. We believe everything will become better,?one of the parents said. 

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2020-02-12 11:49:08
<![CDATA[Children choir of Northern Ireland dedicate song to China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/12/content_1475349.htm

Children of Millburn Primary School Choir from Northern Ireland joined together to perform a Chinese song, Let the World be Full of Love, dedicated to people in China suffering from the coronavirus outbreak.

The song, written by Chinese singer-songwriter Guo Feng, was released in 1986 and performed by over 100 Chinese stars to celebrate the International Year of Peace.

The Chinese-language choir at the school was organized by the Confucius Institute at Ulster University. 16 of the project's teachers are from Hubei province, where the coronavirus outbreak began. The choir consists of 30 students from ages 8 to 13.

The Confucius Institute at the Ulster University was established in 2011 to develop academic, cultural, economic and social ties between Northern Ireland and China.

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2020-02-12 09:40:57
<![CDATA[Argentine scholars send support to Chinese people]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/11/content_1475295.htm

Young Argentine scholars and sinologists have sent their support to the Chinese people in the battle against the novel coronavirus in a video message.

"I know that the Chinese government has taken a series of resolute measures to control the development of the epidemic. I hope that the Chinese people can overcome the epidemic soon," said Ignacio Villagran, director of the Argentina-China Study Center at the University of Buenos Aires. He attended the Visiting Program for Young Sinologists in the Northwestern Chinese city of Xi'an in 2017.

Gonzalo Tordini, chairman of the Argentina-China Association of Former Scholarship Recipients (ADEBAC), said, "As international students who studied and lived in China, we feel sympathetic to the difficulties facing the Chinese people caused by the new coronavirus." He added, "We know the strength of the Chinese people, so we believe that the situation will soon return to normal."

Dafne Esteso, vice-chairman of ADEBAC, said the Argentineans and the Chinese have a long and profound friendship. "We always stand by you."

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2020-02-11 15:03:13
<![CDATA[African artist cheers Chinese people with music]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/11/content_1475279.htm

The outbreak of the new coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV, requires attention, patience and assistance from all members of society. On Feb 9, African dancer Abbe Simon released a song he wrote giving good wishes and support for China.

"Here is a song I wrote for our lovely country China. Just to remind all of us we are victorious, and we will always be! Zhongguo Jia You! You're victorious! And we love you!" Simon said.

Simon, a former lead dancer for a well-known Cameroon hip-hop group, discovered not only inspiration but also a future in China.

In 2008, Simon founded his own dance group -- ABBE Dance -- in Cameroon. With his partner and wife Jiang Keyu, they combine modern dance, hip pop, African drum dance, Tai Chi and qigong techniques into a comprehensive training method.

Early in 2016 they built an art platform, BodyBoulevard, to teach Chinese children African drum and dance. The couple aims to promote African culture and build a bridge between China and Africa.

They have been invited to perform on international stages, including the Beijing Olympics and the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation.

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2020-02-11 14:04:59
<![CDATA[Belgian pianist composes song in solidarity with China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/11/content_1475259.htm

Video source: People's Daily Online

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2020-02-11 09:50:40
<![CDATA[Colombian ambassador extends support to China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/10/content_1475212.htm

Luis D. Monsalve, Colombian ambassador to China, spoke on behalf of the Colombian people, offering support to China in this challenging time.

He expressed great admiration and appreciation toward the doctors, nurses and workers in the virus-stricken region, who have continued to work in such difficult circumstances.

The video was provided by the Colombian Embassy in China.

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2020-02-10 13:31:18
<![CDATA[Thailand enterprise cheers Chinese people in fight against coronavirus]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/10/content_1475198.htm

Seacon Square Group donated about 7,000 disposable masks to China through the China Cultural Center in Bangkok on Feb 7.

Representatives from the China Cultural Center in Bangkok and Seacon Square Group at the donation ceremony in Bangkok, Thailand, Feb 7, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The group representative expressed his condolences to the infected people who died from the disease and wishes the Chinese people conquer the epidemic soon.

Banner in Chinese supporting Chinese people in fight against the virus was featured on LED screens of the Seacon Square, the group’s mall. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Banners in both Chinese and Thai supporting Chinese people in fight against the virus were featured on LED screens of the Seacon Square, the group’s mall.

Banners in both Chinese and Thai supporting Chinese people in fight against the virus were featured on LED screens of the Seacon Square, the group’s mall. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Seacon Square Group is a partner of the center, participating in a 20-day show and sales to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. 

Gu Hongxing (right), director of the China Cultural Center in Bangkok at the donation ceremony in Bangkok, Thailand, Feb 7, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-02-10 11:50:50
<![CDATA[Former Colombian president supports Chinese people in fight against epidemic]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/08/content_1475152.htm

I am former Colombian President Sampel Pisano, a friend of the Chinese people. I give my sincere greetings to the entire Chinese people who are suffering from the epidemic.

Like all stubborn viruses, no matter how difficult, it will eventually be wiped out. Despite the hardships which China has been through in the past, it won and was reborn fresh and new. This time China will win the battle against the virus, too.

The Colombian people are standing closely with their Chinese friends. I'm sure when I visit China next, I will toast and celebrate the virus being defeated completely!

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2020-02-08 16:20:56
<![CDATA[Thailand supports China in fight against virus]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/08/content_1475144.htm

Thai Tourism and Sports Minister Phiphat Ratchakitprakarn expressed his support to the Chinese people in the fight against the novel coronavirus in a video message. "The Thai people always stand by you." He said he hopes the Chinese people could overcome the disease as soon as possible.

In this video, Thai people from different walks of life also send well-wishes.

 

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2020-02-08 09:01:04
<![CDATA[Sinologists around world send support for virus battle]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/07/content_1475130.htm

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus brings together all Chinese, and also people's hearts around the globe. In Egypt, Spain, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia, Australia and many other countries, they pay close attention to the epidemic control, ask after Chinese friends, and donate money and goods to those in dire need.

Recently, diplomats, Sinologists and scholars from overseas expressed their warm regards and support toward people in Wuhan, and other parts around China, through the Chinese Culture Translation and Studies Support Network (CCTSS).

The video was provided by CCTSS.

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2020-02-07 14:20:09
<![CDATA[Young Columbian Sinologist makes video to support virus fight]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/07/content_1475117.htm                          

Young Columbian Sinologist David Castrillón sent his video supporting China in combating the novel coronavirus. He was once involved in the Visiting Program for Young Sinologists started by China’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism, which aims to build a global platform for young Sinologists overseas to conduct research on China.

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2020-02-07 11:21:09
<![CDATA[Intl kids' theater artists make videos to support fight against virus]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/06/content_1475079.htm

Within 48 hours, 61 artists from 13 countries sent their videos supporting China’s ongoing campaign to fight the novel coronavirus via their Chinese partner ?ASK, a Shanghai-based international theater presenter committed to introducing international theater productions for young audiences to China.

Most of the artists showed in their videos the slogan: “Stay strong! We are with you, China!?/p>

ASK planned to introduce top-notch performances to a special venue at the Tianjin Grand Theater since this February, but this had to be postponed due to the outbreak of the epidemic.

The artists have shown strong confidence in China as well as Tianjin in their efforts to combat the virus.

Within the video, Yvette Hardie, president of Assitej, the International Association of Theater for Children and Young People affiliated to UNESCO, took the initiative in responding to the campaign, joined by a large group of artists from leading theater organizations around the world, including the Edinburgh Children’s Festival and Australian Windmill Theater, to name a few.

Shona Reppe, who starred in The Curious Scrapbook of Josephine Bean, a top children’s drama from Britain, said she expects the outbreak of the epidemic will soon be overcome and she is keen to come to China.

Ian Cameron, 73, who started White, also an internationally acclaimed classical piece from Britain, said: “My heart is with you, China.?/p>

Helene Ducharme, director ofElisapee and the Northern Lightsfrom the Canadian troupe Motus, led a group of local friends to shoot the video while she was doing a co-production in Africa, using different languages to encourage China’s efforts to combat the virus.

Tony Mack, chairman of Slingsby, an Australian performance troupe which is renowned for its Emil and the Detectives, said: “The medical workers: You are heroes. Thank you so much for standing on the front line, and you are not only keeping China safe but also the whole world safe!?/p>

The ASK team said it will remain positive and active in connecting with audiences and followers by spreading online content to enhance energy, courage and creativity.

In the past five years, up to 5,500 performances from 19 countries have been introduced across China through 12 ASK studio theaters and its cooperative venues nationwide.

Li Wenyu, general manager of Tianjin Grand Theater, said: “With government subsidies, the theater has introduced high-level international art performance for local citizens and in the future, I will partner with ASK to introduce more children’s theaters.?/p>

 

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2020-02-06 11:07:24
<![CDATA[Mexican children imagine the wonders of China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1475077.htm ]]> 2020-01-31 09:00:00 <![CDATA[The snow kingdom in NE China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/04/content_1475075.htm

A warm welcome from a cold land: Check out China's snow kingdom...

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2020-02-04 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Mauritius President hopeful for more cultural exchange with China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/06/content_1475027.htm

President Prithvirajsing Roopun of Mauritius gives a speech at the welcome and farewell party on Jan 31, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Mauritius President Prithvirajsing Roopun attended a party to welcome the new director of the China Cultural Center in Mauritius on Jan 31.

“Thanks to support from the Chinese and Mauritius governments and China Embassy to Mauritius, mutual understanding between the two nations was deepened through a series of cultural exchange events, including Chinese Film Week, Happy Chinese New Year, Dragon Festival and Mid-Autumn Festival celebrations,?Roopun said.

He said many impressive cultural activities were held by the center over the past four years. Cultural exchange will be brought to a higher level with effort from the two governments, he added.

As Zhang Xinhong took office as the new director of the China Cultural Center in Mauritius, an event was held to welcome his arrival and bid farewell to his predecessor Song Yanqun. Chinese Ambassador to Mauritius Li Miaoguang and about 300 guests, students from the center and local representatives from the Mauritius Chinese Association attended the party.


Song Yanqun, left, former director of the China Cultural Center in Mauritius, and Mauritius president Prithvirajsing Roopun on Jan 31, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-06 14:14:54
<![CDATA[Dream collection on show]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/04/content_1475019.htm

A Qing Dynasty painting Grand View Garden is on show.[Photo provided to China Daily]

An exhibition examining the cultural legacy of Cao Xueqin's literary masterwork Dream of the Red Chamber is now available at the National Museum of China website, Lin Qi reports.

Adaptations of works of intellectual property, such as online literature, that have been made into movies and drama series, are sweeping Chinese mass media and proving lucrative.

Yet creating successful IP products is not the monopoly of modern artists. More than 250 years ago, in suburban Beijing, a man named Cao Xueqin made one such work which has endured for centuries-despite never having benefited from its success.

Cao, who was plagued by destitution and illness, authored a semi-autobiographical novel titled Dream of the Red Chamber. In the work he drew on the rise and fall of his own once well-connected family to describe the tragedy of an extended feudal family surnamed Jia.

He first circulated copies of the manuscript among his friends, who were touched not only by the downfall of the Jia clan, but also by the distressing love story between the two main characters, Jia Baoyu and Lin Daiyu. People were also caught up by the hypocrisy and cruelty of the upper classes, which exposed the worsening social crisis in 18th-century China.

Sadly, Cao died of grief in 1763 soon after his only son's death. He was unable to see his work make it to print. The first edition of which was published in 1791 earned him the respect of literary aficionados and casual readers, alike.

Today, Dream of the Red Chamber is acknowledged as one of the pinnacles of Chinese literature. It offers an encyclopedic understanding of Chinese art and culture, including poetry, music, operas, folk customs, handicrafts, architecture and gastronomy.

This work of fiction still enjoys a wide readership both at home and abroad, where it has been translated into more than 100 languages. It also prompted the development of a field of exclusive study known as Redology.


A painting on display.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Opened in December at the National Museum of China, an exhibition titled The Sole Pinnacle and an Immortal Masterpiece pays tribute to Cao and his only known literary work.

A selection of editions of Dream of the Red Chamber published during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) are on display at the show, alongside related artifacts that reflect the social context in which Cao lived and wrote.

Suspended on Jan 25 amid the growing coronavirus outbreak, the exhibition can still be visited online.

The exhibition also gathers together a range of adaptations and other works inspired by Dream of the Red Chamber, a time-honored work that remains more popular than any other piece of Chinese literature.

Bai Yuntao, deputy director of the National Museum of China and exhibition curator, says, "Dream of the Red Chamber is recognized as the epitome of Chinese culture and history, embodying aesthetic values in terms of poetry, music, architecture and other forms of art. It is also considered a literary peak difficult to be exceeded in terms of quality and influence.

"Ever since its birth, the novel has garnered a myriad of praise."

He says the exhibition's title is taken from a commentary by Liang Qichao, a noted historian, philosopher and politician who lived during the late 19th century and early 20th century.

Liang said, "When talking about Chinese novels, Dream of the Red Chamber is the sole pinnacle and an immortal masterpiece that makes other works not worth mentioning."

"Liang spoke highly of the work, although his opinions sound a little too assertive," Bai says.

Liang commented in another article that, "People who read Dream of the Red Chamber always feel a lingering attachment to it, or a sadness caused by it."

Bai says the selection of documents and artifacts related to Cao and Dream of the Red Chamber have been drawn from the collections of a dozen museums, libraries and other cultural institutions from around the country.


A Qing-era edition of Dream of the Red Chamber with illustrations on show.[Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

He Weiguo, executive secretary-general of the Society of Dream of the Red Chamber in Beijing, says the last, similarly grand celebration of this masterpiece was in 1963, when an exhibition was held at the Palace Museum to mark the 200th anniversary of Cao's death.

He says with its unprecedented solemnity and scale, the exhibition in 1963 introduced the historical context in which Dream of the Red Chamber was born, presented several editions of the work and charted the development of Redology and presented other relevant artifacts, as well as Cao's biography.

He says the 1963 show not only honored the memory of Cao, but also offered an insight into the cultural depths of the novel and its influence. He adds that the exhibition will only serve to further deepen study and interest in the novel, and as many members of his society were involved in organizing the exhibition, they plan to give talks about their latest academic findings.

The ongoing exhibition also includes new editions of the novel and related documents and objects of historic value which have emerged ever since the 1963 show.

For example, a refined and detailed album of 230 paintings, which narrates the story of Dream of the Red Chamber and took the 19th-century painter Sun Wen some 36 years to complete, is also on display at the show. It was rediscovered in the collection of Lyushun Museum in Dalian, Liaoning province, in 2004 and reintroduced to scholars of Redology.

As well as the new academic depths it achieves, the exhibition will also present a carnival for Dream of the Red Chamber aficionados where they will be amazed by all kinds of peripheral collectibles that have been produced to exemplify the novel's far-reaching influence.

The eye-catching objects on show include colorful yuefenpai calendar posters and commodity posters, popular during the first half of the 20th century, which depict scenarios of Dream of the Red Chamber and mostly feature leading figures of the time such as Jia Baoyu, Lin Daiyu and Xue Baochai.

One poster shows Baoyu and Daiyu visiting Miaoyu, another main character who was a Buddhist nun who also resides at Daguanyuan, or Grand View Garden, which provides the setting for much of the story.


A set of traditional pastries, inspired by a Qing painting titled Feast at Yihong Courtyard, is on offer to visitors.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Interestingly, instead of treating her guests with quality tea as it is described in the novel, Miaoyu presents a bottle of the cocoa that the poster advertised.

Dream of the Red Chamber has long been one of the most adapted pieces of Chinese literature. For example, Peking Opera arias based on the novel's plot and sung by the late master artist Mei Lanfang also became classics.

The exhibition displays two black-and-white photos, both from the collection of the Chinese National Academy of Arts, one showing Mei portraying Daiyu in an opera-film titled Daiyu Buries the Flowers from 1924, and another in which he played Qingwen in a play titled Qingwen Tears the Fan in 1916, both noted scenarios from the novel.

Several video screens are also installed at the exhibition where visitors can choose from some 36 films, dramas, operas and folk tunes inspired by the novel, ranging from a 1944 film in which Zhou Xuan, the iconic singer and actress, portrays Daiyu, to a performance of the work given by the San Francisco Opera in 2017.

Specially created for the exhibition, a set of traditional Chinese guozi pastries which contain eight types of filling will be offered at stands in the museum and in its cafe, when the show reopens to the public in the future. The National Museum of China will remain closed until further notice.

The cakes resemble eight flowers that appear in a 2.3 meter-long Qing-era painting in the National Museum's collection which is also on display at the current exhibition.

The painting, titled Feast at Yihong Courtyard, depicts a vivid scene from the novel in which a dozen of principal female characters gather at a night gala to celebrate Baoyu's birthday at his residence, Yihong Courtyard.

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2020-02-04 08:26:33
<![CDATA[Artwork by children offers inspiring message to fight virus]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/06/content_1474988.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, the 2020 spring semester for Chinese schools has been postponed. But students can still continue their studies in various ways while staying at home.

Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.

Fuelled by imagination and creativity, these artworks display warmth as well as strength. The messages delivered by the kids are multifaceted. We can feel their determination that the epidemic will be soon be defeated, we can also see their admiration and gratitude for all the medical workers, who play a vital role in this battle.


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-06 09:27:34
<![CDATA[Local art form aims to raise awareness]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/06/content_1474986.htm

A bird's-eye view of the cultural auditorium at Dong'ao village, Caocun township in Ruian, Zhejiang province.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Auditoriums for cultural activities are bringing people together, Xu Xiaodan, Ma Zhenhuan and Qin Jirong report from Wenzhou, Zhejiang province.

Many auditoriums in Zhejiang province, constructed in recent years to host cultural programs, have turned into places from where locals are helping the fight against the novel coronavirus.

In Wenzhou, a city in Zhejiang with more than 300 confirmed cases of infection as of Wednesday, the management team of the local cultural auditorium is coordinating efforts of officials, rural residents and volunteers in disease control and prevention.


The main hall and stage at the auditorium.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Dozens of teams were formed within few days to post notices on bulletin boards of auditoriums, tell villagers about the dos and don'ts during the period, register people from Hubei, distribute face masks and control the entry and exit of vehicles and individuals.

"I get more than 300 phone calls every day. We are trying our best to curb the spread of the virus on our island," says Huang Jianfeng, a volunteer from Ximen in Yueqing, a county-level city in Wenzhou, which reported 75 confirmed cases of infection as of Sunday.

Meanwhile, guci, a ballad, and slogans are being used to alert senior villagers to the epidemic. Chen Dehua, who is in charge of the cultural auditorium in Huling town of Ruian, another county-level city in Wenzhou, composed lyrics about preventive measures for a guci show on Jan 26 to increase awareness among the elderly. The ballad, titled Health is a Blessing, is now played by the broadcasting stations in Ruian.


A library inside the auditorium in Dong'ao village.[Photo provided to China Daily]

People in rural areas of China didn't have modern facilities to enjoy cultural activities and there were not many proper venues to mobilize people in public events such as healthcare campaigns in the past before the auditoriums were built.

Zhejiang, an economic powerhouse in East China, began to build cultural auditoriums in 2013, when the per capita net income of farmers in the province had secured the top place nationwide yet again. The provincial government began to pay attention to the cultural life of rural residents as daily public requirements became broader.

In the same year, the province launched a drive to build cultural auditoriums in Zhejiang's villages and included it in the "10 must-do things for the people". In 2019, the province had 3,282 new cultural auditoriums and by the end of last year, the number had crossed 14,300. Aimed at showcasing local culture, most such venues were constructed in accordance with local conditions. They are not just grand halls for performances or meetings but also bases for diverse activities.


Xihe Cultural Auditorium in Tangxia township, Ruian, Zhejiang province, organizes volunteers to participate in the fight against the epidemic caused by the novel coronavirus on Jan 30.

Yangzhai village in Wenzhou's Ouhai district is a cradle of guci. Since a cultural auditorium was built there in 2013, the art form has been regenerated through better inheritance and development. Every month, there are four guci performances staged in the auditorium, attracting hundreds from the village and its neighboring areas to gather at the 1,800-square-meter hall, Jiang Yuzhou, Party chief of Yangzhai, says.

"The older generations in Wenzhou have a deep affection for traditional folk art," he tells China Daily."We hope to provide entertainment for the elderly, and also promote guci culture among young generations via activities in the auditorium."

Many overseas Chinese have roots in Yangzhai and are fond of guci, which Jiang says will help in its inheritance and development.


A staff worker puts up notices about epidemic prevention on the bulletin board of a cultural auditorium in Ruian on Feb 1.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Zishang village in Wenzhou, just 4 kilometers away from Yangzhai, has more than 3,000 villagers working and living abroad nowadays. Some of them are overseas migrants, and some are working or living there temporarily. Foreign influence is seen in the village's auditorium that was constructed in 2017, such as a Western restaurant and an exhibition and sales room for imported goods. There were many vacant houses due to villagers moving out, Jin Yongyong, Party secretary of Zishang, says.

After the completion of the auditorium, he drew a blueprint of a modern complex for culture, tourism and entertainment with the auditorium at the center, and made a plan to attract business and investment. With the support of overseas Chinese, with origins in the village, tourism resources, including a flower field, a restaurant and a Westernstyle street began to spring up in Zishang, and the auditorium has been given a new role-the service center for tourists.

Jin says in future he plans to apply advanced technologies such as 5G and facial recognition in the village's management and operation in a bid to build Zishang into a "modern village with international hues".


A team of workers organized by local cultural auditorium in Yuecheng subdistrict in Yueqing, Zhejiang province, check epidemic prevention in a local household on Jan 26.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Seeing how cultural auditoriums are changing their daily life, people in Zhejiang have shown a growing zeal for public affairs and a stronger sense of belonging.

Hou Yuexiang is one of the volunteers in Qingnianfang community of Wenzhou. Besides offering care and love to neighbors through voluntary services, the 70-year-old and her 85 peers make up a team in charge of the daily management of the community's cultural auditorium.

"The auditorium, along with a library and a gym, were built for us and the activities enrich our cultural life," says Hou," which makes it necessary to ensure the orderly operation of these facilities by ourselves."

She adds: "As a volunteer, I am so glad to see that people from the community, young and old, appreciate and enjoy our services in the auditorium."

Chen Chaonan, a resident of Nan'ao village in Ruian, says she and her children are frequent visitors to the local cultural auditorium. "People of all ages are able to have fun there due to the multiple choices for entertainment, including chess games, toys, books and fitness equipment."

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2020-02-06 08:23:30
<![CDATA[Spanish vlogger speaks out for China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/06/content_1474984.htm

A Spanish vlogger refuted false views on the coronavirus outbreak, denouncing malicious actions taken by internet users abroad and those who are profiting from stirring unnecessary fear among the public.

In a video released by Noel Sirerol on Feb 1, who goes by the web username Noel.Sunuoyi on Chinese social media, Sirerol slashed ill-willed comments, adding they were misguided by false information.

Video by Noel.Sunuoyi. 

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2020-02-06 10:06:36
<![CDATA[Eradicate the prejudice - I am not a virus, I am a human]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/05/content_1474921.htm

A heartwarming scene was recently seen on the streets of Florence, Italy. A Chinese Italian who wore a face mask, with a placard reading "I am not a virus, I am a human" at his side, met with enthusiastic hugs of passers-by that showed no fear of the novel coronavirus which has been spreading in China.

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2020-02-05 11:57:47
<![CDATA['Festive China': 24 Solar Terms]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/04/content_1474844.htm

The traditional Chinese lunar calendar divides the year into 24 solar terms. More than 2,000 years ago, ancient Chinese people created this overall framework to mark the annual passage of time based on observations of the sun's motion. Nowadays, the 24 solar termsnot only apply to farming, but also guide Chinese people in everyday life.

In 2016, the 24 solar terms were included in UNESCO's Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Watch this episode of Festive China to find out more.

Festive China is a series of short clips that focus on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes, and how they are manifested in today's China.

Festive China: Spring Festival

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2020-02-04 09:58:49
<![CDATA['Susu' China! Stay strong Wuhan!]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-02/04/content_1474849.htm                                

The 2020 Happy Chinese New Year program in Thailand generates positive energy, and the people of the world send blessings to China. On Feb 2, at the 2020 Happy Chinese New Year celebration at Nai Lert Park in Bangkok, where people were experiencing Chinese culture, individuals from all over the world rooted for those in China fighting against the epidemic.

In every corner of Nai Lert Park in Bangkok, where the Chinese cultural atmosphere prevailed, people could always hear the Thai expression susu, which means jiayou, or stay strong!

The 2020 Happy Chinese New Year at Nai Lert Park in Bangkok is the first time that Thailand's well-known Nai Lert Flower and Garden Art Fair has worked with the Happy Chinese New Year program. Under the support and guidance of the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism, the Chinese Embassy in Thailand and the Shanghai Municipal Administration of Culture and Tourism, the event was carried out by Shanghai Oriental Pearl International Communication Co Ltd. The activities included a traditional Chinese lantern show, cultural exhibition and workshops such as painting Peking Opera masks and making Spring Festival lanterns.

In light of the current situation, the work plan of the event was adjusted in time. The Chinese and Thai sides worked together to ensure that the event was successfully held from Jan 30 to Feb 2.

Launched in 1986, covering an area of 3.2 hectares, the Nai Lert Flower and Garden Art Fair exhibited the largest flower carpet in Southeast Asia with Chinese cultural elements this year.

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2020-02-04 11:27:28
<![CDATA[Visits from China to UK hit new record in 2019]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474740.htm

The University of Cambridge has become a popular tourism destination for Chinese people. [Photo by Tan Xi/For China Daily]

 

A record number of visits from China to Britain were recorded in the nine months to September 2019, according to new official figures from the British tourist authority.

VisitBritain said there were 321,000 visits from China during the nine-month period, up 8 percent on the same period in 2018. Visitors from China spent 553 million pounds (722.9 million U.S. dollars) during this period, up 11 percent compared with 2018.

New figures released by the Office for National Statistics show it was a record October for inbound tourism spending in Britain. Visitors spent 2.3 billion pounds (3 billion dollars) in Britain in October 2019, the highest ever for the month of October.

The statistics also show that it was a record-breaking August-to-October period in 2019 for both overseas visits to Britain and for visitor spending. August 2019 was the highest month ever for both inbound visits and spending and only the third time ever to break the four million mark for inbound visits to Britain in a single month.

According to VisitBritain, tourism is worth 127 billion pounds (166 billion dollars) to the British economy and the number of overseas visits to Britain is forecast to rise in 2020 to 39.7 million, the highest ever.

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2020-01-31 15:17:52
<![CDATA[Museum preserves old sounds of Beijing]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474739.htm

Shijia Hutong Museum is a popular attraction for visitors from home and abroad. [Photo provided to China Daily]

 

Street hawkers and vendors calling out their wares, chirping cicadas and pigeon whistles... the lost sounds of traditional Beijing life can still be found in a museum.

By touching a screen in a small room in the Shijia Hutong Museum, visitors can hear more than 300 sounds of old Beijing, which are gradually falling silent due to the rapid development of the modern city.

"Sharpen scissors and knives!" "Deliver goods to your doorstep! Blush, fragrant powder and embroidery needles!" Most of the sounds in the museum are hawkers' cries.

"Families living in hutongs used to buy most of their life necessities from peddlers traveling through streets and lanes," said Colin Siyuan Chinnery, the initiator of the sound project.

Before the advent of supermarkets and convenience stores, merchants roamed the hutongs, the city's labyrinth of traditional alleys, delivering goods and services to people's doorsteps. Each of them had a unique noisemaker or hawker's cry to announce their arrival.

"The peddling is loud but has a nice rhythm to it. I can feel people's humor, optimism and energy," said Li Ruting, a 28-year-old female traveler to Beijing from the southern Chinese city of Nanning.

Old Beijing was a city of distinctive sounds. For visitors like Li, the museum recreates the city's past life.

Wang Lin, 26, came from the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou. He was shocked when he learned that camels used to be the main vehicles carrying coal, silk, rice and other life necessities in Beijing 70 years ago.

"I didn't believe it until I heard the camel bells in the museum," Wang said. "It must have been fascinating for people to see camels in their daily life."

"Most sounds of old Beijing are gone. That's why I want to record it. Old sound can still evoke people's memories," Chinnery said.

As an artist living in China, 48-year-old Chinnery started the sound project in 2013 when the government of Dongcheng District sought his opinion to turn the old house of his grandmother into a museum.

Majoring in Chinese culture at the University of London, Chinnery has spent many years working in the British Library on a project of Dunhuang, an important component of the Silk Road culture.

As a child, Chinnery used to live in Beijing and learned kungfu. In 2002, Chinnery decided to go back to Beijing.

When he lived in Beijing as a child, the sound of pigeon whistles made a deep impression on him.

"Beijingers attach a whistle to their pigeons. When the pigeons fly, the sound of the whistle rings. I've never seen that in other countries," he said.

However, fewer and fewer pigeons with whistles can be found nowadays. Chinnery is developing a database of different sounds that were once heard in the old alleyways.

It took him a long time to find a 94-year-old former street hawker and record his shouts to advertise his goods and services. To recreate the original sound of camel bells, Chinnery went all the way to the desert and recorded the sound of camels there.

"Sounds can deliver messages about culture, history and personal feelings. I hope more people can join me to preserve the vanishing sounds of Beijing and share their memories of sounds," Chinnery said.

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2020-01-31 14:54:38
<![CDATA[New York Philharmonic celebrates Year of the Rat with annual concert]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474738.htm

Musicians perform Gift during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat.

Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen.

The event also marked Zhang's Philharmonic debut. As the Gold Medalist of the 2009 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Zhang studied under American classical pianist Gary Graffman, who was the soloist for the New York Philharmonic's performance of Rhapsody in Blue on the soundtrack of Woody Allen's 1979 film Manhattan.

The virtuoso performance given by the young pianist won a standing ovation from over 2,700 people at the David Geffen Hall. Many of them were New Yorkers who grew up listening to the piece, which as a composition for solo piano and jazz band premiered in New York in 1924.

During a meeting with local press on Monday, the Shanghai-born pianist described the concert's program as a beautiful musical exchange between China and the United States.

"I think the Chinese traditional music and the American jazz are as remote as you could get in terms of artistic aesthetics," said Zhang.

With a program in which a Chinese pianist gets to play The Rhapsody in Blue and an American violinist plays The Butterfly Lovers, "it really made a statement of what musicians are trying to do with music in cultural exchange," he added.

Shaham, one of the most acclaimed violinists in the world, recorded The Butterfly Lovers with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra in 2007.

His performance on Friday night demonstrated his special connection with the classic piece, with an interpretation that blended both Chinese and Western music styles.

The concert also marked the U.S. premiere of China-born composer Zhou Tian's Gift, and the New York premiere of Korean composer Texu Kim's Spin-Flip.

The Philharmonic was under the baton of world-renowned Chinese conductor Yu Long, who has conducted a highly acclaimed list of orchestras throughout the world, including New York, Los Angeles, Munich, and Tokyo philharmonic orchestras.

Currently vice president of the Chinese Musicians Association and artistic director and chief conductor of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, Yu collaborates frequently with many of the world's most celebrated soloists, such as Lang Lang, Yo-Yo Ma, and Wang Yujia.

The New York Philharmonic has welcomed the Lunar New Year with an annual celebration since 2012. This year's Lunar New Year fell on Jan. 25.


Chinese conductor Yu Long conducts The Butterfly Lovers with the orchestra during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians perform Spin-Flip during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]


American violinist Gil Shaham (C) performs The Butterfly Lovers with the orchestra during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]


Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen (Front) performs Rhapsody in Blue with the orchestra during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 14:42:18
<![CDATA[Exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" held in Lisbon, Portugal]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474737.htm

People visit the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]


A visitor views artworks at the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]


People view a painting at the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 14:26:08
<![CDATA[Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474736.htm

A female artist of Shanghai Chinese Orchestra performs "Landscape around the Lake" via Chinese flute during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]


Dragon dancers of Zhejiang Shaoju Opera Theatre perform "Grand Bustling Chinese New Year" during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]


An actress of Zhejiang Shaoju Opera Theatre performs during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actors of of Shanghai Chinese Orchestra wave to audience after performances during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 12:41:12
<![CDATA[Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations held in Los Angeles]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474735.htm

Lion dancers perform during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles, the United States, Jan. 26, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A performer interacts with a girl during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles, the United States, Jan. 26, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Spectators watch traditional Chinese martial arts during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles, the United States, Jan. 26, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 12:19:20
<![CDATA[Brooklyn Nets hosts Chinese culture night in New York]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474734.htm

Traditional Chinese lion dancing is performed during the Chinese culture night hosted by Brooklyn Nets at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City, the United States, Jan. 29, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

The Brooklyn Nets hosted Chinese culture night on Jan 29 at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City.

To celebrate the Year of the Mouse, the team wore Lunar New Year pregame shooting shirts and its starting lineups were announced in Chinese. Videos of players saying internet buzzwords in Chinese won rounds of applause from the audience.

Traditional Chinese lion dancing and fan dancing were performed at breaks during the game between the Brooklyn Nets and the Detroit Pistons.

Fans could also have their names written in custom Chinese calligraphy and receive a sampling of rice cake desserts.

In addition to the traditional Chinese cultural performances, the evening's celebration also included more modern elements to meet the taste of the young people, said Joe Tsai, owner of the Brooklyn Nets.

Well-known Asian American rapper MC Jin performed at halftime and wished everyone happy Chinese New Year in both Cantonese and English. The evening also featured unique dance routines from the Brooklynettes and TAKALA LAND, a Chinese kids hip-hop dance team.


Dancers perform during the Chinese culture night hosted by Brooklyn Nets at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City, the United States, Jan. 29, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Dancers perform during the Chinese culture night hosted by Brooklyn Nets at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City, the United States, Jan. 29, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 12:07:49
<![CDATA[Chinese New Year Concert held in Lithuanian capital]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474733.htm

People watch a Chinese New Year concert performed by China's Heilongjiang Art Troupe at Vilnius Town Hall in the Old Town of Vilnius, Lithuania, Jan. 28, 2020. Folk musicians of Heilongjiang Art Troupe from China staged a concert in Lithuanian capital Tuesday night to celebrate Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

Folk musicians of Heilongjiang Art Troupe from China staged a concert in Lithuanian capital Tuesday night to celebrate Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival.

Held at Vilnius Town Hall in the Old Town, the concert attracted an audience of more than 300, including First Deputy Chancellor Deividas Matulionis and head of the Group for Inter-Parliamentary Relations with China Kestutis Glaveckas.

In his opening speech, Chinese Ambassador to Lithuania Shen Zhifei talked about China's current fight against the outbreak of pneumonia caused by the novel coronavirus, saying "We hope that the international community has full confidence in the firm determination and competent ability of the Chinese government and people in dealing with the epidemic."

He also expressed his heartfelt gratitude to the Lithuanian government and people as well as the international community for their sympathy, understanding and support towards the Chinese people.

With the show in Vilnius as the last stop, the troupe kicked off its tour on Jan. 24 with six performances in Latvia and one in Lithuania.


People watch a Chinese New Year concert performed by China's Heilongjiang Art Troupe at Vilnius Town Hall in the Old Town of Vilnius, Lithuania, Jan. 28, 2020. Folk musicians of Heilongjiang Art Troupe from China staged a concert in Lithuanian capital Tuesday night to celebrate Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 11:42:07
<![CDATA[Flagship designs land ashore]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474732.htm

A building block model of the Shandong is unveiled on Jan 7 in Beijing. [Photo/China Daily]

 

The creative team that contributed to the logo and emblem of China's first home-built aircraft carrier has launched a range of products aimed at young consumers, Li Yingxue reports.

China's first fully homegrown aircraft carrier, the CNS Shandong, was delivered to the People's Liberation Army Navy at a port in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 17.

Two weeks later in Beijing, a series of cultural and creative souvenirs and products related to the launch of the warship were unveiled, from emblemed badges and baseball caps to detailed models of the Shandong.

Xie Dahuan, chief designer of China Shipbuilding Culture and Technology Co, was tasked with heading a team to create the new emblem and logo for the ship back in 2017, and to develop a range of ancillary products that would appeal to younger Chinese consumers.

The 12 designers who joined Xie's team were all born in the 1980s and '90s.

Xie spent many sleepless nights in the run-up to creating the first draft of designs, and over the past two and a half years, Xie's team submitted a total of 28 designs for the ship's emblem and logo.

"Even though the 28 versions seemed to change a lot, we were glad that the overall design direction didn't really alter much from our first draft," Xie says.

"Some of our designers have grown from knowing nothing about the military to being able to tell the difference between every fighter plane and aircraft carrier,"Xie says."We were all very touched the day the Shandong was delivered to the navy."

According to Xie, the composition of the emblem shows planes taking off from the aircraft carrier out at sea, and the emblem has been designed in such a way that it can be seen on three levels from different distances.

"If you see emblem from 5 meters away, it conveys the momentum of the navy. If you are looking at it from just one meter away, you can tell it's the Shandong. But if you study the emblem even more closely, you pick out all the details in the design," Xie explains.


Some block figures representing different roles on the aircraft carrier. [Photo/China Daily]

 

The water motif below the Chinese characters "PLA Navy Shandong" originates from a pattern used in porcelain found in Shandong province that dates back to ancient times.

"The reason we put the water pattern on a ribbon is that we want to show that, even though the PLA Navy has a short history of 70 years, it's still part of China's 5,000-year-old culture," Xie explains.

To make sure each line of the drawing of the aircraft carrier on the emblem is exactly the same as the Shandong, Xie's team visited the vessel around a dozen times.

Compared to the emblem, which is bold and steadfast, the logo looks younger, more modern and dynamic-the wings of the eagle hold up the deck of the aircraft carrier.

Born and raised in Neijiang, Sichuan province, Xie has been a military buff since childhood.

He still remembers the day he stepped onto the Shandong for the first time. "My mind went blank for the first 10 minutes, and in my trance, I seemed to meet my 10-year-old self who told me that my dream of working with the army had finally come true by designing the emblem for the Shandong.

"Over the past two years, I've witnessed the Shandong moving closer to perfection. It's such a large ship that you could easily get lost on it."

There was one time when Xie visited the Shandong, when it was moored alongside the CNS Liaoning, China's first aircraft carrier."They looked so fantastic together, and they made me feel really small," he recalls.

Having graduated from Beihang University with a major in industrial design, Xie designed the trophy for the Red Star Design Award.

As a designer, he keeps to the rule that each piece of work he designs should be a masterpiece."The designer should always create work that comes from the soul. Without soul, your work will become an orphan, but if you do it properly, it will always stay attached to you."


A poster that celebrates the Shandong's commissioning ceremony on Dec 17. [Photo/China Daily]

 

The Chinese blockbuster Operation Red Sea, which was released in February 2018, taking in 3.65 billion yuan ($530 million) at the box office, inspired Xie's team to project the image of the PLA Navy in a more cinematic way. "We thought to ourselves, 'why don't we design a range of cultural and creative products of the Shandong for the younger people?" Xie says.

Xie saw how good the navy soldiers on the Shandong looked in their uniform, so he wanted them to also look stylish off duty, and designed a baseball cap for them and fans of the Shandong to wear.

The baseball caps were developed by Capglobal, a company from Nantong, Jiangsu province, which is also one of the largest headwear manufacturers in the world.

The designers at Capglobal identified the characteristic Asian head shape and designed a special type of cap to fit Chinese people, a first for the company.

According to Xie, the cap is deeper than other models designed for the North American or European markets.

"The blue color of the cap is dyed twice so that it won't fade and will withstand temperatures that the soldiers onboard the Shandong will have to work in, which can be as low as-20 C or as high as 55 C," Xie says.

From caps to building blocks, Xie's team has designed a range of products related to the carrier, which are on sale at the Shandong Carrier Cultural and Creative online store on JD.


The emblem and logo of the Shandong. [Photo/China Daily]

 

"From the choice of fabrics for the caps to the detailing on the building blocks, each decision was made to present the quality of the 'made in China' brand," Xie says.

"In the future, we want to design new cultural and creative products about the Shandong so that people from different ages with different hobbies can get a feel for military culture."

Wang Yan, head of the China Institute of Marine Technology and Economy, says the design and release of the cultural and creative products of the Shandong will help to promote nautical and aeronautic culture in China.

The China State Shipbuilding Corp donated a selection of their products related to the Shandong to the Military Museum of the Chinese People's Revolution in Beijing on Jan 7.

He Qinglin, deputy chief designer of the Shandong, says that while his designs revolved more around engineering, Xie's designs were focused on art. He says the design of the Shandong's emblem and logo, and its cultural and creative products embrace the vitality of the ship.

"These cultural designs and products will help ordinary people to learn about China's first homegrown aircraft carrier," He says.


Xie Dahuan, chief designer of China Shipbuilding Culture and Technology Co, leads a team that helped to create the new emblem and logo for China's first fully homegrown aircraft carrier, the CNS Shandong. [Photo/China Daily]

 

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2020-01-31 11:21:20
<![CDATA[International students get in on festival fun]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474730.htm

Foreigners learn to make jiaozi dumplings, an essential part of a typical Chinese New Year feast, in Shanxi province. [Photo by Liang Shengren/For China Daily]

 

Activities organized to spread joy, enlightenment of China's biggest annual celebration, Yin Ruowei reports.

International students studying in North China's Shanxi province are being given a taste of the Spring Festival atmosphere this year, taking part in activities specially aimed at involving them in what the celebration is all about.

In the Shanxi city of Datong, a cultural activity inviting international students to get into the holiday spirit was held recently, attracting some 200 students from more than 50 countries to take part.

"This year is the third time we've held the event. We hope that students from overseas can be a part of the festive atmosphere in Shanxi, a province that is undergoing transformation and development," said Li Wenbin, a teacher with the school of international education and exchange at Taiyuan University of Technology.

On Lunar New Year's Eve, which fell on Jan 24, a group of international students went to Yangjiayao village in the southern suburbs of Datong to take part in a variety of festivities including a typical reunion dinner, a live gala, writing couplets and paper-cutting.

Student Devin Grace O'Sullivan from the United States thoroughly enjoyed the new experiences.

"It was a very interesting experience for me to celebrate Lunar New Year's Eve with local families. It's the most important day for family reunion in China," she said.


Shanxi's paper-cutting is among the world's intangible cultural heritage. [Photo by Ma Liming/For China Daily]

 

O'Sullivan visited families in the village, ate dumplings and gave out lucky red envelopes. She also learned some essential Spring Festival customs.

"I learned that getting a haircut would be considered as unlucky during the first month of Lunar New Year," she said.

Libyan Waled Yahya Mussa, who has studied in China for three years and is now a PhD student in mechanical engineering at TYUT, said the activity helped him connect more with Shanxi and China.

"I learned to make dumplings and cook them myself. During my stay here, I can eat fast with chopsticks and use vinegar with every meal," he said."The elderly are respected here. Shanxi people are very friendly and have helped me a lot."

Another city in the province, Pingyao, is encouraging tourists from home and abroad to take part in its Spring Festival celebrations.

David, a student originally from the US, said that Spring Festival decorations are rarely found in big cities, but in Pingyao cultural elements of the festival are everywhere.

"I used to celebrate Spring Festival in other parts of China and I found people use the holiday to spend time with relatives and friends, or to travel. But in Pingyao, there are many vibrant activities to choose from, including lion dancing, yangko dancing and guessing riddles."

Taylor, who has traveled with David around Shanxi, said: "Almost all places in Shanxi accept mobile payment services. And Shanxi has protected the environment well by controlling pollution over the years."

Li Yali and Wang Chaojun contributed to this story.


Foreign tourists take a photo in front of ancient walls in Pingyao, Shanxi province. [Photo by Sun Ruisheng/China Daily]

 

Overseas students studying at Taiyuan University of Technology spend their Spring Festival holiday in Pingyao. [Photo by Dou Huanqin/For China Daily]

 

Tourists from around the world join local residents to celebrate Chinese New Year in Pingyao, Shanxi province. [Photo by Sun Ruisheng/China Daily]


Residents perform a yangko dance in Lyuliang, Shanxi province. [Photo by Liu Liangliang/For China Daily]

 

Young performers join a festival parade in Lingshi county, Shanxi province. [Photo by Zhang Yijing and Duan Shoubao/For China Daily]

 

Villagers read chunlian, or spring couplets, in Shanxi. [Photo by Liu Liangliang/For China Daily]

 

An international light show is held in Datong, Shanxi province. [Photo/China Daily]

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2020-01-31 11:04:14
<![CDATA[Europe awash in red for Lunar New Year festivities]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/31/content_1474731.htm

Teenagers learn Chinese painting at a celebration of Chinese New Year in Riga, Latvia, on Saturday. [Photo/Xinhua]

The spacious lobby of Rosengarten, a conference center in downtown Mannheim, Germany, was decked out in Chinese red.

Crowds gathered in front of exhibit booths where folk artists from China's northwestern Shaanxi province showcased their skills of paper-cutting, woodblock printing and calligraphy.

Nine-year-old Anja was holding her calligraphy work that reads "Shu Nian Da Ji" ("Happy Year of the Rat").

"I've tried the tea ceremony, Go, and calligraphy. I will show this piece to my classmates and teachers at school," she said.

At a gala later that evening, Shaanxi artists entertained a local audience. It is a part of the Happy Chinese New Year cultural events taking place across the world but it was the first time the event was held in Germany's Frankfurt consular district.

This year's Spring Festival, or Chinese Lunar New Year, began on Jan 25. While residents from and around Mannheim had the chance to enjoy the culture and history of Shaanxi, people in Berlin welcomed an art troupe from Southwest China's Guizhou province. A gala featuring singing, dancing, and music offered the Berliners a glimpse of the musical traditions of ethnic minority groups living in Guizhou.

On Jan 15, for the ninth consecutive year, Berlin's historic Red Town Hall rolled out the red carpet and lit Chinese red lanterns for its Happy Chinese New Year gala.

Sawsan Chebli, state secretary for the Berlin city government, said that hosting Chinese New Year celebrations has become an important cultural tradition in Berlin. It also signifies the all-around cooperation between Berlin and China, and particularly between Berlin and its sister city, Beijing.

Addressing the opening ceremony of this year's gala in Berlin, Chinese Ambassador to Germany Wu Ken also stressed that cultural and tourism exchanges between the two countries play an increasingly crucial role in bringing people from two sides closer, and sound people-to-people ties lay the very foundation for bilateral relations.

In the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, officials have made it a custom to record video messages addressed to the Chinese people living in the region ahead of the Spring Festival.

Andreas Pinkwart, the state's economic minister, said in this year's video that the Year of the Rat represents qualities of reliability and persistence, and the ability to turn the unfavorable situation into a favorable one.

"These are characteristics that we particularly need in today's times when the world trade system is facing growing challenges," he said.

Belgrade fairytale

Meanwhile, for people in Belgrade, Serbia, celebrating Chinese New Year with lights and fireworks in the city center is popular as well. On Jan 24, the countdown to Chinese New Year was staged at the Kalemegdan Park and Belgrade Fortress, where citizens gathered to enjoy the second Chinese Festival of Lights.

A fairytale world of colorful flowers, flamingos, chariot horsemen, Chinese dragons, lanterns and other light sculptures has been built in Belgrade and the city of Novi Sad. The event will last until mid-February.

Tasovac, a Belgrade resident, said he learned about the light exhibition from local media and enjoyed it very much.

"It was eye-opening," he said, "It was a great opportunity to allow us to feel the festivity of the Spring Festival here in Belgrade. I've always had an interest in Chinese culture."

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2020-01-31 08:53:29
<![CDATA[Boundless devotion to mural cause]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/29/content_1474701.htm

Lou Jiaben works on the mural "Boundless River Flowing to the Sky's End" to restore the masterpiece's rich colors.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]

Last year, famous mural master Lou Jiaben was entrusted to restore the murals of the Yellow Crane Tower in Hubei province's Wuhan city and also work on new murals to replace those that have become weather-beaten. Lou, who is almost 80 years old, has devoted his career to murals, especially those of the Yellow Crane Tower since the 1980s.

In 1983, Lou undertook the mission to create grand murals on the fifth floor of the Yellow Crane Tower. During the period from 1984 to 1987, he dedicated himself to make the paintings vivid and magnificent. The paintings mainly demonstrate the culture and history of the Yellow Crane Tower, and also depict illustrations of the legend and poems about the tower. This time, through his persistence and hard work, the mural named "Boundless River Flowing to the Sky's End" on the fifth floor of the tower has been brought back to its former glory.


Lou delicately applies red paint to the lips of a court lady playing a pipa, a four-stringed musical instrument.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou and his wife pose for a photo in front of the Yellow Crane Tower.[Photo by Li Hui/For China Daily]


Reference samples for the murals are strewn across a work table, along with other art equipment.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


People attend the opening ceremony of the "Boundless River Flowing to the Sky's End" mural exhibit held on the fifth floor of the Yellow Crane Tower.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou takes a look at mural repairs during the ongoing renovation work.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou and his assistant have takeout for lunch.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou speaks to guests at a work table crowded with an assortment of containers filled with colored pigments.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou looks at the mural while his two assistants rest behind him on scaffolding in the Yellow Crane Tower.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]

 

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2020-01-29 10:28:47
<![CDATA[Chinese New Year celebrated across world]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/26/content_1474671.htm

People perform as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People perform a dragon dance as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A man performs traditional Chinese martial arts as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People dance as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Tokyo Skytree tower is lit in red for the Chinese New Year in Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. Tokyo Skytree tower is lit in red from Saturday to Monday celebrating the Chinese New Year which starts on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the market on the eve of the Chinese New Year in Singapore's Chinatown on Jan 24, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China pose for photos with guests after a performance held to mark the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the diplomatic relations between China and Colombia and to greet the Chinese New Year in Bogota, Colombia, Jan 24, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People watch fireworks during an activity greeting the Chinese New Year in Medan, Indonesia, Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Young people wearing Chinese traditional clothes participate in a fashion show during the Chinese New Year celebration in Malang, Indonesia. Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Children decorate a giant panda statue in Lviv, Ukraine, Jan 23, 2020. A three-day celebration of the Chinese New Year kicked off in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv on Friday. A fair with traditional Chinese cuisine and souvenirs in the heart of the city, alongside panda statues which are to be decorated by local artists, are among this year's major attractions. [Photo/Xinhua]


A German girl dressed in traditional Han-style costumes attends a celebration event to greet the Chinese New Year in Mannheim, Germany, Jan 23, 2020. Under the title "The Shine of Shaanxi", a week-long event series brought by artists from Northwest China's Shaanxi province is part of the "Happy Chinese New Year" cultural event taking place across the world. [Photo/Xinhua]


People attend a celebration event to greet the Chinese New Year at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa, California, the US, Jan 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-26 16:47:02
<![CDATA[Spring festival celebrated in Maritime Museum in London]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/26/content_1474657.htm

Jan 25, National Maritime Museum hosted a series of Chinese Spring Festival activities with songs and dances brought by local Chinese community and the Guizhou Song and Dance Ensemble. Check out the celebration ?there is more than just lion dances.

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2020-01-26 03:24:56
<![CDATA[Concert hall celebrates New Year with a variety of shows]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474560.htm

A Chinese percussion concert will be staged on Feb 2 at the Forbidden City Concert Hall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The Forbidden City Concert Hall will hold a series of shows to celebrate the upcoming Spring Festival, or Chinese lunar New Year.

Highlights will include a performance by Peking Opera artists from the Jingju Theater Company of Beijing, including Chi Xiaoqiu, Hu Wenge and Li Hongtu. They will sing classic Peking Opera pieces on Jan 25.

Pipa player Wu Yuxia will team up with erhu player Song Fei to give a show of traditional Chinese folk songs on Jan 28.

Xiangsheng, or cross-talk, is a main attraction for audiences during the traditional Chinese festival. Veteran and new xiangsheng performers will join together to present a show on Jan 29 and 30.


Peking Opera singer Chi Xiaoqiu from Jingju Theater Company of Beijing will perform at the Forbidden City Concert Hall during the Chinese New Year holiday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Peking Opera singer Li Hongtu from Jingju Theater Company of Beijing will perform at the Forbidden City Concert Hall during the Chinese New Year holiday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A Peking Opera interpretation of episodes from modern Chinese drama Sishi Tongtang, or Four Generations under One Roof, will be staged on Jan 25 at the Forbidden City Concert Hall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-22 17:58:32
<![CDATA[Spring Festival reception held in Tel Aviv]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474544.htm

Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]

The Chinese Embassy in Israel recently hosted a 2020 Spring Festival reception in Tel Aviv. Dai Yuming, Charge d'Affaires of the Chinese Embassy, gave a speech, as did representatives from Chinese-funded enterprises and Chinese students. Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe put on a performance for the audience afterward.

Dai briefly reviewed China's past development and the progress of China-Israel relations in 2019, including political mutual trust, bilateral trade, people-to-people exchanges and cultural communication. He looked forward to witnessing more impressive progress in 2020.


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]

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2020-01-22 16:07:01
<![CDATA[China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism opens in Rome]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474541.htm

Luo Shugang, Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism, speaks at the opening ceremony of the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism held in Rome on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

As part of the major events celebrating the 50th anniversary of the establishment of China-Italy diplomatic ties, China and Italy will join hands to launch more than 100 programs during their bilateral culture and tourism year of 2020.

Opened in Rome this Tuesday, the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism received congratulatory letters from both Chinese President Xi Jinping and Italian President Sergio Mattarella. Luo Shugang, Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism, attended the opening events along with Chinese delegation.

Attending the opening concert at the Auditorium Parco della Musica were a total of 2,500 guests, including President of the Italian Senate Maria Elisabetta Alberti Casellati, Italian Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini, Chinese ambassador to Italy Li Junhua, and Italian ambassador to China Luca Ferrari.

Luo Shugang (second left), Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism; Dario Franceschini (third left), Italian culture minister; and Li Junhua (first left), Chinese ambassador to Italy, all attend the China-Italy Tourism Forum in Rome, on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An important part of the yearlong program, the China-Italy tourism forum, was held on Tuesday afternoon. More than 400 high-level government officials, international tourism organizations, educational institutions and think tanks discussed tourism cooperation and management.

Michele dall 'Ongaro, dean of Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Italy, reviewed the college's many examples of cooperation with China and looked forward to the 2020 Sino-Italian Culture and Tourism Year.

Francesco Rutelli, the Italian coordinator of the Sino-Italian cultural cooperation, said that Italy and China have cooperation in many cultural fields, including film, audio and video, modern art and design, food, fashion and other creative industries. Rutelli believes the forum exemplifies that Italy attaches great importance to the development of culture and tourism.


The China-Italy Tourism Forum takes place in Rome, on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Luo Shugang, Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism, said in a speech that holding the China-Italy Culture and Tourism Year was an important decision made by the leaders of the two countries with a view to the overall situation and long-term development of China-Italy relations.

He believed that China and Italy, as the representative ancient civilizations of the East and the West, have a long history of cultural exchanges. More than 2,000 years ago, ancient Rome was in the heyday of civilization, and the Chinese civilization also ushered in a glorious era. The ancient Silk Road connects Chinese culture, Indian culture, Persian culture, Arab culture, and ancient Greek and Roman culture.

Luo pointed out that since China and Italy established diplomatic relations 50 years ago and a comprehensive strategic partnership 16 years ago, the relationship between the two countries has maintained a good development trend. Especially in the 21st century, the two countries' cultural tourism cooperation has entered a fast track. Tourism is the best way to enhance the closeness of Chinese and Italian people. Holding the China-Italy Culture and Tourism Year is a bridge to spread civilization, exchange cultures and promote friendship.


The China-Italy Tourism Forum takes place in Rome, on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Italian Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini said that Italy and China have many similarities. The Belt and Road Initiative brings the civilizations of many countries together with a lot of opportunities, and it will develop in a better direction in the future. Cooperation in the fields of film, music and museums will continue. 2020 will be a very important and busy year, and there will be more cooperation between the two governments, and this momentum will continue.

Chinese and Italian cultural and tourism professionals also held discussions and exchanges on the topics of "dialogue between civilization and tourism exchanges", "intelligent tourism in an innovative era" and "social background and sustainable development of tourism".

The China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism will feature nearly 100 cultural and tourism activities in both countries, ranging from performing arts and visual arts to cultural heritage, tourism and creative design.

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2020-01-22 16:05:48
<![CDATA[Beijing's Haidian district celebrates festival with cultural activities]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474542.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

To welcome the upcoming Spring Festival, a cultural event showcasing local intangible cultural heritage and Chinese folk customs was held at the Daoxiang Lake tourism resort in Beijing's Haidian district on Jan 17.

Performances featuring bamboo-made horses, lion dance, yangko dance and other cultural activities drew over 500 visitors. New Year couplets and authentic snacks such as bingtanghulu (sugar-coated hawthorns), lyudagunr (glutinous rice rolls with sweet bean flour) and sugar painting were also on hand.

Representatives from several primary schools and middle schools in the district also came to display their handicrafts, including stone painting works and miniature monkeys made of dried cicadas and magnolia bulbs.

The district's culture and tourism bureau will hold more than 250 such cultural events in the next two months, which are estimated to attract 1.5 million participants.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

 

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2020-01-22 16:02:40
<![CDATA[Pop stars to be cultural guides in new reality show]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474534.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

An online reality show that brings the audience closer to the charm of intangible cultural heritage and achievements of the country’s poverty-alleviation efforts in important revolutionary areas will be aired this year.

Supported by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of China, the show, titled Original Aspiration on the Road, has invited young celebrities including Chinese pop star Zhu Zhengting, musical performer Zheng Yunlong and actor Li Mingde to be the travel guides.

Zhu, born in Anhui province, will take the audience to enjoy an in-depth tour in his hometown. He says he would like to go back to the places where he spent a carefree childhood and introduce the cultural treasures and local authentic snacks there.

Liu Qiang, Party secretary of the China Cultural Media Group, which is one of the show’s producers, says he hopes the show would promote the integrated development of culture and tourism as well as spread patriotism and community spirit among younger generations.

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2020-01-22 15:45:37
<![CDATA[Australian, Chinese youth celebrate Lunar New Year in Sydney with inspiring performances]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474528.htm

[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]

Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.

At the Sydney Chinese Cultural Center, around 130 young people were involved in the colorful extravaganza that saw visiting students from China's Jiangsu province perform Huangmei Opera in full costume for the local crowd.

In return, Australian students performed glamorous contemporary jazz routines. "We are extremely lucky to be connected with these performances, and the artistic side of the Chinese community," Australian dance teacher from Select Dance Co Jocelyn Ide said during her address.

"It's always of a high standard and it's so exciting and unusual for us to watch." "Of course, dance is a universal language which is spoken by all. So to be given the opportunity to experience the joining of our two cultures is invaluable, especially for our younger generations."


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]

As part of a series of the "Happy Chinese New Year" events to be held over the Spring Festival period, the China-Australia Youth Culture and Technology Festival also showcased over 30 paintings and calligraphy creations with the theme of "Beautiful China" and "Australia in My Eyes." In order to highlight technology exchanges between the two nations, students also gave impressive demonstrations of aerial drones and small robotic vehicles.

"The event provides a good opportunity for young people of both countries to experience the charm of Chinese and Australian multiculturalism, enhance friendship and broaden their horizons," Director of the Sydney Chinese Cultural Center Xiao Xiayong said.

"We hope that Chinese and Australian youths will conduct more cultural and scientific exchange activities in the future, to get a better understanding of different civilizations around the world and to view them with an open and inclusive mind." 


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-01-22 15:24:23
<![CDATA[Decorations marking Chinese Lunar New Year seen worldwide]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474521.htm

People shop at the Eaton Centre with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at a Chinese supermarket with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at the Eaton Centre with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at a Chinese supermarket with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A girl poses for photos with rat toys at a Chinese supermarket in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at a Chinese supermarket with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People walk past a giant commercial screen as it displays a Happy Chinese New Year presentation in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2020 shows decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in front of the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens take photos of decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens view Lego creations themed on Chinese Lunar New Year celebration inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens pose for a group photo with Lego creations themed on Chinese Lunar New Year celebration inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens take photos with decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens walk under lanterns in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens take photos with decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:50:43
<![CDATA[Performance held to celebrate upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in Malta]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474522.htm

An artist performs Chinese Kongfu during a performance celebrating the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the Mediterranean Conference Centre in Valleta, Malta, Jan 19, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform lion dance during a performance celebrating the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the Mediterranean Conference Centre in Valleta, Malta, Jan 19, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


An artist performs Sichuan Opera face-changing during a performance celebrating the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the Mediterranean Conference Centre in Valleta, Malta, Jan 19, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:47:03
<![CDATA[Chinese dancers perform in Israel to celebrate Chinese New Year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474519.htm

Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

The Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater in the Central Israeli city of Tel Aviv was crowded with audience enjoying the Chinese dance drama Shi Feng on Monday evening.

The dance drama, performed by dancers of China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater as part of the celebrations for the upcoming Chinese New Year, injected the air of joy into the Year of the Rat which will start on Jan. 25.

Shi Feng, which refers to the spirit of Chinese intellectuals, has served as the cornerstone of traditional Chinese culture. The dance drama expressed the spirit characterized by benevolence, righteousness, manners, wisdom and trustworthiness.

Integrating with Chinese classical and modern dance, the performance was welcomed warmly by Israeli audience. The Chinese dance drama will continue to be performed on Tuesday evening to satisfy the demand of more Israeli audience.


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

"The dance performance is very amazing and we are purely enjoyed," said Liat Pardo, a 28-year-old Israeli dancer.

Pardo told Xinhua that she was surprised by the superb dancing techniques of Chinese dancers and hopes to have the opportunity to appreciate Chinese dance in China.

The 40-year-old Rami Yifrach was also moved by the Chinese dance drama.

"Very well-performed and it represents Chinese traditional culture very well," he said.

The dance drama conveyed the morals of Chinese culture like justice and integrity through dancers' movement, Yifrach told Xinhua.


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

A total of three Chinese artist groups participate in the series of celebrations for the upcoming Chinese New Year held in Israel, said Tao Chen, director of China Cultural Center in Tel Aviv.

Prior to the Shi Feng dance drama, a martial arts troupe from Wudang Mountain, known as a traditional center for the teaching and practice of martial arts located in Central China's Hubei province, demonstrated the Chinese martial arts for Israelis from Jan 16 to Jan 18.

Chinese famous dancer Yang Liping would bring her version of Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, where Yang integrates Chinese and Western cultures by using a lot of oriental images, according to Tao.

The celebrations for the Chinese New Year in Israel have been held for 12 consecutive years, Tao told Xinhua.


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:26:48
<![CDATA[Chinese, Romanian musicians perform in Bucharest to celebrate upcoming Spring Festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474520.htm

A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, wowed an audience on Monday evening as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year.

For two hours, the orchestra, led by Chinese pianist Wang Yalun, bamboo flute player Wei Sijun as well as Romanian pan flute player Gheorghe Zamfir, charmed the audience with their considerable virtuosity.

At the start of the concert, Chinese Ambassador to Romania Jiang Yu highlighted the significance of the Chinese Spring Festival, or lunar new year.

Some 800 people enjoyed the performance at the concert hall decorated with Chinese lanterns. Among the audience were musicians, experts of think-tanks, academics as well as foreign diplomats and ambassadors in Bucharest.

Lorica Ivaner, a retired teacher, was dressed in red as is traditional for the Chinese New Year. This marks the fourth time she is visiting such a concert, and she remembered perfectly all the details from last year's concert.


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

Adriana Radulescu, a lawyer, said that she would never miss an opportunity to go to China-themed events because she admires China a lot.

"I know China and I admire both its old civilization and what China is doing at present," she said, adding that "China has a culture of work, the ambition to achieve outstanding things and to create something for mankind. They (the Chinese) are very hard-working."

Andrei Licaret, a famous Romanian pianist, came for the first time to the concert. He has worked with Chinese musicians in Romania many times.

The concert included Bela Bartok's Romanian Folk Dances, Concerto for Bamboo Flute and Orchestra by Guo Wenjing, Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Alexander Borodin's Polovtsian Dances from Prince Igor and the Forest Dance by Gheorghe Zamfir.

Long Yu, the conductor, expressed his happiness to perform in Romania. "We are all very happy to be in Romania today... We are also happy to have the chance to learn about Romanian music."

The entire concert was a great success and received thunderous applause in the end. There was even an encore.


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Romanian pan flute player Gheorghe Zamfir performs with China Philharmonic Orchestra during a concert hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Chinese pianist Wang Yalun plays the piano with China Philharmonic Orchestra during a concert hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Bamboo flute player Wei Sijun performs with China Philharmonic Orchestra during a concert hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-22 14:26:02
<![CDATA[Hungary stages New Year Concert in Shanghai]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474518.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The consulate general of Hungary in Shanghai presented a New Year Concert to a packed audience at Moore Memorial Church on Jan 21, featuring one of Hungarian’s top sopranos Erika Miklosa and her partner Istvan Horvath.

A member of the Hungarian State Opera until 1999, Miklosa was known for her soprano roles as Adele from Die Fledermaus, Gilda from Rigoletto and Konstanze from Die Entführung aus dem Serail. Since 2004, she is regularly featured on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

Horvath made his debut in the role of Count Almaviva in Rossini's The Barber of Seville in Miskolc. He has been a soloist with the Hungarian State Opera since 2010. In addition to appearances and recitals in Hungary, he has sung across Europe, North America and South America.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

This is the fifth New Year concert the Huangaran consulate has hosted at Moore Memorial Church, a historic landmark in downtown Shanghai. Established in 1887, the church was designed by Hungarian-Slovak artitect Laszlo Hudec, who was Shanghai’s master builder when he worked in the city between 1918 and 1945.

Captions: Hungarian opera singers Erika Miklosa (left) and Istvan Horvath take the stage at Moor Memorial Church for a New Year Concert hosted by the consulate general of Hungary in Shanghai on Jan 21.

This is the fifth year the Hungarian New Year concert has taken place at Moore Memorial Church, a historic landmark in downtown Shanghai designed by Hungarian-Slovak artitect Laszlo Hudec.

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2020-01-22 14:08:58
<![CDATA[Lunar New Year celebrations held in Singapore]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474517.htm

People perform the "Golden Pyro Dragon Dance" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]


People perform the "Golden Pyro Dragon Dance" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]


People perform "The Story of Nian" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]


People perform "The Story of Nian" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:04:14
<![CDATA[Festive China: Spring Festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/22/content_1474501.htm

The first day of the first lunar month is Spring Festival, the beginning of a new year for China. Spring Festival for the Year of the Rat falls on Saturday.

Spring Festival is China's biggest extravaganza and a day for family reunion. Being around family members at the turn of the year is a vital ritual for the Chinese people.

Watch this episode of Festive China to find out more.

Festive China is a series of short clips that focus on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes,and how they are manifested in today's China.

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2020-01-22 08:43:03
<![CDATA[Beijing restaurant celebrates Chinese New Year traditions]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474427.htm

Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

More than 100 local residents have joined in traditional Chinese New Year activities, such as writing Chinese couplets, at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in the capital since mid-January.

The idea is to carry on traditional Chinese culture and folk customs, says Jia Wenyu, an employee at the restaurant, which has five locations across Beijing.

"In the past, people wrote couplets by hand, but now most couplets are printed, with some not even up to standards," Jia says.

"We want to bring back authentic folk customs for Chinese New Year."

The event has received an active response from Beijing residents, especially among seniors, and will last until Jan 23. All the couplets made will be given to diners and workers in the neighborhood.

Experts have also been invited to impart to young people knowledge of the old ways of celebrating.


Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-20 15:52:29
<![CDATA[Bonsai exhibition brightens Summer Palace]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474425.htm

A visitor takes photos of a plum blossom bonsai.[Photo by Jiang Dong/ chinadaily.com.cn]

A bonsai exhibition displaying plum blossom and wintersweet varieties opened in Summer Palace on Monday to welcome the Spring Festival.

About 100 bonsai trees have been showcased for the exhibition, and many of them are over 100 years old. Some off-season floral varieties, like peonies and magnolias, have also joined the exhibition, thanks to horticultural technology.

Visitors to the exhibition can also enjoy oolong tea and fortune cookies in the exhibition area. The exhibition will last until Feb 2.

Plum blossoms and wintersweets used to be widely planted in the Summer Palace, the former royal resort during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), according to historical records, and Emperor Qianlong (1711-99) wrote many poems dedicated to these blossoms.


Children draw sketches of a bonsai during the exhibition.[Photo by Jiang Dong/ chinadaily.com.cn]


A wintersweet bonsai on display. [Photo by Wang Kaihao/chinadaily.com.cn]


Visitors enjoy oolong tea while viewing the bonsai. [Photo by Jiang Dong/ chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-20 15:10:02
<![CDATA[Folklore performances presented across China ahead of Lunar New Year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474423.htm

Artists perform Shehuo folk dance during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Jingxingkuang District of Shijiazhuang city, North China's Hebei province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


A dough-modelling craftswoman teaches children to make dough modelling during a folklore festival held at Xinanli historical culture blocks in Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Members of an art troupe rehearse the traditional Yangge dance for the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at a community in Lanshan District of Linyi city, East China's Shandong province, Jan 19, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform lion dance during a folklore festival held at Xinanli historical culture blocks in Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform folk dance during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Huancui District in Weihai city, East China's Shandong province, Jan 19, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Members of an art troupe rehearse the traditional Yangge dance for the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at a community in Lanshan District of Linyi city, East China's Shandong province, Jan 19, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform dragon dance during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Zhongcun village of Luting Township in Yuyao city, East China's Zhejiang province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Children perform kung fu during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Longquansi village of Baofeng county in Pingdingshan city, Central China's Henan province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-20 11:19:38
<![CDATA[Several art groups from Wuhan bring performances to Belgium]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474421.htm

An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-20 10:23:18
<![CDATA[Disney celebrates Chinese New Year as 'Year of the Mouse']]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474419.htm

Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020. Disney has embraced the Lunar New Year and is happily transforming "The Year of the Rat" into "The Year of the Mouse" -- an opportunity that only comes around once every twelve years.[Photo/Xinhua]

Disney's California Adventure Park was alive on Friday with fat red lanterns with decorative gold tassels waggling from the parapets, festive red banners fluttering from the lampposts, Chinese-themed tablecloths sporting an Asian-style Mickey Mouse silhouette, and even a magnificent display of Chinese fireworks. Chinese culturally-themed performances featured exotic dragon dances and martial arts and thrilled American spectators.

Disney has embraced the Lunar New Year and is happily transforming "The Year of the Rat" into "The Year of the Mouse" -- an opportunity that only comes around once every twelve years. Their California Adventure Park in Anaheim has been transformed as well, with a colorful Lunar New Year theme that has turned the park into a sea of red and gold -- the Chinese New Year's traditional colors -- and a wonderland of festive Asian holiday cheer.

The Chinese New Year, celebrated in most of Asia as the Lunar New Year, falls early this year on Jan 25. It is based on a 12-year Zodiac cycle of characters, with 2020 being the Year of the Rat.


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

During the 24 days of this multicultural celebration which started on Friday, guests of the park will enjoy exciting live entertainment and musical performances, including "Mulan's Lunar New Year Procession" and the return of the heartwarming "Hurry Home -- Lunar New Year Celebration" prior to the "World of Color" nighttime spectacular. They will also enjoy new menus of Asian-themed fare, like Shrimp Fried Rice with Garlic Edamame, Char Su Pork Bao, and many others.

Thousands of visitors flooded into the park on Friday to enjoy the Lunar New Year festivities and partake of fun activities, with tables of little blonde American girls sitting side-by-side with raven-haired Chinese darlings having fun coloring Chinese fans, where eight-year-old Olinia told Xinhua she isn't really into Disney princesses, so she loved drawing Mulan, her favorite strong heroine.

There was also Chinese-style brush-painting calligraphy and a Wishing Wall made of human hopes written on decorative mouse-shaped cardboard disks and hung together on strings.

Gary Maggetti, general manager of Pixar Pier, Park Banquets and Festivals, told Xinhua, "It's been such a labor of love for us to research and work with our internal resource groups to understand the correct way to celebrate Chinese New Year and add some Disney playfulness. When you enter here, the vibe, the feeling, and the celebration makes you feel immersed in it."


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

Carla Carlile, show director for creative entertainment at Disney resort, started working on the Lunar New Year Project many years ago at Disneyland and then it moved across the street to Disney's California Adventure Park and expanded dramatically.

"I love working with all the Asian community groups and on the Mulan procession," she told Xinhua in an exclusive interview on Friday. "And having authentic Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese performers. We've mixed our Disney magic with authentic culture so for our Lunar New Year's celebration, our Disney characters are dressed up."

And she's not kidding. Alvin and the Chipmunks, Goofy, The Three Little Pigs are part of the New Year's celebration and of course Disney's Chinese heroine, Mulan, leads the Mulan Procession with her friendly dragon guardian, Mushu, by her side.

Mulan's procession includes Asian drummers, exotic fan and ribbon dancers, martial artists, a large rippling lucky dragon, and the musical stylings of The Melody of China, a premier Chinese musical ensemble performing in the park during the Chinese New Year holidays.

Six-year-old Sophia gleefully told Xinhua, "I loved the dragon the best!" But her sister, four-year-old Jessica, protested, "No, no, I loved the dancing ribbons best."


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

Brooke, a five-year-old local American kid in a red silk dress has fallen in love with all things Chinese. "I love everything! Especially my pretty dress and Chinese food."

Myra from Downy, browsing the stalls for Chinese merchandize, told Xinhua, "My Mom is a schoolteacher and she hangs these Chinese decorations up in the classroom to teach her kids about Chinese traditions and culture. She couldn't come, so I'm buying for her."

As the natural ambassadors for the Year of the Mouse, Mickey and Minnie Mouse glammed up the proceedings with their gorgeous new Chinese-style costumes, designed by haute couture award-winning designer, Guo Pei.

"Children all over the world love Mickey and Minnie. It's an opportunity for me to express and share Chinese culture to the world through my work," said Guo, an internationally-prominent Chinese fashion designer.

Carlile thinks all Disney's cultural festivals at the resort are important. "They open the doors to folks who haven't experienced these cultures. It's inclusive and open to everyone and it's fun to explore new tastes and experiences," she told Xinhua.


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

Disneyland's head chef of cuisine, Jeremiah Balogh, is responsible for Disney's Park regular menus as well as the special new Asian festival menus.

"As a chef, we are in love with food and we love to see different ingredients and recipes coming together from all cultures and walks of life. "

Maggetti also feels food and culture can bring people together and create harmony, and that celebrating the Chinese New Year gives Disney's guests an opportunity to try new things.

"The feedback from our guests (about the Chinese New Year) has been very warm -- to try something different or to reinforce a family memory. It makes Chinese culture more accessible to Americans and is an invitation for Chinese visitors to come visit Disneyland too," he said with a smile.


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-20 09:38:00
<![CDATA[Performers who made their mark last year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474417.htm

Pu Shu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

One of the few Chinese singer-songwriters who manages to be both popular and keep a low profile. In 1999, the self-taught Pu rose to instant fame after releasing his debut album, I Went to 2000. His best-known hits, such as New Boys, The Flowers and Journey, are still popular today. In 2003, after releasing his second album, Life Like Summer Flowers, Pu withdrew from the limelight. Few artists can make a successful return after years away from the scene. But in 2018, Pu came back with a new album, Orion, which won commercial and critical acclaim. In summer last year, he toured nationwide and appeared on the popular reality television show The Big Band.


Jay Chou. [Photo provided to China Daily]

After a long wait, the Taiwan singer launched his latest single, Won't Cry, and a surprise video at 11 pm on Sept 16. By 3:30 pm the next day, the song, written by Chou and Vincent Fang, and which also features Taiwan pop-rock band Mayday's lead vocalist Ashin, had taken 20 million yuan ($2.81 million), a record for digital music sales in China, with each download costing 3 yuan. Since Chou, 40, released his debut album Jay in 2001, he has become one of Mandarin pop's biggest stars. His blend of rhythm and blues, love ballads and rap also often includes classical music and traditional Chinese instruments. In July 2016, he released his 14th studio album, Bedtime Stories.


New Pants. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Chinese indie bands used to appeal to a minority taste. But in the summer, New Pants, a punk rock outfit based in Beijing, gained a large number of new fans after appearing on The Big Band, where it performed a retro blend of disco music and electro-rock songs, wowing audiences. Peng Lei and Pang Kuan, New Pants' lead vocalist and keyboardist, both age 43, are arguably the best-known middle-aged members of the country's indie rock music scene. Classmates at middle school, they started a punk band in 1997, signing with Modern Sky Records, then a lesser-known label, but now the biggest indie music record company in the country. To support their musical ambitions, Peng works as an animator, and Pang as a designer.


Chinese singer Faye Wong performs at the CCTV 2018 Spring Festival Gala, Feb 15, 2018. [Photo/screenshot of the CCTV 2018 Spring Festival Gala]

Wong has always been a headliner. Her songs, including I'm Willing and Dream Love, have straddled the decades and genres. It is virtually impossible to think about the country's pop music scene without coming up with a few of Wong's hits. Her most recent album, To Love, was released back in 2003 and she staged her "final" tour two years later. Last year, the 50-year-old, who had been out of the limelight for years, performed the theme song for the Chinese movie My People, My Country to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China. Although news of a new album and tours have been circulating on the internet, there has been no official announcement. However, it is not the first time that reports have surfaced about a comeback album.


Nine Percent. [Photo/Official Weibo account of Nine Percent]

This popular Chinese boy band broke up on Oct 9, after just 18 months together, causing many fans to voice their disappointment. The group rose to fame in 2018 on the hit reality show Idol Producer, and in November that year released its debut album To the Nines. The nine-member outfit, led by Cai Xukun, who has nearly 30 million followers on his Sina Weibo account, rocked the country's entertainment scene and saw the rise of the "fan economy". More male and female pop groups are now emerging, such as R1SE, an 11-member boy group.

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2020-01-20 07:43:21
<![CDATA['China's Woodstock' raises profile of rock]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474415.htm

Xie Tianxiao performs at the Midi Music Festival in 2017 and at the festival camp at Taihu Lake, Jiangsu province, in 2018. [Photo by Yan Min/For China Daily]

Midi Music Festival marks 20 years of nurturing talent

Nearly 20 years ago, young musicians in 30 Chinese rock bands performed at the Midi School of Music in Shangdi, in northern Beijing's Haidian district. The school, founded in 1993, was China's first school of contemporary music.

Although the bands were relatively unknown, their performances on the first two days of May 2000 attracted about 2,000 fans, filling the 500-seat auditorium and spilling into public spaces outside, where the music could still be heard.

Shan Wei, a 26-year-old music journalist from China Radio International, was told about the shows by friends and spent three hours on the bus to join the audience.

"The shows were free and very crowded. I stood near a window outside the auditorium to watch them," said Shan, noting that one of the bands was Tongue, from the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

"The audience was mainly composed of students from the school, along with rock music lovers from Beijing and nearby areas," Shan said. "Between acts, free beer was provided. I soon made new friends, and we sat on the ground drinking outside the venue.

"The weather was great and the music was very loud. It felt like going to a high school reunion and being part of a huge community."

Later, the two-day event was officially named the Midi Music Festival.


Music fans cheer a band performing at the Midi Music Festival in Suzhou, Jiangsu province, in April 2018. [Photo by Yan Min/For China Daily]

Over the past 19 years, the festival has been staged 38 times in cities including Beijing, Shanghai and Suzhou, Jiangsu province.

Known as "China's Woodstock", a reference to the legendary music festival in the United States, it has propelled many rock bands to fame. Nearly all the country's rock stars have performed at the event, including Cui Jian and Tang Dynasty, one of the first Chinese heavy metal bands.

With this year marking the festival's 20th anniversary, a number of commemorative activities are planned.

Shan, now 45, who was born and raised in Suzhou and graduated from Renmin University of China in 1997 with a degree in political science and international affairs, is now the festival director, having joined the organizing team in 2009.

This year, the event will be staged in cities including Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shenzhen, Guangdong province. Venues in Shandong, Fujian and Hebei provinces will also hold performances, Shan said. Lineups will be announced soon.

"We will not only celebrate the Midi Music Festival's 20th anniversary, but also the country's rock music scene during the past two decades. It's a collective memory," Shan said.

He added that some of the bands who performed at the first festival in 2000 will be invited to join the celebrations, including Tongue, Miserable Faith and Muma, all of which have risen to become leading performers in China.


Xie Tianxiao performs at the Midi Music Festival in 2017 and at the festival camp at Taihu Lake, Jiangsu province, in 2018. [Photo by Yan Min/For China Daily]

In 2009, when the festival celebrated its 10th birthday, it was staged over three days in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province, a small city about three hours from Shanghai by train. It was the first time that the event had been held away from Beijing, and it attracted more than 30,000 fans.

"It was challenging to launch a large-scale music festival in a fresh city, watched by new fans. I remember that many of them traveled to Zhenjiang from Beijing and other parts of the country, making the event that year a great success," Shan said.

He added that due to this, the local government invited the festival to return to the city the following year, when it attracted audiences of 120,000 over four days.

This development saw the festival start to spread its wings further, and last year, cities staging the event included Suzhou, Chengdu and Dezhou, Shandong.


Students attend a guitar course at the Midi School of Music in Beijing. [Photo by Wang Jing/China Daily]

In 2009, Wu Shanshan, an art teacher in Beijing, attended the event when it was staged in Zhenjiang, describing it as "the best outdoor rock festival" she had ever experienced.

She traveled with a group of friends from the capital, not only to see pioneering musician Cui Jian, considered the godfather of China's rock music scene, but to watch Second Hand Rose, a band she never expected to warm to.

"I was never really a fan of Second Hand Rose, but they really rocked that day," Wu said."When they came onto the stage, their outlandish costumes lit up the night and their music featured errenzhuan (a type of folk singing and dancing from Northeast China)."

Wu, who has attended many music festivals, added: "The best thing about going to them is that you can watch your favorite artists and also be surprised by new acts. Basically, as a fan, you're paying for the diversity you're exposed to."


Gao Hu, from Miserable Faith, and other participants perform at the Midi Music Festival in 2015. [Photo by Lyv Ran/FOR CHINA DAILY]

Now, more than 100 music festivals are held nationwide every year, offering rock bands more opportunities to perform. The younger generation of music lovers is more open to different styles and can also afford to travel overseas to attend performances.

Shan said:"The rock music scene is getting better and more diverse. The Midi Music Festival is not only the oldest in China, but also injects new blood by discovering and inviting emerging bands to perform."

In 2010, an offshoot of the festival, the Midi Kids Band Competition was staged, aimed at discovering and showcasing child bands from across the country.

In 2018, Cloud, a seven-piece band formed by children from Xichang, Sichuan, with an average age of 12, stood out at the competition. Last year, the band performed reggae at the Midi Music Festival in Suzhou and also appeared at the Wild Mint Festival in Moscow, Russia, at the end of June.

Shan said the Midi Music Festival's success owes a lot to the Midi School of Music.

Now located in Changping district, northern Beijing, the school is attended by about 400 students from across the country. Founded by Zhang Fan, who is still its president, it is considered the "Whampoa (Huangpu) Military Academy of rock music", a reference to one of the country's best-known modern military institutions.


Gao Hu, from Miserable Faith, and other participants perform at the Midi Music Festival in 2015. [Photo by Lyv Ran/FOR CHINA DAILY]

Gao Hu, lead vocalist and songwriter with Miserable Faith, one of the country's most popular indie bands, said:"Many bands have been formed at the school, but 20 years ago we didn't have much opportunity to perform onstage, which was depressing. The school offered us a chance to realize our dreams."

Gao became interested in rock music during high school, teaching himself to play guitar. In 1997, he began studying at the Midi School of Music, where he met Zhang Jing, now the band's bassist. Miserable Faith was founded two years later.

"We lived in a place called Shucun, near the school, which was also home to many of the other students. Lots of bands were bursting on to the music scene. We loved different styles," Gao said, adding that the rent was 200 yuan a month.

Last summer, the popular reality show The Big Band brought Chinese indie rock into the mainstream for the first time. Acts such as Miserable Faith, The Face and New Pants appeared on the show, which has built up a large fan base.

Li Guobiao, vice-president of the Midi School of Music, said:"It takes solitude, sleepless nights and even starvation to achieve success as an indie rock band. The success of the show encourages young bands to pursue their dreams."

Roommates Huang Xiangyu and Zhu Yuanwu, both 22, have been studying electronic guitar at the Midi School of Music since 2018.


Li Guoji, deputy principle of the Midi School of Music in Beijing. [Photo by Wang Jing/China Daily]

Zhu, born and raised in Jilin province, said: "I fell in love with rock music when I was 6 years old. I went to a record store in my hometown that sold music by Cui Jian and Black Panther. I instantly loved the songs because the lyrics sounded different and the melodies were full of energy."

To study music in Beijing in the hope of becoming a full-time rock performer, he dropped out of a medical school at home.

"My parents were totally against my idea of learning music. To earn tuition fees, I worked at a local musical instrument store," Zhu said.

Huang also paid his own tuition fees, even though his parents objected to his plans. He said he learned about the Midi School of Music online and paid it a visit before applying to enroll.

Zhu added, "I enjoy the atmosphere at the school, because all the students join it due to their passion for music."

On Dec 27, the school closed for the winter vacation, but neither Zhu or Huang returned home, choosing instead to remain in Beijing to find work to pay for their tuition fees for the next semester.

"Our goal is simple. We practice at least three hours a day, in the hope of making a living from music," Zhu said.

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2020-01-20 07:26:05
<![CDATA[Happy Chinese New Year Grand Parade held in Dubai]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/20/content_1474381.htm

A parade to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year was held in the city center of Dubai on Friday. Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, vice-president and prime minister of the UAE and Ni Jian, Chinese Ambassador to the UAE, along with a number of government officials and royals in the UAE were present at the event. At the same time, tens of thousands of people, including overseas Chinese, visitors and locals attended the gathering and shared the joyously festive atmosphere for the Chinese Lunar New Year celebration.

Li Xuhang, consul general of China in Dubai, delivered a speech and said that the annual parade has become the grandest event to celebrate the Chinese Spring Festival for overseas Chinese in Dubai. He added the parade also can boost people-to-people exchanges between China and the UAE.

It is worth noting that 2019 was a momentous year as it marked the 35th anniversary of bilateral relations between China and the UAE.

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2020-01-20 11:47:33
<![CDATA[26th Int'l Dinosaur Lantern Show opens in Zigong, Sichuan]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/19/content_1474330.htm

Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows illuminated lanterns themed the Belt and Road on the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened Friday night in the city of Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened Friday night in the city of Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened Friday night in the city of Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]


People watch the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province, Jan 17, 2020. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened here Friday night. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-19 15:42:07
<![CDATA[Chinese dough modelling exhibition held in Tokyo]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/19/content_1474328.htm

Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows dough-made figurines of characters in "A Dream of Red Mansions" at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]

What comes to your mind when mentioning dough?

Doughnuts? Dumpling? Or bread? Let's see what Chinese artists can make out of dough! Chinese dough modelling exhibition has kicked off at Japan-China Friendship Center Museum in Tokyo, Japan. The exhibition is held from Jan 18 to Feb 8, 2020.


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a visitor takes photos dough-made figurines of characters in Beijing Opera at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a dough-made Japanese girl at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition at in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a Chinese artist creates a dough modelling art work at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors watch a Chinese artist creating a dough modelling art work at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a visitor enjoys dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors enjoy dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors enjoy dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors enjoy dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-19 15:27:03
<![CDATA[Canada Post unveils Year of Rat stamps and collectibles in Toronto]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/19/content_1474326.htm

Stamp collector Walt Berry shows his collections of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. Canada Post unveiled the Year of the Rat stamps and collectibles in celebration of the upcoming Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat on Thursday. [Photo/Xinhua]


The combined photo provided by Canada Post on Jan 16, 2020 shows the samples of domestic-rate stamp (L) and international-rate stamp of the year of the Rat. [Photo/Xinhua]


Stamp collector Gary Norris shows his collections of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A staff member of Canada Post shows domestic-rate stamps of the year of the Rat at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


The Mayor of Toronto John Tory (2nd R) and one of the designers Albert Ng (1st L) attend the unveiling ceremony of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A man takes photos of the year of the Rat stamps-themed mailbox during the unveiling ceremony of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-19 15:13:53
<![CDATA[Eat beat for Spring Festival dinner]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/19/content_1474324.htm

Green and red chili fish from Sifangsanchuan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

1. Sifangsanchuan

To celebrate the coming Chinese Spring Festival on Jan 24, Sifangsanchuan restaurant launched three festive set menus for groups of four, six and eight to gather and enjoy the holiday. The green and red chili fish and spicy chicken with red pepper and cashew nut are the highlights, as the mild flavor of the fish and the spiciness of the chicken add a hot flavor to the feast.

2F, No 1 Nansanlitunlu, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-8588-7150


Lobster at Tian Tai Xuan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

2. Tian Tai Xuan

Tian Tai Xuan restaurant in Tianjin has created three special Chinese New Year menus to celebrate the special occasion. Singaporean chef Goh Wooi Cheat's signature dish Buddha Jumps over the Wall soup is the must-try, which includes Australian abalone, dried scallop, sea cucumber, fish maw, matsutake and quail egg.

No 167 Dagubei Road, Heping District, Tianjin. 022-5809-5098


A dish from Park Gyatt Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

3. Park Hyatt Beijing

Two special set menus for Chinese New Year at Park Hyatt Beijing are only available on Jan 24. Each dish has an auspicious meaning, such as good fortune and good luck. The two-color dumplings are a must on the menu and are made with sea cucumber, scallop, shrimp and pork filling. Spicy flavored lobster is another highlight.

No 2 Jianguomeiwai Street, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-8567-1567


Poon chai from Yu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

4. Yu

From Jan 24 to Feb 8, Yu restaurant will launch a special menu with special ingredients for family reunion. From matsutake soup to black truffle mushroom with beef, and from pan-fried shrimp with special sauce to steamed fish with caviar, each dish uses the most seasonal ingredients. Poon Chai, Guangdong's famous casserole, is another specialty for Chinese New Year.

2F, No 83A, Jianguolu, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-5908-8111


Braised fish from Beijing Hotel Nuo. [Photo provided to China Daily]

5. Beijing Hotel Nuo

Beijing Hotel Nuo will serve a Beijing cuisine Chinese New Year Dinner on Jan 24. The dinner starts with eight cold dishes, including four meat dishes and four vegetable dishes. Peking duck is the star, which is roasted in the traditional way and served with handmade pancakes. Wok fried lobster with spring onion and rice cake are also must-try dishes.

No 33 Dongchang'anjie, Dongcheng district, Beijing. 010-8500-4171

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2020-01-19 09:45:43
<![CDATA[Footprints in the snow]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/18/content_1474322.htm

Xiluoqi maintenance crew write on the snow-covered ground "safe trip" in Chinese characters.[Photo/Xinhua]

On Jan 8, the staff of the Xiluoqi maintenance team in Tahe county, Heilongjiang province, carried out work at the 497 kilometer junction of the Nenjiang-Greater Khingan Forest Railway.

Affiliated to China Raiway Harbin Group's Jiagedaqi construction section, the Xiluoqi team is responsible for some of the toughest maintenance work deep inside the most frigid reaches of the Greater Khingan Mountains, where winter temperatures hover below minus 30 C. This remote section of the line can only be reached by train, and no traces of human habitation can be seen for as far as the eye can see.

The 10 staff members here are in charge of maintaining 11.2 kilometers of railway, including a 1,160-meter-long railway tunnel to the "Arctic" Mohe, Xiluoqi Ridge No 2 Tunnel, which is the entrance to the Nenjiang-Greater Khingan Forest Railway thoroughfare.


Workers' dormitory.[Photo/Xinhua]

The living and working conditions here are so harsh that the team can only reach their points on foot, carrying all the tools they need-hammers, shovels, pickaxes and wrenches-to clear snow banks and tunnels and to repair frost damage. Over the course of four hours, they make several trips delivering equipment and cover nearly 13 kilometers by following their own footprints in the snow beside the railway tracks. There is no mobile phone signal in the mountains. The staff have to use a railway phone in the maintenance zone to communicate with the outside world.

There are no fixed meal breaks, but instead the team grab a bite of hot food after they return to their bunks-perhaps the warmest moment of the day. In the face of steep mountains, bitter cold and heavy snow, the Xiluoqi maintenance team tenaciously guard the access to and safety of this remote stretch of rail line.


Maintenance work at the 497 kilometer junction of the Nenjiang-Greater Khingan Forest Railway.[Photo/Xinhua]


A short break in the snow.[Photo/Xinhua]


Xiluoqi Ridge No 2 Tunnel.[Photo/Xinhua]


Maintenance work at the 501 kilometer junction of the railway.[Photo/Xinhua]


Workers wait for a train to pass.[Photo/Xinhua]


De-icing operation in the tunnel.[Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-18 13:09:03
<![CDATA[Honored by rosewood and the printed page]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/18/content_1474320.htm

Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

In early spring of 2015 woodcarving craftsmen on both sides of the Taiwan Straits joined forces to start working on the finest rosewood. More than 20 of them adopted different woodcarving methods, including transparent and hollowed-out engravings, to reproduce Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains, one of the most famous traditional Chinese landscape paintings, in a very special way.

For centuries Chinese academics and historians have regarded the painting by Huang Gongwang (1269-1354) of the mountains in Zhejiang province as a master specimen of traditional landscape painting. Today it is often referred to as one of the top 10 masterpieces of Chinese art.

In the painting the essence of the terrain and landforms on both sides of the Fuchun River are distilled in fine detail. The depiction is dynamic and wild, partly reflecting some of the painting's tumultuous history, one episode of which resulted in its being set on fire by one of its owners intent on taking it with him into the afterlife.

That attempt was thwarted and the painting was saved, but in two pieces. Eventually one half ended up in the Zhejiang Provincial Museum and the other in the Taipei Palace Museum. In June 2011, 360 years after the two pieces went their separate ways, the two scrolls, Remains of Mountains and Fellow Apprentice Wuyong, were reunited in the Taipei Palace Museum for an exhibition that lasted two months.


Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Though the reunion was transient, it spurred the imagination of at least one person to contemplate on how the two parts of the painting could be brought together permanently.

That person was Yao Xiangdong, director of the Oriental Rosewood Furniture Art Museum in Changshu, Jiangsu province, a county-level city under the jurisdiction of Suzhou. For Yao the best medium by which the estranged halves could be remarried was rosewood, not only because his city is known as the hometown of rosewood but also the fact that Suzhou-style woodwork has become a symbol of elegance.

"Restoring the painting in the form of a wood carving is perhaps the best name card for Changshu," he said.

Yao's idea in turn spawned an annual cross-Straits creative design competition whose central figure is Huang Gongwang, and which has now been held three times. In the many award-winning artworks, traditional Chinese cultural elements have been brought to life by young talent on both sides of the Straits, with an emphasis on the modern perspective.


Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

It is part of drive by Changshu to draw on its cultural resources to promote the city's growth, using talent from home and abroad, and at the same time promoting the city's cultural heritage.

On Dec 21 the first Changshu Elite Entrepreneurship Alliance Conference hosted by the Changshu Municipal Committee and the People's Government was held, with the theme "gathering wisdom and building Changshu".

The purpose of the alliance is to pool kinship, nostalgia, and friendship, and to gather talent, wisdom, and capital to build Changshu. The alliance consists of eight zones, three domestic-Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen-and five international-the Belt and Road countries, Japan and South Korea, Europe, the Americas and Australia-each of them headed by a convener.

The alliance will work hand in hand with the city government, and a conference will be held annually at which knowledge and expertise that can help promote Changshu will be pooled.


Kuncheng Lake is one of the key freshwater lakes of Changshu.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"Cultural change accounts for a big part of the city's talent project," said Chen Meilou, vice-president of Jiangsu World Overseas Chinese Entrepreneurs Association.

"Changshu can flourish with sustained commitment to more than just a healthy and friendly economic and investment environment. An effort to understand what motivates talent to stay should be carefully planned to align cultural goals too."

The opening ceremony of the Dai Yi Academic Museum was held in the south square of Changshu Library at the end of October. Dai Yi, 93, director of the National Qing Dynasty History Compilation Committee, hopes to establish a Qing history academic research base there, and Changshu, his hometown, seems to have heard his voice.

Liu Mengxi, a lifelong researcher at the China Academy of Art, said Changshu is a place of culture. The completion of the museum has added a new cultural edge to the city that will play an important role in the development of Changshu's cultural research and the spread of historical culture.


Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Cao Peigen, a research librarian and researcher on the culture and history of book collecting at Changshu Institute of Technology, said that during the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties more than 300 book collectors resided in Changshu, representing more than a tenth of the collectors across the country. Ye Dehui, an expert on the Qing Dynasty, paid tribute to the city in a preface to the book Changshu Gu Family Stone House Bibliography, saying: "A town's achievement in book collecting put it at the summit of the nation."

Anecdotes on collecting books, passed on through families and to others, abound in Changshu. One legend has it that a particular species of bookworm winds its way through the forest of books it inhabits looking for fairies. If it finds and devours fairies three times it gains qi (energy) and is possessed of maiwang, or grand outlook.

In the Ming Dynasty, a man named Zhao Qimei, of Changshu, had a special liking for the word maiwang, so he changed the name of his father's library "Songshi (pine and stone) Room" to "Maiwang Pavilion" to express his passion and love for books.


Shanghu Lake in Changshu is said to have been named after Jiang Shang, a Chinese noble who helped king Wu of Zhou overthrow the Shang Dynasty.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Today Maiwang Pavilion continues to bear remnants from the Ming Dynasty. This three-entry wooden building in Zhao Alley, southwest of Changshu, was listed in the sixth batch of national key cultural relics protection units in 2006.

Another noteworthy book collection relic is the Tieqintongjian (iron guqin, a seven-stringed plucked instrument, and copper sword) Building, in the town of Guli, which has survived 200 years intact.

The owner, the Qu family, collected books and spared little expense in doing so. They also read books, proofread ancient volumes and edited bibliographies allowing knowledge of history and many other things, as well as wisdom, to flourish and to be propagated.

When the Qing army was besieged during the Taiping Rebellion in Changshu in 1862 and searches were conducted house to house, the Qus put their lives at risk to safeguard the books. After New China was founded in 1949 the family, respecting their ancestors' legacy, donated all of their collections to the nation.


Maiwang Pavilion is a three-entry wooden building in Zhao Alley, southwest of Changshu, and was listed in the sixth batch of national key cultural relics protection units in 2006.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Dai Yi says he often overlooks the rapid changes taking place in his hometown. One of the main reasons for the economic growth of Changshu is its rich cultural fabric, the popularity of education and the improvement of civilization, he says.

Changshu's recent library rediscovery event encourages public readers to pay attention to libraries and book distribution points around the city where bibliophiles can borrow books.

Yuyue Study Room in Huancheng East Road is an urban public reading space that locals have nicknamed the "library next door". Sun Yangqing, a reader, says: "I was once sitting inside, with dense trees outside the large glass floor. In the study room, rows and rows of books sat safely between sofas, and with soft music wafting through the air you could only feel blessed to be part of this priceless serenity."


The Yushan Gate on the Yushan Mountain.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Chen of Jiangsu World Overseas Chinese Entrepreneurs Association says: "Innovation and inheritance are not mutually exclusive, which means respecting inheritance does not mean you have to be conservative. Changshu people are well versed in the principle of opening up their minds with the rules of the ancients."

In recent years Changshu has increased investment in public services, and the focus on education has become clear. Thirty-three students from the United World Colleges Changshu have been admitted to Ivy League universities in the past three years, and Kang Chiao International School, Suzhou Education Investment Group, Suzhou Foreign Language School, the First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University and other world-class establishments now have a presence in the city.


Shanghu Lake in Changshu is said to have been named after Jiang Shang, a Chinese noble who helped king Wu of Zhou overthrow the Shang Dynasty.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"We have turned Changshu into a hub that is integrated into the Yangtze River Delta," says the city's Party Secretary, Zhou Qindi.

"Revering culture is the foundation of our city. The skills and talent of Changshu and its people are its greatest wealth, and they represent its future."


For centuries Chinese academics and historians have regarded the painting Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountainsby Huang Gongwang (1269-1354) of the mountains in Zhejiang province as a master specimen of traditional landscape painting.[Photo provided to China Daily]


For centuries Chinese academics and historians have regarded the painting Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountainsby Huang Gongwang (1269-1354) of the mountains in Zhejiang province as a master specimen of traditional landscape painting.[Photo provided to China Daily]


Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountainson rosewood by artisans on both sides of the Taiwan Straits.[Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-18 12:16:25
<![CDATA[TV program attracts youngsters with traditional Chinese culture]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/17/content_1474318.htm

The CCTV youth channel invites children to celebrate the Chinese New Year with fun games. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, has long been treasured as one of the grandest celebrations in Chinese culture. The year of 2020 marks the Year of the Rat, and this year, the CCTV youth channel has launched its seven-episode special program Let's Celebrate the Spring Festival from Saturday.

With a spotlight on traditional culture, it invites children to learn and experience through interesting games, sitcoms, contests and classes.

Zhang Jiaxuan, a 9-year-old living in Hong Kong, is among the first group of young guests on the show who come from Hong Kong and Macao. His interest in Chinese calligraphy blossomed in an early age, inspired by his parents. So the calligraphy game on set turned out to be his favorite.


Children learn Chinese martial arts during the show. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Huang Jiayu, a 12-year-old girl from Macao, also developed a passion for calligraphy. "It requires a lot of patience. You need to be very dedicated to succeed."

Li Linfei, a 6-year-old from Beijing, shared his experience in his first program recording. "As the 'conductor' of the train, my job is to lead the team through the Wild Animal World, and give out the assignments," he said. As he was looking for oracle bone inscriptions, he learned quite a lot about this ancient cultural form.

Imbuing liveliness into education, the seven episodes cover a mixture of fields, varying from Chinese idioms, cuisine and martial arts to the animal zodiac and temple fairs.


Contestants play a game about Chinese idioms. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

For instance, in the Chinese idiom solitaire contest, four children form a team using ink bushes to write down Chinese idioms according to the rules.

As a tradition of the Let's Celebrate the Spring Festival program, every year the Animation Week will be launched with two new productions for young viewers, and will also feature timeless choices such as Big-head Son and Small-head Dad and Cotton Candy and Mother Cloud.


Participants put on costumes and learn about the characters from the classic novel Journey to the West. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"We'd like to portray a Chinese style of animation," said Xu Beibei, chief director of the show. "Ink painting, paper-cutting and shadow puppetry will all be incorporated into the animations. The goal is to reveal the fun and charm of Chinese New Year."

In response to the latest media demands, the program will leap beyond traditional TV episodes, producing audio content, short videos and celebrity vlogs. Audiences have expressed great enthusiasm and curiosity about the show since last December. Many posted merry family photos for the production team ?memories of pasting Spring Festival couplets on the door, making dumplings and having family reunion dinners.


Hosts introduce the best wishes of the Spring Festival couplets to children. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Children learn Chinese martial arts during the show. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-17 16:59:13
<![CDATA[China-Brunei Tourism Year opens in Bandar Seri Begawan]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/19/content_1474287.htm

Dancers perform at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The opening ceremony of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 was held in the Brunei capital of Bandar Seri Begawan on Friday, attended by high-level officials from China and Brunei.

Throughout the year, the two countries will host a wide array of activities, such as exhibitions, forums and world cultural heritage presentations to further enhance cultural and tourism cooperation.

At the opening, Zhang Xu, Chinese vice-minister of Culture and Tourism, said both sides expect a new chapter in tourism cooperation and beyond via the year-long event, and to further promote people-to-people exchanges.


Dancers perform at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Statistics show that China is one of Brunei's largest tourist sources. Brunei received over 65,600 Chinese tourists in 2018, up more than 20 percent compared to 2017.

Haji Ali, Brunei's minister of Primary Resources and Tourism, said he believes that the scale of tourism and cultural exchanges between the two nations will further expand with the diversified events across the year.

The opening was highlighted by performances organized by China Arts and Entertainment Group. It featured artists from both countries performing classical folk tunes and dances.

The China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 is sponsored by the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Brunei's Ministry of Primary Resources and Tourism, and the Chinese embassy in Brunei.


Dancers perform at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Attendees and performers take a group photo at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-19 14:16:31
<![CDATA[China, Italy welcome cultural and tourism feast in 2020]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/17/content_1474270.htm

As part of the major events celebrating the 50th anniversary of the establishment of China-Italy diplomatic ties, the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism will open with a concert at the Auditorium Parco della Musica in Rome on Jan 21, said Chinese and Italian officials in Beijing on Wednesday.

The year-long event will feature nearly 100 cultural and tourism activities in both countries, ranging from performing arts and visual arts to cultural heritage, tourism and creative design.

The grand opening will consist of a star-studded concert bringing together famous Chinese and Italian artists, a China-Italy tourism forum that will convene industry leaders from both China and Italy, and a photo exhibition showcasing world heritages from both countries.

"China and Italy are two representative ancient civilizations in the East and West. We both have 55 UNESCO world heritage sites, tied for first place in the world," Zheng Hao, deputy head of the Bureau of International Exchange and Cooperation of China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism, said at the press conference on Wednesday.  

"Looking back on the past years, all the important cultural cooperation achievements were groundbreaking, such as the long-term exhibitions set up in each other's national museums, the establishment of the China-Italy Cultural Cooperation Mechanism, and the pairing of World Heritage sites from the two sides," he noted.

Zheng Hao (third from left), deputy head of the Bureau of International Exchange and Cooperation of China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and Luca Ferrari (third from right), Italian ambassador to China, attend the press conference in Beijing, Jan 15, 2019. [Photo by Fu Rui/chinadaily.com.cn]

The two nations are promoting the twinning of UNESCO world heritage sites to promote cultural tourism. The West Lake Cultural Landscape in East China's Hangzhou, for example, has established a friendship relation with Italy's City of Verona. The two heritage sites are exploring exchanges and cooperation through co-producing films and exhibition curations.

Chinese artworks will not only be displayed at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice in the upcoming months, but also in famous Italian museums such as the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, according to Zheng.

In the cultural heritage sector, big Chinese museums such as the Palace Museum and the National Museum are working on swap exhibitions with their Italian counterparts.

Zheng Hao,deputy head of the Bureau of International Exchange and Cooperation of China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and Luca Ferrari, Italian ambassador to Beijing, attend the press conference in Beijing, Jan 15, 2019. [Photo by Fu Rui/chinadaily.com.cn]

Talking about Italian art that will be shown in China, Italian ambassador Luca Ferrari told China Daily, "We have some very important Italian museums like Uffizi. It will bring large exhibitions to China." 

Italy has become a popular tourism destination among Chinese tourists in recent years. Statistics show Italy received over 3 million Chinese visitors last year and that number is expected to rise to 4 million in 2020. The ambassador noted Italy appeals to Chinese people in three main areas: art and culture, local people's hospitality and its culinary delights.

"But nowadays, there is also an enormous number of Italian tourists who come to China for its countryside, for its beautiful landscape and cultural heritage," he said.

During the press conference, the event's logo was also unveiled.

Logo of the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-17 15:32:50
<![CDATA[More than 300 pottery figurines from Ming Dynasty on display in Shaanxi]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/17/content_1474251.htm

More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]

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2020-01-17 14:24:44
<![CDATA[Cultural event held in Belarus to celebrate upcoming Chinese New Year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/17/content_1474249.htm

A student displays his paper-cutting artwork, in Minsk, capital of Belarus, on Jan 16, 2020. A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-17 11:55:36
<![CDATA[China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism 2020 set to kick off]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/16/content_1473925.htm

The year 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic ties between China and Italy. To further consolidate Sino-Italian relations and deepen mutual understanding, the China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism 2020 is scheduled to kick off in January. It will cover a wide range of high-level cultural and tourism events between the two countries.

Both China and Italy have a long history and a rich cultural heritage. More people-to-people exchanges between the two countries have been seen in recent years. Statistics show that Italy received over 3 million Chinese visitors last year and the number is expected to rise in 2020.

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2020-01-16 15:29:13
<![CDATA[Japanese jazz maestro Makoto Ozone to perform in Beijing]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/14/content_1473536.htm

Makoto Ozone [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

As part of the 20th "Meeting in Beijing" International Arts Festival, Japanese jazz pianist Makoto Ozone will stage a jazz concert at the National Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday.

The setlist will include both Western classical melodies and Ozone's own compositions such as Bouncing in my new shoes, Asian Dream and Three Wishes.

Majoring in jazz composition and arrangement, Ozone graduated from Berklee College of Music in 1983. The same year, he gave a solo recital at Carnegie Hall in New York City, becoming the first Japanese musician to be exclusively signed to CBS, with the worldwide release of his first album Ozone.

In 2003, he won a Grammy nomination, and has constantly been in the forefront of the international jazz scene, recording and touring with the greats of Chick Corea, Paquito D'Rivera, Branford Marsalis and others. In 2004, he formed the "No Name Horses" band in Japan and has been performing in France, Austria, the US, the UK, Singapore and Japan ever since.


[Photo provided to chinaculture.org]

In recent years, Ozone has also been focusing on works from the classical music repertoire, playing concertos by Mozart, Bernstein and Prokofiev, with major orchestras both in Japan and abroad.

Ozone has won several awards, including the 2018 Shiju-HouShyou award (The Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon) - Japan's highest award to individuals who have made significant contributions to the nation's academic or cultural life.

If you go:
7:30 pm, Jan 19. Concert Hall, No 2,West Chang'an Avenue, Xicheng district, Beijing. 北京市西城区西长安街2? 国家大剧?
Tickets: 80-480 yuan ($10-70)

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2020-01-14 15:05:57
<![CDATA[Revitalizing village through art]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/14/content_1473516.htm

Media and fashion mogul Hung Huang will direct and narrate Come Along with Xiayuan, a documentary focusing on life and people in the Xiayuan village, 50 km to the north of Beijing, where she has lived for more than 20 years. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Having lived in Xiayuan, a centuries-old village some 50 km to the north of Beijing, for more than two decades, Hung Huang, an influential media and fashion figure, admits she never thought of herself being part of it.

Until she decided to shoot Come Along with Xiayuan, a documentary about her neighbors and fellow villagers whom she has had a newfound interest in.

"One day, I suddenly realized that Xiayuan is not an average village you see everywhere in northern China," Hung said at a news briefing on Jan 9 in Beijing. "It is my duty to share with the outsiders the charm and beauty of my village."

Hung also believes Xiayuan might serve as one of the models for villages nationwide. China has about 700,000 villages but many are facing almost the same problem which indicates an uncertain future -- aged villagers dying while young villagers fleeing. "To revitalize Chinese villages through art is a trend that has become ever stronger in China in recent years,?said Hung. "That brings new hope to the village, a fountainhead of culture and civilization.?/p>


Wang Wei, founder of A-Lab, a Beijing-based media company, teams up with Hung to start shooting Come Along with Xiayuan, a 90-episode documentary, to be released on social media platforms as video blogs. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The first artists?village emerged in China in 1990 when artists Ding Fang, Tian Bin, Fang Lijun and Yi Ling came together and lived in rented houses in the Fuyuanmen village near the Old Summer Palace. Now there are reportedly about 3000 artist’s villages or art zones of various sizes and types in China.

Situated in the Xingshou township of Changping district, the Xiayuan village boasts a history dating back to the Tang Dynasty (618-907) and is known as a tourist hotspot for its culture and landscape. Since late 1990s, it has attracted over 300 artists and artisans from across the country who opened their studios and settled down, renting houses from local farmers.

"When artists met villagers and learned to live together, their interaction and collaboration have since spawned a new kind of local culture, which is vital for the sustainable development a village," said Wang Wei, founder of A-Lab, a Beijing-based media company, who has teamed up with Hung to start a 90-episode documentary which will be released on social media platforms as video blogs.


Some resident-artists from the Xiayuan village attend a news briefing for Come Along with Xiayuan, a documentary which delves into the inside stories of the well-known artists village in suburban Beijing, on Jan 9. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

With Wang acting as the producer and Hung as the director and narrator, the documentary project will run through May when an arts festival kicks off in Xiayuan, better known as the Xiayuan Artists Village for Tourists.

"Besides my work in the media and fashion industries, I will pay visits to fellow villagers and resident-artists and dig out their interesting stories," Hung said.

The documentary project has got warm support from the villagers and the resident-artists. Some even delivered improvised music at the news briefing while some others sent warm welcome.

"Living in Xiayuan gives one inner peace," said Zhao Gang, one of the resident-artists who attended the news briefing. "Come and become a villager at least for one day and I am sure you will fall in love with our village."

Xiayuan has been welcoming visitors since 2003. Many artists open their studios every day from 2-4:30 pm since May 2003. Tourists may spend their time enjoying art, music, food and culture and talking with local farmers and artists, said Lao La, a resident-artist who creates oil paintings and operates a popular restaurant.

 

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2020-01-14 10:55:28
<![CDATA[Give rats a chance to accompany you through 2020]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/13/content_1473514.htm

By Molady [Photo/tmall.com]

Steal, bite and destroy, rats don't have a good reputation in most countries.

In 1958, the grey creatures were listed as one of the "Four Harms" in China.

However, they are more beloved in two-dimension world, as they are the first of 12 Chinese zodiac animals, and almost everyone knows Disney's Mickey Mouse and Jerry from the Tom and Jerry series.

In 2020, the Year of the Rat will fall on Jan 25, the start of another 12-year cycle.

To celebrate the Lunar New Year and bring yourself good luck, a piece of auspicious accessory is a must-have.

Gold and silver ones are good choice for cold seasons to light up your whole ensemble.


By The Beast. [Photo/thebeastshop.com]


By Chow Tai Fook. [Photo/ctfmall.com]


By Chow Tai Fook. [Photo/ctfmall.com]


By Swarovski.[Photo/tmall.com]

You can also choose cuter ones to give yourself a different look.


Mouse and cheese shaped earrings, by Say Hi. [Photo/tmall.com]


By Swarovski.[Photo/tmall.com]


By Mymiss. [Photo/tmall.com]


If you are tea lover, a rat-shaped tea pet is a good purchase.

Mouse shaped tea pets, by Heniyouyuan.[Photo/tmall.com]


Mouse shaped tea pet, by Zidian. [Photo/tmall.com]


Mouse shaped tea pet, by Cishen. [Photo/tmall.com]


Porcelain mice. [Photo/tmall.com]


Tom and Jerry candle, by The Beast. [Photo/thebeastshop.com]

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2020-01-13 15:27:07
<![CDATA['Three-Body' trilogy inspired exhibition debuts in Shanghai]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/13/content_1473512.htm

Liu Cixin, the award-winning author of the trilogy, attended the global debut. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy, China's best-selling science-fiction novels, made its global debut in Shanghai on Friday.

Hugo Award winner Liu Cixin, the trilogy's author, described the exhibition as "rendering to the audience the true feeling of being surrounded in the restored scenarios in the books."

The organizer said that the exhibition is dedicated to restoring classic scenes and science fiction stories in books with frontier technological approaches after one year's preparation, gathering the efforts of 27 curators and artists from around the world.


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"We strived to present the fabulous experience that the magic and magnificence of the trilogy rendered to its readers in a spiritual world with three-dimensional senses combining visual, audio and video interactions," said Shi Fei, board chairman of Shanghai Zun'an Tongheng Cultural and Creative Development Co Ltd, the exhibition organizer.

The exhibition covers nearly 2,000 square meters spanning three floors in Shanghai Tower, the world's second tallest building and China's tallest, in the Lujiazui Finance Area. It replicated six iconic scenarios in the trilogy, of which the first book, The Three-Body Problem, won the Hugo Award in 2015.

Liu said he was impressed by the scenarios, including water drips, the three-body planets, the severe winter and the chaotic era, in the exhibition, saying they were very close to what he had in his mind when writing the novel.


The exhibition features the scenario of water drips in the trilogy. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"I was also impressed by the curators' creative and interactive ways to present the words in the books. As a writer who works with words, I felt for the first time that words are becoming alive, empowered by high technologies," he said.

The exhibition will be open until February 2021 and many other Chinese cities, such as Beijing, Shenzhen, Taiyuan, Xi'an, Wuhan, Shenyang and Ningbo, have expressed strong interest in hosting the exhibition, Shi said.  Japan's Tokyo and Osaka also are interested.

The trilogy has been published in at least 25 foreign languages and has sold over 20 million copies. Celebrity fans of the books included former US president Barack Obama and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy  made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy  made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy  made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-13 15:00:22
<![CDATA[Exhibition of donated art to celebrate Chinese New Year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/13/content_1473510.htm

A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Of the 110,000 artworks in the collection of the National Art Museum of China, nearly 30 percent were donated by artists, their families and private collectors with the hope of benefiting more and more members of the public.

To mark their generous contributions to enriching the national art collection, the National Art Museum will open a special exhibition, A Tribute to Donors, on Jan 19. The show will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations it has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019.

The exhibition through March 28 is meant to offer visitors a visual treat during Chinese New Year celebrations.

Works on show will include classic Chinese ink paintings and calligraphy, oil works, lithographs, sculptures and photographs.

The exhibition will offer a glimpse of the brilliance of ancient Chinese art, trace the evolution of Chinese art in the 20th century and review the cultural exchanges between China and the world.


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-01-13 11:28:00
<![CDATA[Beijing exhibition reviews artist's sensitivity and diligence]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/09/content_1473506.htm

Autumn Moon In The Sky, 260x170x80cm, mixed materials, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]

Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006 with a display of his signature installations and sculptures of momentum, as well as sketches, photos and videos to show the cultural roots of his works, tracing back to his hometown in South China's Fujian province.

The exhibition, held at Beijing Minsheng Art Museum, shows Chen's sensitivity to the dramatic social changes over the past four decades, during which he evolved from a village boy and art student to one of the leading figures of China's contemporary art community.

His works, which often depict surrealist scenes, reflect individual experiences and also a collective feeling of social developments while addressing emerging issues such as overconsumption.

The exhibition also celebrates Chen's productivity at work, trying on various mediums and styles and bringing his imposing art to not only art museums but also public spaces.


Ark of Transcendence, 512×400× 420 cm, stainless steel, 2012 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Inheritance, 236x118x80cm, stainless steel, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Man, 390x150x260cm, mixed materials, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Sitting Meditation, 192x120x82cm, mixed materials, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Another Wonderland, 386x250x330cm, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Chen Wenling and two dancers pose before one of Chen's works. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Noted sculptor Sui Jianguo at the exhibition opening. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-09 15:48:27
<![CDATA[Chinese spinoff drama on royal affairs debuts on Netflix]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/09/content_1473504.htm

Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31.

In the summer of 2018, Story of Yanxi Palace garnered more than 18 billion "clicks" to top all online Chinese dramas that year.

Its producer and scriptwriter Yu Zheng tells China Daily the latest spinoff has subtitles in 23 foreign languages, including English, Thai and Hindi, and is the first such Chinese series to be streamed on a foreign platform before being released in China.

The new tale takes place around 15 years after the end of the first one, which unfolds through 70 episodes to chronicle the rise of Wei Yingluo, a low-born royal maid who overcomes palace intrigue to be crowned the "imperial noble consort" to Emperor Qianlong (1711-99) of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

As the hostess of Forbidden City, China's imperial palace, and the most powerful woman in the king's harem, Wei ?a role reprised by actress Wu Jinyan ?is seen encountering a new crisis in the latest series: Her princess daughter is urged by a Mongolian prince to cancel their engagement, as he believes the rumor that the young woman is spoiled and willful.

To clear her reputation and win back her love, the princess sneaks out of the palace to embark on an adventure, discovering that the situation is more complicated than she had estimated.


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"I have had the Princess Adventures story in my mind for a long time. It's sort of a tale that is more relatable for modern youngsters. The title's protagonist is an adorable and straightforward woman. When she falls for someone, she takes action without hesitation," says Yu, 41.

The statistics from the television market company CSM Media Research show that Chinese TV series ran an average of 42 episodes per production in 2018.

Considering that dramas on Netflix are much shorter, Princess Adventures recounts "a comparatively simple story" to be told in just six episodes, Yu adds.

"Most domestic production companies are still exploring how to better sell Chinese stories abroad. I hope this drama demonstrates the beauty of Chinese culture to foreign audiences," Yu says.


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-09 14:49:56
<![CDATA[Contemporary art show looks for 'a stitch in time']]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/13/content_1473240.htm

The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Today's Documents, a major exhibition of international contemporary art held every three years by Beijing's Today Art Museum, has committed to presenting the experimental advances of Chinese art and also the evolution of global works.

Co-curated by Huang Du and Jonathan Harris, the fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently.

The exhibition, first held in 2007, teams up 37 artists from across the world whose works on show are grounded on topics such as the global imbalance of economic development, refugee crisis, terrorism, cyber attacks and environmental deterioration which are threatening human society.

The exhibition will run until March 15.


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-13 09:48:09
<![CDATA[Dance drama featuring Silk Road love story makes US debut]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/10/content_1473238.htm

Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]

A Chinese dance drama featuring a sad yet beautiful love story on the ancient Silk Road made its US debut in Lincoln Center on Thursday.

Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.

The young couple, artist Mogao and his beloved Yueya, could not stay together because of the objection from Yueya's father, the Great General of Dunhuang. During a violent confrontation between the couple and the general, Yueya sacrificed her own life to save Mogao, and her body then transformed into an eternal spring running through the desert.

With great grief, Mogao carried on with his artistic journey and finished a marvelous mural on the wall of Mogao Caves, a treasure house of Buddhist art which is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site now.


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]

Apart from the story itself and the dancers' excellent skills, the stage setting and costumes have made the drama more eye-catching and convincing, as Dunhuang is bestowed with a unique landscape and social convention at a crossroads of trade, culture and religion.

"If some American people feel like traveling to Dunhuang after seeing our show, it would mean we have done a good job in cultural exchanges," said Chen Weiya, chief director of the drama.

The Tales of the Silk Road was created in 2000 by the renowned Lanzhou Song & Dance Theatre from northwestern China's Gansu province, where Dunhuang is located.

During the past 19 years, it has toured around China and more than 10 countries with a total of over 1,300 performances.

Produced by the China Arts and Entertainment Group (CAEG), the drama will be performed in Lincoln Center on Jan 9-12.


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-10 16:27:41
<![CDATA[Colorful lanterns displayed in Jiangsu]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/10/content_1473236.htm

Tourists view colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 8, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns in Nantong, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns in Nantong, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Tourists view colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 8, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-10 15:57:15
<![CDATA[<EM>Three Phantoms</EM> musical debuts in China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/10/content_1473234.htm

The musical Three Phantoms, which features Broadway musical stars Earl Carpenter, John Owen-Jones and Jeremy Secomb, made its China debut at the FANCL Arts Center in Shanghai on Jan 9. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The musical Three Phantoms, which features three top actors from Broadway ?Earl Carpenter, John Owen-Jones and Jeremy Secomb ?who have played the phantom in the The Phantom of the Opera, made its China debut at the FANCL Arts Center in Shanghai on Jan 9.

The concert, in which the three stars perform a series of popular and classical songs from the repertoires of The Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables and Beauty and the Beast, will run on a nightly basis in the Shanghai theatre through Jan 12.

First introduced in 2009, the concert has been watched by more than 120,000 audiences around the world.

The musical Three Phantoms, which features Broadway musical stars Earl Carpenter, John Owen-Jones and Jeremy Secomb, made its China debut at the FANCL Arts Center in Shanghai on Jan 9. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-10 12:52:48
<![CDATA[Photographer reveals wintry world of white in NE China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/10/content_1473232.htm

An "Armed" Man, at the Huifa River, Jilin province, January 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]

Heilongjiang River Valley in Northeast China is the most bitterly cold region in China, with long and frigid winters. The rivers and lakes start to freeze in November each year and begin to melt in April the next year. Though the lakes and rivers lose their vitality during this time, people get the chance to become closer to them.

Meanwhile, a more harsh reality is that the economy and population here keep declining, resulting in cities which appear silent and lonely.

This series of photos taken by Zhao Zhi, who now lives and works as a teacher at a college in Harbin city of Heilongjiang province, conveys the photographer's nostalgia. Zhao started creating the photo series in December 2015.


Central Island, at the Songhuajiang River, Heilongjiang province, February 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Wedding on Snowfield, at the Songhuajiang River, Jilin province, January 2018. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Kite Festival at Snowfield, at Lianhuan Lake, Heilongjiang province, February 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


People enjoy snow and ice at the Songhuajiang River, Huachuan county, Heilongjiang province, February 2016. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Pouring Water Froze into Ice Instantly, at the Heilongjiang River, Heilongjiang province, February 2018. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Ice Climbing, at Linjiang city, Jilin province, January 2019. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Winter Swimming, at the Nenjiang River, Heilongjiang province, February 2018. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Dog Pulling the Sled, at the Songhuajiang River, Jilin province, January 2019. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Herder and Cattle, at the Muleng River, Heilongjiang province, February 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Fisherman, at the Songhuajiang River, Harbin city, Heilongjiang province, December 2015. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Snow Town, at the Songhuajiang River, Jilin province, January 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]

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2020-01-10 10:43:38
<![CDATA[Actors perform at celebration of Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/10/content_1473230.htm

Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]


Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]


Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]


Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-10 10:35:42
<![CDATA[Shanghai Ballet to bring its Swan Lake on tour in US]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/09/content_1473228.htm

Shanghai Ballet will make its debut at the Lincoln Center in New York with four performances of Swan Lake from Jan 17 to 19. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Shanghai Ballet will make its debut at the Lincoln Center in New York with four performances of Swan Lake from Jan 17 to 19.

The 108-piece touring team left Shanghai for its US tour on Jan 10. After New York, the company will head to Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky to present four shows of an original Chinese ballet production, The Butterfly Lovers.

In New York, the orchestra of the New York City Ballet will play live music accompaniment for the performance of Swan Lake.

Choreographed by Derek Deane, Shanghai Ballet's Swan Lake features 48 swans compared to the usual 16 or 28. Since its premiere in 2015, the ballet has been shown dozens of times in Europe.


Shanghai Ballet will make its debut at the Lincoln Center in New York with four performances of Swan Lake from Jan 17 to 19. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Presenting a repertoire of classical ballet and an original production of a Chinese tale, Shanghai Ballet hopes to "present the strong capabilities and artistic style of our company to the sophisticated audiences in the US," according to Xin lili, director of Shanghai Ballet.

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2020-01-09 18:21:40
<![CDATA[2020 Happy Chinese New Year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/10/content_1472741.htm ]]> 2020-01-10 15:38:02 <![CDATA[Olympic theme highlighted at 2020 'Meet in Beijing' arts festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/09/content_1472554.htm

Chinese and Japanese musicians perform under the baton of Japanese conductor Michiyoshi Inoue in Beijing on Jan 6, 2019. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

With the chorus of Ode to Joy echoing in the concert hall of the National Center for the Performing Arts, the opening concert of the 2020 Meet in Beijing Arts Festival reached its climax on Monday night, kicking off a month-long extravaganza of music, plays, art and cultural activities in the capital.

Through Feb 4, theatergoers and art lovers in Beijing will be exposed to more than 60 performances and three theme exhibitions presented by more than 700 artists from 12 countries and regions. From music and art exhibitions to plays, dance shows and gourmet festivals, the 20th edition of the annual "Meet in Beijing" event will have classical and contemporary cultural elements, as well as Olympic-themed activities, on offer.

The opening concert was jointly staged by the Beijing Symphony Orchestra and Tokyo Opera Singers. Under the baton of Japanese conductor Michiyoshi Inoue, Chinese tenor Shi Yijie, Chinese mezzo-soprano Zhu Huiling, Japanese baritone Takaoki Onishi and Japanese soprano Eri Takahashi joined together to perform the choral finale. Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No 9 was one of the masterworks played at the concert to celebrate Beethoven's 250th birthday.


All-female musical theater troupe Takarazuka Revue's The Light of Sword and Love - The Women Who Loved Napoleon will be staged at the Beijing Tianqiao Performing Arts Center from Jan 10 to 12. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Japan, host of the 2020 Summer Olympics, is the featured country for this year's Meet in Beijing. A wide array of Japanese shows as well as food festivals will be held across the Chinese capital, including shamisen musician Hiromitsu Agatsuma's crossover concert on Jan 18, jazz pianist Makoto Ozone's jazz concert on Jan 19 and all-female musical theater troupe Takarazuka Revue's The Light of Sword and Love - The Women Who Loved Napoleon from Jan 10 to 12.

In addition to Japanese arts, other foreign highlights include French pianist Richard Clayderman's New Year concert on Jan 18, Spanish dancer and choreographer Maria Pages' An Ode to Time from Jan 1 to 3 and Joyful Siberia by Russia's State Academic Dance Company of Siberia from Jan 6 to 8.


The Nutcracker will be staged at the National Center for the Performing Arts from Jan 17 to 19. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Among the Chinese shows that will also grace stages during the festival are The Nutcracker by the National Ballet of China, contemporary dance So Low by Hong Kong dance troupe Lai Tak-wai and the drama Blessed Family by artists from Beijing People's Art Theater.


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Elements of the 2020 Winter Olympics are a major draw for this year's festival, which will feature snow and ice activities and lantern shows in Beijing and Zhangjiakou.

The 2020 Meet in Beijing arts festival is sponsored by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, State Administration of Radio and Television, the Beijing municipal government, and the Beijing Organizing Committee for the 2022 Winter Olympics. It's organized by the China Arts and Entertainment Group and the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Culture and Tourism.


Joyful Siberia by Russia's State Academic Dance Company of Siberia was staged at the National Center for the Performing Arts from Jan 6 to 8. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Shamisen musician Hiromitsu Agatsuma's crossover concert will be held at Beijing Tianqiao Performing Arts Center on Jan 18. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Richard Clayderman's New Year concert will be held at the Great Hall of the People on Jan 18. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-01-09 15:14:16
<![CDATA[Journeys to the past]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/09/content_1472506.htm

Colorful pottery pieces of Cucuteni culture unearthed in Dobrovat, Romania, in 2019. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In the early 1920s, modern archaeological practices only began to emerge in China after Swedish geologist Johan Gunnar Andersson introduced Western methodologies and led key excavations across Central and West China.

Yangshao Culture, which dates back to between 5000 and 3000 BC and is best known for its colorful pottery vessels, is undoubtedly one of his most important discoveries, one that unveiled China's rich Neolithic heritage.

But because similar patterns were discovered emblazoned on the contemporary ceramics of Cucuteni culture in what today is Romania, Andersson made an arbitrary deduction: Chinese civilization was not original. Instead, he believed, it was introduced from the West via the Eurasian grasslands. This theory influenced academia for decades.

Although Andersson's speculation was later disproved by subsequent archaeological findings in China that reflected the spontaneous roots of Chinese pottery culture, Cucuteni remained a mesmerizing name for generations of Chinese archaeologists: Where did the similarities arise?

In July, four archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences set off on a two-month trip to explore Cucuteni Culture in Romania, on what was the first phase of excavations in the village of Dobrovat, near the city of Iasi in that country's northeast.

"Andersson's archaeological findings and mindset have their limitations," Wen Chenghao, an archaeologist working on the project, tells China Daily. "However, he left a lasting legacy for us. It was necessary for us to gain a comprehensive overview of our own for comparison."


A pair of gilded silver dragons found in a 2,000-year-old Xiongnu graveyard in Mongolia. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Test of hypothesis

A 6-hectare heritage site in Dobrovat, dating back to around 4300 BC in the early stages of Cucuteni culture, was the focus of their research. The remains of nine houses had been discovered and the earth, which was used to construct them, was found to be scorched.

Charred earth was also found at sites dating back to the Yangshao period in China, and were widely assumed to be a type of consolidated building material.

According to Wen, however, in Dobrovat, the condition of the 20-centimeter-thick blocks of earth-some of them vitrified at a temperature of over 1,000 C-instead suggested that these dwellings had been deliberately burned to the ground.

"It's likely that these intense fires were not accidentally caused by war or looting," he says. "This may reveal that certain religious rituals took place when people abandoned their homes. This inspired our future studies into similar phenomenon in China."

Since no Cucuteni culture graveyards have yet been discovered, Wen further speculated that Cucuteni burial customs may have dictated that people were burned together with their houses after they had died.

"After being inhabited for years, the houses were no longer treated as wood and earth," Wen says. "Instead, they were thought to be 'alive'-and something spiritual."

He says he has learned a lot from his Romanian colleagues.

"When we conducted careful and detailed analysis of these earth structures, just like examining and rebuilding the broken pottery discovered there, they helped us reconstruct the original appearance of these dwellings and reveal an abundance of easily overlooked historical information."

Chinese archaeologists will also help to solve problems at the site.

Since two-thirds of the Dobrovat site is covered by thick forest, most electronic detectors don't work there. Wen says they will take a "Luoyang spade"-a traditional tube-shaped testing tool widely used by Chinese archaeologists to examine the layers of soil to locate possible underground relics-to Dobrovat for the second phase of excavations later this year.

Although two months seemed too short a time to completely answer the questions raised by Andersson a century ago, Wen says the hypothesis of communication between the Cucuteni and Yangshao cultures, separated by 7,000 kilometers, seems improbable.

"It was our romantic imagination before we did field research in Dobrovat," he says. "However, despite the similar patterns on the colorful pottery, other unearthed objects from the two cultures appear markedly different.

"Nevertheless, their apparent 'similarities'-even the patterns of colorful potteries-seem to reflect that people in different regions shared paths in social development carried over from Neolithic times to the Bronze Age. Comparative cross-cultural studies require an insight into historical precedents rather than by simply examining scattered signals."


 

Zhao Qingpo (center), an archaeologist from the Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology, is engaged in excavation work at the Lake Bogoria site in Kenya, studying the origin of modern humans. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In Africa

Thanks to the Belt and Road Initiative, Chinese archaeologists now have more opportunity to conduct joint archaeological research around the world owning to recent intergovernmental agreements. According to statistics of the National Cultural Heritage Administration, Chinese archaeologists participated in 38 archaeological projects overseas in 2019, cooperating with around 20 countries.

In Kenya, Chinese archaeologists from the Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology and Shandong University conducted a joint research project into the origins of modern humans-a hot topic in global academia.

They began excavations in September at a site on Lake Bogoria dating back to the mid-Paleolithic period, which in Africa refers to an era between 250,000 and 40,000 years ago.

"Fundamental methodologies of Paleolithic archaeology are basically the same all over the world," Zhao Qingpo, an archaeologist from the Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology, says. "Consequently, it is really convenient for us to have exchanges with overseas scholars in this field."

Sparse vegetation and continuous rainfall have led to many relics being discovered lying on the open ground. However, it is still not easy to spot them in an area of around 16 square kilometers.

"We can only walk all around the area," Zhao says, recalling the tough but exciting days spent working in the field. "If we traveled in a vehicle, important findings could be easily overlooked."

Zhao and his colleagues identified 14 key excavation sites by Lake Bogoria, where 5,000 pieces of stone tools-choppers, scrapers, adzes and pickaxes, among others-were unearthed. On a 2-square-meter spot alone, over 700 relics were found within a 15-centimeter-deep layer of earth.

"There is no doubt that the site used to be a workshop," he says. "The adoption of the Levallois technique (a distinctive type of stone knapping) to create these highly standardized stone objects was apparent, where it functioned much like a modern assembly line. The ancient humans who used this process had a strong cognitive ability."

The site at Lake Bogoria was accidentally unearthed by a local villager who was a guide for the Leakey family, a group of renowned British archaeologists credited with many key findings on early-stage humans.

Standing in a local museum, surrounded by a myriad of relics dating back more than 2 million years, Zhao realizes how difficult it is to catch up with Western scholars, who have been studying the origins of humans for over a century.

Nevertheless, for Zhao, traveling to Kenya has not only been an academic pilgrimage. He says through the ongoing project, and following key findings in China in the recent years, Chinese scholars can also have their voices better heard in the study of modern humans-which is thought to have begun some 200,000 years ago.

According to current Sino-Kenyan agreement, the research on Lake Bogoria site will last for four years, but Zhao expects that to be extended.

"The Leakey family were stationed in Africa for decades," he says. "We need to adopt a similar attitude and focus on one place for a long time. Harvests only follow persistence."


Temple of Montu in Luxor witnesses the first Sino-Egyptian joint excavation on the history of ancient Egypt. [Photo provided to China Daily]

New terrain

After lengthy preparations in 2018, China's first archaeological excavation in Egypt formally kicked off in November. In Luxor, local archaeologists welcomed four Chinese scholars from the Institute of Archaeology, CASS, as part of a joint research project at a key site of the New Kingdom period (16th century-11th century BC).

Academics from the two countries are working together to unveil the splendor of the Temple of Montu, which was dedicated to the Egyptian falcon-god 3,300 years ago, using 3D modeling technology alongside the excavation of the architectural ruins.

French archaeologists worked there in the 1940s and 1950s, but their efforts were curtailed by war and social turmoil, and old findings litter the abandoned site covered by thick grass.

"The stones relics suffer from severe weathering, and many previously recorded inscriptions have disappeared-but luckily most areas remain untouched by archaeologists," says researcher Li Xinwei. "We hope our excavations will help to figure out how this temple was constructed and its status during the New Kingdom period."

He adds that preservation work is involved at every step of their studies. A new warehouse and a workshop for this program had been constructed ahead of the excavation.

For Chinese archaeology, fieldwork in neighboring countries can also help with research back home.

At the Gol Mod No 2 graveyard site in Mongolia, for instance, scholars from the Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology and Ulaanbaatar State University joined forces last year to unearth the tombs of Xiongnu nobles-the powerful nomadic ethnic group appearing in ancient Chinese historical records, speculated to be the predecessor of the Hun.

Many exquisite cultural relics were found in two tombs dating to the period of China's Western Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 24), including a pair of gilded silver dragons, jade belt hooks and jewels.

The American Journal of Archaeology listed the finding as one of the "top 10 discoveries" of 2019.


A Chinese archaeological team from Jilin University cooperates with Russian experts researching Pinchuka-6, a graveyard site deep in the Siberian forest. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Going further north, a team of Chinese archaeologists from the Changchun-based Jilin University worked with their Russian counterparts at Pinchuka-6, a large-scale grave site dating back to between the 4th and 6th centuries that was discovered deep in the Siberian forest.

The Chinese team leader Quan Qiankun says the burial rituals and unearthed bronzeware pieces at the site share similarities with ancient nomadic ethnic groups in northern China.

"It indicates that even people living in the north of Siberia had a connection with North China at that time," Quan says. "A lot of focus is placed on the study of ancient ethnic groups to the north of Chinese border, but a clear picture of what life was like in Siberia remains a mystery to most Chinese archaeologists. It is essential for us to have this program and explore the sphere of influence of East Asian cultures."

"Today's international steps by Chinese archaeologists would have been unimaginable even five years ago," says Bai Yunxiang, a senior researcher from the Institute of Archaeology, CASS. "Frankly speaking, Chinese archaeologists' understanding of foreign sites is still insufficient. More projects will help us join the dots and eventually build a systematic map of knowledge about the culture of other countries."

He also expects Chinese archaeologists to have a growing influence in global academia.

"Archaeologists' broader world view shows their open mind and cultural inclusiveness," says Song Xinchao, deputy director of the National Cultural Heritage Administration. "They'll also help people to better understand today's global issues from a historical perspective."

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2020-01-09 07:49:57
<![CDATA[Art of Jian ware in E China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/06/content_1472132.htm

Jian ware, a type of ceramic in East China, is usually dark-glazed. Its patterns are spontaneous and no two pieces are ever the same.

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2020-01-06 17:00:00
<![CDATA[A taste of Spring Festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/07/content_1472131.htm

Spring Festival is just around the corner! What dishes are eaten during the festival and what meaning do they have? Check out this series of videos for a taste of this annual Chinese festival No.1 Sixi Baked Bran: The flavor of Spring Festival is mom's cooking.

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2020-01-07 14:50:00
<![CDATA[Snow scenery of Summer Palace in Beijing]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/07/content_1472315.htm

Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 6, 2020 shows the snow scenery of the Summer Palace in Beijing, capital of China. Beijing on Sunday embraced the first snowfall this year. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-07 15:27:46
<![CDATA[Art center to stage dance shows for anniversary]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/07/content_1472313.htm

Performances by creative dancers in Beijing will cap off the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of the White Box Art Center inside the 798 art zone. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Dance is often seen as a good companion for contemporary art to deliver unique experiences to audiences.

Performances by creative dancers in Beijing will cap off the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of the White Box Art Center inside the 798 art zone.

At its venue Collide, the center will stage shows on Jan 10 and 11 directed and choreographed by Chi Dongdong, aiming to engage the audience with an immersive journey to investigate the relationship between space and body.

The dance performances will offer people a perspective to reflect on Chinese cultural traditions through body movements, feeling the collision and re-infusion of the past and present.


Performances by creative dancers in Beijing will cap off the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of the White Box Art Center inside the 798 art zone. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Performances by creative dancers in Beijing will cap off the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of the White Box Art Center inside the 798 art zone. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Performances by creative dancers in Beijing will cap off the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of the White Box Art Center inside the 798 art zone. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Performances by creative dancers in Beijing will cap off the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of the White Box Art Center inside the 798 art zone. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-07 14:37:27
<![CDATA[Father of fuwa mascots opens art gallery]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/07/content_1472311.htm

A teapot based on the collaboration between Han Meilin and Chen Guoliang, a zisha artisan of Jiangsu province. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Han Meilin, the artist and designer who created the fuwa mascots of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, is known for being highly productive and energetic, even at age 83.

Recently Han opened a new art gallery named after himself, in addition to the three venues in Beijing, Hangzhou of Zhejiang province, and Yinchuan of Ningxia Hui autonomous region.

The new space opened in late December is located in Yixing, a county-level city in Jiangsu province famous for a long-standing industry of producing clay ware teapots that have been well-received among tea drinkers and teapot collectors at home and abroad.


Teapots based on the collaboration between Han Meilin and Qu Huadi, a zishaartisan of Jiangsu province. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The space displays dozens of teapots Han designed using Yixing's quality clay that feature calligraphy, paintings and elements of primitive art. There are also objects on show based on the collaboration between Han and noted zisha clay artisans of Jiangsu.

Han donated some 500 of his artworks to the city government of Yixing at the gallery's opening, and was named an honorary resident of Yixing.

The Han Meilin Art Series, which catalogs the artist's wide-ranging productions and is published by the People's Fine Arts Publishing House, was also officially launched.


A teapot based on the collaboration between Han Meilin and Wang Yinxian, a zisha artisan of Jiangsu province. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Han Meilin at his studio in Yixing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

]]>
2020-01-07 14:30:16
<![CDATA[Modern technology a class act for distant schools]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/08/content_1472252.htm

Online classes offer new learning experiences for students in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Computers and the internet are opening up a world of online opportunities for students in Urumqi, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

Students from the 104 Regiment Primary School of the 12th Division of Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps in Urumqi come every week to a high-tech classroom. Two screens are placed on the wall, as well as four cameras and six microphones on the ceiling. This modern environment, and net access, allows them to have an online class with teachers from Qingdao Zaoshan Primary School in Shandong province. With real-time connectivity they can hear and communicate with each other.

Since the project was launched in March, 11 schools in the division have joined, according to Feng Tianxiao, deputy director of the education bureau for the 12th Division of Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps.

"To balance education access for eastern and western China, teachers were sent to western provinces every year, which cost a lot in both financial and human resources. However, sometimes teachers who come west do not really meet the needs, thus, making it a waste of resources. To solve this problem, we introduced the online system," Feng adds.

Before a semester begins, teachers on each side will have online meetings to decide which classes can be shared with schools in Xinjiang and then set the schedule.

"The shared classes should begin at around 10 am, a time suitable for both sides," explains Hu Wenjiang, the headmaster of 104 Regiment Primary School.

During the class, teachers in Shandong can ask questions to students in Xinjiang and one or two local teachers will be present to help it run smoothly.

"To achieve continuous educational improvement, it is necessary to enhance local teachers' abilities," says Hu.


Online classes offer new learning experiences for students in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Sang Na, a Chinese teacher in the Urumqi school, says once a teacher in Qingdao Zaoshan Primary School used a Chinese shadow puppet in class. This inspired her a great deal as she realized the importance of creativity.

"Introducing traditional puppets in class not only makes the class more interesting, but also creates a chance to bring students closer to traditional culture," she says.

Sun Jiani, a fifth-grade student from the Urumqi school who takes part in the online class, relishes the experience. She especially likes the three-minute speeches delivered by her peers in Qingdao, saying that sharing has broadened her horizons and helped her to understand life in eastern China.

The project has now expanded from Urumqi to Hami.

According to Jiang Zongjun, director of the education bureau of the 13th Division in Hami, 12 schools in the division are scattered over an area of nearly 10,000 square kilometers.

In some rural places, a lack of teachers is always a problem. While this is being addressed, the internet is helpful, Jiang says.

"In the past, some of our teachers had to teach several subjects, but with the help of interactive online classes, they can focus on their own subject," says Jiang.

Yet, challenges remain. Li Zhiying, a teacher in Hongshan Farm School, says it took her some time to get used to the interactive system.

Usually, there are about 40 students in one class. But adding those online, teachers have to face nearly 500 students at the same time.

She recalls that at first, she rarely asked questions to students on the screen in front of her. Later, with guidance from other teachers, she had more interactions with students in other classrooms and could handle all the students at the same time.

]]>
2020-01-08 07:58:27
<![CDATA[Blogger-author opens new chapter on marine biology]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/08/content_1472249.htm

Zhang Chenliang's books are interpretations of a Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) illustrated book about marine creatures. [Photo provided to China Daily]

You could say it comes naturally to Zhang Chenliang. Indeed, his moniker is "the man of natural history", or Bowu Jun in Chinese. This is no idle boast as the popular science blogger has 11 million followers on Sina Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter.

His latest work-a two-minute video about the "myth" of crabs-was on the "hot search" list of the micro-blogging site on Dec 17.

According to legend, male crustaceans are romantic and reliable "husbands". When danger comes, it is said, the male box crab will carry its "wife" with its claws and flee to a safe place where the female will shed its shell.

Yet, Zhang's video unveils the truth about these marine creatures. Calappa crabs, as they are called, live alone most of their life and only get together for mating, which is the same for all kinds of crabs. Also, the male Calappa stays with the female Calappa while she's shedding its shell-which marks sexual maturity-not to protect her but to make sure he's close by at this time.

Netizens were quick to comment that they were disappointed that crabs did not have such a romantic life.

The video is just an example of how Zhang shares his knowledge with netizens.

The 31-year-old Beijing native, with a master's degree in agricultural entomology and pest control from the China Agricultural University, is a project director at Chinese magazine Natural History. He's in charge of the operation of the magazine's account on Sina Weibo.

Most of his daily schedule involves answering questions raised by readers online. These can encompass entomology, zoology, botany and geography.

Zhang likes to use humor to get his message across.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

Journey of discovery

Over the past five years, besides answering thousands of questions on Sina Weibo, Zhang has been devoted to researching marine animals in China and writing a series of books titled Hai Cuo Tu Biji (Notes on Illustrated Handbook of Marine Animals). The third book of the series was published recently by China Citic Press Group and Chinese National Geography Books.

Zhang says the series is inspired by an old illustrated book, titled Hai Cuo Tu, by Nie Huang.

Nie lived in the early years of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). As a passionate traveler, his journeys took him from North China's Hebei province to the eastern coastal areas.

Nie painted more than 300 marine creatures he had seen or heard about during his trips over the decades and finally finished the book in 1698. The book was then introduced to the imperial court in 1726 and was admired by the emperors.

Nie's book includes four volumes-the first three are now in the Palace Museum in Beijing and the fourth one in the Taipei Palace Museum.

Zhang got his first glimpse of the fascinating book during a visit to the Beijing museum when he was in middle school.

Hai Cuo Tu, featuring the first three volumes of Nie's book, was published by the Palace Museum in 2014, and Zhang read it avidly.

A year later, Zhang decided to write a book to verify some of the creatures in Nie's book. "Nie not only wrote down what he knew or heard, but also left some questions which he hoped descendants could answer for him."

Zhang tried to answer most of the questions with his knowledge and research. He traveled to China's coastal areas and also to Japan and Thailand, visiting local markets and scholars, and read old books or theses to find the answers.

"I think Nie would be happy to read my books," he says.

Zhang published his first book in 2016, verifying 38 creatures featured in Nie's Hai Cuo Tu, and a year later, a second book was published, verifying 40 more. Both books won praise from readers, selling 260,000 and 160,000 copies respectively.

In 2017, the Taipei Palace Museum made the images of the fourth volume of Nie's Hai Cuo Tu open to the public for free, and Zhang got to verify some species from it for his third book. "I'm trying to let the marine creatures across the Taiwan Straits unite."

The third book, including 20 articles and featuring 63 marine animals, took Zhang two years to finish.

"It took longer because for the first two books, I selected the easier creatures to verify, which I already had some knowledge of and are more common," Zhang explains. "For the third book, I had to look into the creatures that were not easy to verify. Some of the creatures are only based on other people's descriptions, and may look quite different in reality."


Zhang Chenliang. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Science education

Zhang's experience in researching insects helps him when verifying marine creatures. "Even though they are not related, the scientific ways of researching are the same."

Besides the elaborate paintings from Nie, Zhang also invites several illustrators to draw pictures for him to pair with his articles so that the readers can understand the content more easily.

Zhang says he writes each article in logical order following questions that a reader would ask.

"If I write about a pearl, besides saying that people in the Qing Dynasty started to breed pearls, I will also answer questions like 'what's the difference between a pearl in fresh water and in seawater'," he says.

"I don't want my readers to have more questions after reading my articles."

In his books, Zhang explains how some of the creatures were quite common in Nie's time but have become rare or endangered nowadays-because of overfishing or environmental destruction.

It's his way of popularizing public science education and educating the readers to protect the environment.

He is planning a fourth book.

He's also running an account on video-sharing app Douyin, known outside China as TikTok, to interact with fans.

The growing use of social media, he says, offers more opportunities to spread knowledge of nature and science.

Yet, it's important to understand how different platforms work, he adds, and present tailor-made content for each in either words or videos.

Zhang Jie, a researcher at the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, comments that Zhang Chenliang has brought the seas to life by describing major categories of marine creatures, and their characteristics, behavior and breeding.

"After reading the book, you must feel closer to the oceans," she says.

]]>
2020-01-08 07:44:55
<![CDATA[Administration calls for more public access to historic buildings]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/08/content_1472268.htm

File photo of Potala Palace in Lhasa, the Tibet autonomous region. [Photo/China News Service]

China's National Cultural Heritage Administration has called for scenic spots and organizations to open their historic buildings to the public as much as possible.

In a new guideline, the administration encourages scenic spots to display relics using new techniques and take measures to encourage public participation and interactions.

In order to improve tourist experiences, they can divide tourist times into day tours and night tours according to their own circumstances, the guideline says.

]]>
2020-01-08 09:40:14
<![CDATA[Pianist Richard Clayderman to perform again in Beijing]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/06/content_1472075.htm

French pianist Richard Clayderman will return to Beijing with a recital at the Great Hall of the People featuring some of his best-known pieces, including Ballad for Adeline, A Comme Amourand Lyphard Melody. Since making his debut in China in 1992, Clayderman has held nearly 500 concerts in China in nearly 100 cities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


French pianist Richard Clayderman will return to Beijing with a recital at the Great Hall of the People featuring some of his best-known pieces, including Ballad for Adeline, A Comme Amourand Lyphard Melody. Since making his debut in China in 1992, Clayderman has held nearly 500 concerts in China in nearly 100 cities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


French pianist Richard Clayderman will return to Beijing with a recital at the Great Hall of the People featuring some of his best-known pieces, including Ballad for Adeline, A Comme Amourand Lyphard Melody. Since making his debut in China in 1992, Clayderman has held nearly 500 concerts in China in nearly 100 cities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


French pianist Richard Clayderman will return to Beijing with a recital at the Great Hall of the People featuring some of his best-known pieces, including Ballad for Adeline, A Comme Amourand Lyphard Melody. Since making his debut in China in 1992, Clayderman has held nearly 500 concerts in China in nearly 100 cities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

]]>
2020-01-06 13:10:57
<![CDATA[24 Solar Terms: 5 things you may not know about Minor Cold]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/06/content_1472073.htm

A shot of trees covered by snow. [Photo/china.com.cn]

Minor Cold is the 23rd solar term of the 24 traditional Chinese solar terms. For most areas of China, it marks the start of the coldest days of the year. This year's Minor Cold starts on Jan 6. Many Chinese sayings use the weather and climate situation during Minor Cold to predict the weather in the following spring.

Still, bitter cold can't prevent people from enjoying their lives. Here are some things that help us stay warm during Minor Cold.


[Photo/Asianewsphoto]

Stocking up for New Year

During Minor Cold, people always start stocking New Year goods, which include Spring Festival couplets, New Year pictures, paper-cuts for window decoration, fire crackers, incense and lanterns.


[File photo]

Mutton hot pot, chestnuts and baked sweet potato

Mutton hot pot, chestnuts and baked sweet potato are three recommended foods for Minor Cold. According to traditional Chinese medicine theories, people need to eat food that contains more yang energy to prevent cold from harming their organs. The yang energy in the three types of food is strengthened through their method of cooking: boiling, stir frying and baking.

Beef, sesame, walnuts, almonds and raisins are also good choices for Minor Cold.


[File photo]

Eating Laba porridge

Another important traditional food for Minor Cold is Laba porridge. It is made from more than 20 kinds of nuts, cereals and dried fruits. Local people in Beijing often cook Laba porridge on the night of the seventh day of the twelfth lunar month. After one night's slow simmering, all the ingredients melt into the porridge in the morning of the eighth day, becoming a warm delicacy to enjoy on cold days.


Vegetable rice. [File photo]

Tasting Nanjing vegetable rice

People in Nanjing used to take Minor Cold quite seriously, and they still keep a custom of eating vegetable rice to celebrate this solar term. The rice is steamed with aijiaohuang (a kind of green vegetable), sausage and salted duck that are all the specialties in Nanjing.

Making Chinese traditional herbal medicine

Minor Cold is also the busiest time for doctors and pharmacies of traditional Chinese medicine. Many people need them to prepare new medicines, which will be consumed before the Lunar New Year.

]]>
2020-01-06 09:24:38
<![CDATA[Year-ender: 10 highest-grossing films of 2019]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/13/content_1472071.htm

Posters of six films on the list. [Photo/Mtime]

Editor's Note: Despite the "cold winter" theory stemming from the lackluster start of 2019, China's film industry has come through with a chain of homegrown blockbusters and impressive revenues. On Dec 6, the Chinese annual box office crossed the mark of 60 billion yuan ($8.53 billion) ?24 days earlier than the previous year according to China Movie Data Information Network.

At present, 78 pictures exceeded 100 million yuan ($14.22 million), and among these 15 grossed over 1 billion yuan ($142.2 million) and 6 over 2 billion ($284.5 million). In the last fortnight of 2019, highly-anticipated films like Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker and Ip Man 4 will be screened in the Chinese mainland. So the annual box office total is waiting to be unveiled.

Eight of the top moneymakers are domestic productions, such as the phenomenal Ne Zha, the sci-fi saga The Wandering Earth and romantic crime coming of age film Better Days. To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China, two high-profile pictures My People, My Country and The Captain seized a considerable market share. Moviegoers in Shanghai, Beijing and Shenzhen contributed most to the national box office.

Here are the 10 highest-grossing films in 2019 thus far. Which is your favorite? What are your expectations for Chinese cinema in 2020?


A still image of  Ne Zha. [Photo/Mtime]

1. Ne Zha

Box office returns: 4.97 billion yuan ($710 million)

Loosely based on the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) novel Fengshen Yanyi (The Investiture of the Gods), the film is about mythological figure Ne Zha who fights against fate.


A still image of  The Wandering Earth. [Photo/Mtime]

2. The Wandering Earth

Box office returns: 4.65 billion yuan ($650 million)

As the sun is dying, people all around the world build giant thrusters to move Earth out of its orbit and sail to a new star system. Yet the 2,500-year journey comes with unexpected dangers, and in order to save humanity, a group of young people must fight hard for the survival of humankind.


A poster of  Avengers: Endgame. [Photo/Mtime]

3. Avengers: Endgame

Box office returns: 4.24 billion yuan ($600 million)

After the devastating events of Avengers: Infinity War (2018), the universe is in ruins. With the help of their remaining allies, the Avengers assemble once more to reverse Thanos' actions and restore balance to the universe.


A poster of  My People, My Country. [Photo/Mtime]

4. My People, My Country

Box office returns: 2.99 billion yuan ($420 million)

A seven-part anthology film, it depicts seven significant historical moments since the founding of the People's Republic of China. The film is directed by seven prestigious directors: Chen Kaige, Zhang Yibai, Guan Hu, Xue Xiaolu, Xu Zheng, Ning Hao and Wen Muye, and stars many of China's top actors.


A poster of  The Captain. [Photo/Mtime]

5. The Captain

Box office returns: 2.87 billion yuan ($410 million)

Starring actor Zhang Hanyu, the film is based on the story of heroic Sichuan Airlines pilot Liu Chuanjian, whose emergency landing last year marked one of the biggest miracles in China's civil aviation history.


A poster of  Crazy Alien. [Photo/Mtime]

6. Crazy Alien

Box office returns: 2.2 billion yuan ($310 million)

A monkey trainer's act goes wrong after an alien crash-lands on Earth and injures his monkey. Desperate to perform, he attempts to train the alien instead, but is punished after the alien regains his powers.


A poster of  Pegasus. [Photo/Mtime]

7. Pegasus

Box office returns: 1.71 billion yuan ($240 million)

Directed and written by Han Han, the sports comedy portrays an old-time racing champion trying to return to the race track.


A poster of  The Bravest. [Photo/Mtime]

8. The Bravest

Box office returns: 1.69 billion yuan ($240 million)

Adapted from ethnic Mongolian writer Baoerji Yuanye's non-fiction work Tears Are the Deepest Water, the moving story depicts a group of heroic firefighters.


A still image of  Better Days. [Photo/Mtime]

9. Better Days

Box office returns: 1.54 billion yuan ($220 million)

A bullied teenage girl forms an unlikely friendship with a rebellious young man who protects her from her assailants, all while she copes with the pressures of university entrance examinations.


A poster of  Fast and Furious: Hobbs and Shaw. [Photo/Mtime]

10. Fast and Furious: Hobbs and Shaw

Box office returns: 1.43 billion yuan ($200 million)

Lawman Luke Hobbs (Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson) and outcast Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham) form an unlikely alliance when a genetically enhanced cybernetic villain threatens the future of humanity.

]]>
2019-12-13 07:00:00
<![CDATA[24 Solar Terms: 5 things you may not know about Minor Cold]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/06/content_1471842.htm

A shot of trees covered by snow. [Photo/china.com.cn]

Minor Cold is the 23rd solar term of the 24 traditional Chinese solar terms. For most areas of China, it marks the start of the coldest days of the year. This year's Minor Cold starts on Jan 6. Many Chinese sayings use the weather and climate situation during Minor Cold to predict the weather in the following spring.

Still, bitter cold can't prevent people from enjoying their lives. Here are some things that help us stay warm during Minor Cold.


[Photo/Asianewsphoto]

Stocking up for New Year

During Minor Cold, people always start stocking New Year goods, which include Spring Festival couplets, New Year pictures, paper-cuts for window decoration, fire crackers, incense and lanterns.


[File photo]

Mutton hot pot, chestnuts and baked sweet potato

Mutton hot pot, chestnuts and baked sweet potato are three recommended foods for Minor Cold. According to traditional Chinese medicine theories, people need to eat food that contains more yang energy to prevent cold from harming their organs. The yang energy in the three types of food is strengthened through their method of cooking: boiling, stir frying and baking.

Beef, sesame, walnuts, almonds and raisins are also good choices for Minor Cold.


[File photo]

Eating Laba porridge

Another important traditional food for Minor Cold is Laba porridge. It is made from more than 20 kinds of nuts, cereals and dried fruits. Local people in Beijing often cook Laba porridge on the night of the seventh day of the twelfth lunar month. After one night's slow simmering, all the ingredients melt into the porridge in the morning of the eighth day, becoming a warm delicacy to enjoy on cold days.


Vegetable rice. [File photo]

Tasting Nanjing vegetable rice

People in Nanjing used to take Minor Cold quite seriously, and they still keep a custom of eating vegetable rice to celebrate this solar term. The rice is steamed with aijiaohuang (a kind of green vegetable), sausage and salted duck that are all the specialties in Nanjing.

Making Chinese traditional herbal medicine

Minor Cold is also the busiest time for doctors and pharmacies of traditional Chinese medicine. Many people need them to prepare new medicines, which will be consumed before the Lunar New Year.

]]>
2020-01-06 09:24:38
<![CDATA[Shore to find great flavors]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/03/content_1471346.htm

Braised sea cucumber with leek. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A Beijing restaurant specializing in Lu cuisine, a complex culinary style from Shandong province, is offering up an array of regional delights centered around seafood, Li Yingxue reports.

Long renowned for being salty and heavily-sauced, Lu cuisine from Shandong province is one of the eight main cooking styles found in China. But one restaurant in Beijing, the aptly-named Lu Style, is now giving the time-honored culinary genre a fresh twist with a dash of modern fine-dining.

Born and raised in Qufu, Shandong province, executive chef Zhang Xiangdong believes that the origins of Lu cuisine derive from the complex dishes developed by private chefs hired to work in the mansions of Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) officials combined with the seafood dishes found on the Jiaodong Peninsula.

"The food is not always dark in color. Lu cuisine actually highlights the flavors of the ingredients and requires a lot of sophisticated cooking skills," Zhang says.

All the dishes at Lu Style typically capture the essence of the culinary style of Northeast China-and Yimeng pancake with six sauces is just one example.

The six types of sauces are specialties from six regions of Shandong province-fried shrimp from Rizhao; a sauce made from the tender leaves of Chinese toon from Linyi; Spanish mackerel sauce from Weihai; chili sauce from Heze; minced salt and sesame sauce from Zaozhuang; and sliced pickles from Jining.


Yimeng pancake with six sauces. [Photo provided to China Daily]

According to Zhang, the pancake is made using a mix of five different grains, before being cut into squares and plated up.

"I hope from this one dish, diners are able to sample the flavors of the different regions of Shandong," Zhang says.

Since seafood is the highlight of Lu cuisine, Lu Style offers a variety of different types to choose from-eight from Weihai alongside eight from the Jiaodong Peninsula.

The former includes sea cucumber, abalone and oyster, while the latter covers mostly shell fish such as whelks, snails and clams.

"Seafood is common on dinner tables in the Jiaodong region. We often braise the larger, more expensive seafood to highlight its original flavor, while for smaller fare, frying them in a spicy sauce is a more common way of cooking them-and one that pairs well with beer," Zhang explains.


Braised prawn with cabbage. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Salt-coated peled is inspired by a traditional fish dish found in Lu cuisine and a regional method of making bread. A type of white freshwater fish, the peled are shipped in from Sailimu Lake in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, and have a tender and delicate texture and flavor like tofu.

The fish is simply coated with salt before it's baked. When it's served, the salty coating cracks open to reveal the fresh, juicy meat of the fish.

Sea cucumber is a dish that is nourishing, but one that's also difficult to cook. At Lu Style, sea cucumber soup and braised sea cucumber with leeks are both signature dishes.

All the sea cucumbers served at Lu Style are sourced from the wild and are over three years old. According to Zhang, they harvested at a depth of 20 meters and are plump with strong spines.

Only salt is added to the sea cucumber soup as seasoning, so the umami of the soup comes purely from the sea cucumber. The deep green color of the soup comes from the seaweed that sea cucumber eats, its only source of sustenance.

Donkey meat is not a common ingredient in Chinese cooking, but something of a regional delicacy in Shandong. Lu Style sources the meat from animals culled at the age of around 2 years old.

"The donkey's skin, meat and milk are all nutritious, and donkey meat is one of the main ingredients found in Lu cuisine," Zhang says.

Donkey gelatin soup with fermented black garlic is a typical winter treat. The first step in creating the sweet and salty soup is to boil the donkey meat and gelatin for 12 hours at a low heat, before the black garlic is added and then cooked for a further four hours.


Marinated garlic with scallop. [Photo provided to China Daily]

All the flavors of the meat, gelatin and black garlic infuse in the glutinous soup base to create a distinctively warming dish-and one for which Lu Style has applied for a national patent.

Donkey hoofs are another specialty of the restaurant that have rich nutritional value, as does their signature yogurt dish, which is made from donkey milk.

Zhang and his team take a lot of effort to source the best ingredients. From the mushrooms from Jilin province and the potatoes from the Inner Mongolia autonomous region to the clams from South Korea and scallops from Japan, each ingredient is carefully selected.

There are four ingredients that are considered the freshest in rural China-the tender leaves of the deciduous Chinese toon tree, the first batch of Chinese chives, cucumbers with the flower left on and lotus roots picked after their flowers drop off.

To find the best first batch of Chinese chives, chefs from Lu Style visited seven provinces before finally sourcing the freshest ones grown in Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang province.

"The Chinese chives there grow in black soil with an 80 percent humidity, and they are planted around 15 centimeters apart to maximize their exposure to the sun," says Zhang.


Braised sea cucumber with leek. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Just as culinary staples are a highlight of Lu cuisine, they also feature prominently at Lu Style. Pot-braised noodle soup is another must-try.

"It looks like a simple dish but the timing of when to add the water is crucial and tests the skill of the chef," he says. "The leeks must be fried in hot oil until they just start to burn, and then water and the noodles are added to the pot. If it's done too early, the aroma of the leeks will not shine through, and if it's too late the leeks will simply burn."

All the noodles are handmade by the restaurant's pastry chef. According to Zhang, the pastry chef cuts each noodle to exactly the same width. "Sometimes, I have to ask the chef not to cut them so precisely as it makes the noodles look like they were made using a machine," he says.

There are two other dishes that are well worth trying: dumplings with a sea urchin filling, and steamed buns with dried green beans, fresh scallop and diced black pork.

The restaurant was awarded with a Michelin Plate in November, one of just three Lu cuisine restaurants listed in the Michelin Guide Beijing 2020.

The logo of Lu Style hanging above the entrance is also eye-catching. Created by Hong Kong designer Hon Bing-wah, the logo is based on the Chinese character lu-an abbreviation of "Shandong province"-which looks like a sail on the sea, passing the sun.

A twisting pine tree greets the guests, representing the warmth and hospitality of the people of Shandong.

From the names on the private dining rooms to the interior decor, the design of the restaurant has been clearly inspired by the ancient Chinese classic, The Book of Songs.

The book unites the two floors of the interior space-the ceiling is made from poems in the book, while each of the steps is made of book spines.

Zeng Hui, deputy director of Beijing Design Week's organizing committee, was the design consultant for Lu Style. He published a book, The Life Aesthetics of Lu Style, in December 2018.

"Lu Style, a museum of life aesthetics in catering, is shortening the distance between food and art," Zeng wrote in the book. "Even though each cuisine has its own beauty, the beauty of Lu Style is that it combines all the flavors found in Chinese cuisine."

Contact the writer at liyingxue@chinadaily.com.cn

]]>
2020-01-03 07:41:57
<![CDATA[Diplomats celebrate New Year at Mutianyu Great Wall]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471344.htm

Diplomats and their family members from countries involved in the Belt and Road Initiative participate in the New Year celebration at the Mutianyu Great Wall in Beijing on Jan 1, 2020. [Photo by Xing Guangming/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

An event celebrating the New Year was held at the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall in Beijing on Wednesday morning with traditional Chinese cultural activities staged, such as drumming, dragon and lion dances, as well as a Hanfu crown ceremony.

At 7:33 am in the morning, diplomats from countries involved in the Belt and Road Initiative and their family members climbed the Great Wall, embracing the first sunshine of the New Year with cheers and blessings, along with tourists.


Family members of the diplomat from Pakistanin at the Mutianyu Great Wall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"The attending of a New Year ceremony at the Great Wall is a fabulous experience. It takes you back to the great historical journey of the Chinese nation. The New Year sun brings new hope for peace and prosperity," said Bukhari Asghar Abbas, a military officer from the Pakistani embassy in China.

"It is a significant event for the friendship of China and Pakistan. It suggests that the two old friends begin a new chapter of friendship with the arrival of the New Year," Abbas added.


The diplomat from Belarus and his family members at the Mutianyu Great Wall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Podkovyrow Aleksandr, the first secretary of the Belarusian embassy in China, climbed the Mutianyu Great Wall with his family. "I saw the beautiful sunrise at Mutianyu and felt the magnificence of China's natural environment and the greatness of the Great Wall," he said excitedly.

"It has been a wonderful experience coming to the grand celebration of 2020," said Dele Samuel Obadare, a financial officer of the Nigerian embassy in China.

The Mutianyu Great Wall, an iconic symbol of China and traditional Chinese culture, possesses unique international standing and cultural value in advancing the Belt and Road Initiative and building a community with a shared future for mankind.

The event will help promote the brand reputation and international influence of the Mutianyu Great Wall, according to a head from the scenic spot.


Cultural activities are held for the New Year celebration at the Mutianyu Great Wall in Beijing on Jan 1, 2020. [Photo by Xing Guangming/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Cultural activities are held for the New Year celebration at the Mutianyu Great Wall in Beijing on Jan 1, 2020. [Photo by Xing Guangming/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Tourists gather at the Mutianyu Great Wall in Beijing on Jan 1, 2020. [Photo by Xing Guangming/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Family members of the diplomat from Nigeria pose for a photo at the Mutianyu Great Wall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Tourists gather at the Mutianyu Great Wall in Beijing on Jan 1, 2020. [Photo by Xing Guangming/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-02 15:08:27
<![CDATA[Tsinghua art museum announces a diverse program in 2020]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471342.htm

Utensils and Ornaments Endlessly Fine, an exhibition of national treasures from Afghanistan was held at Tsinghua University Art Museum. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Curated exhibitions of Chinese and international art will highlight the program of Tsinghua University Art Museum Art Museum in 2020.

Exhibitions on Chinese art will include one dedicated to classic Chinese figure paintings and another one in memory of Bai Xueshi, the late painter of Chinese ink landscapes and a retired professor of Tsinghua University's Academy of Art and Design.

TAM will also mount exhibitions of its collections of thangka paintings and art of Zhang Daqian, one of the greatest artists of 20th century China.


Everlasting Beauty of Dunhuang, an exhibition which pays tribute to Chang Shuhong and Chang Shana, the father and daughter who are dedicated to the preservation of Dunhuang art. [Photo provided to China Daily]

International art to be on show include works of arte povera (poor art), a movement originating in Italy in the 1960s in which artists make use of worthless and daily objects to create. Works once shown at six important arte povera shows will come to Beijing and some 20 Italian artists will attend the opening at TAM.

Meanwhile, there will be an exhibition of the works by five Japanese artists of ukiyo-e, a photography exhibition in tribute to Henri-Cartier Bresson's two journeys in China, in 1948 and 1958, and an exhibition to review the modernism development of world design from 1880 and 1980.


Everlasting like the Heavens, an exhibition of artifacts from the Zhou, Qin, Han and Tang dynasties, was held at Tsinghua University Art Museum. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Another special show will look at the evolution of Indonesian art through the 20th century and till now. Indonesian art has gained wider recognition on the world art stage in recent years. Works of Indonesian artists are well received at fairs and auctions. Ruangrupa, an Indonesian art collective, will direct the 15 sessions of documenta in 2022, one of the world's important exhibitions for contemporary art which happens every five years in Kassel, Germany.

TAM presented 16 exhibitions in 2019 and several shows that draw an influx of visitors, such as Everlasting like the Heavens, which displayed artifacts from the Zhou, Qin, Han and Tang dynasties, and Everlasting Beauty of Dunhuang, which juxtaposed copies of Dunhuang mural paintings by Chang Shuhong and Chang Shana, the father and daughter who are dedicated to the preservation of Dunhuang art.


Utensils and Ornaments Endlessly Fine, an exhibition of national treasures from Afghanistan was held at Tsinghua University Art Museum. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Everlasting like the Heavens, an exhibition of artifacts from the Zhou, Qin, Han and Tang dynasties, was held at Tsinghua University Art Museum. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Everlasting Beauty of Dunhuang, an exhibition which pays tribute to Chang Shuhong and Chang Shana, the father and daughter who are dedicated to the preservation of Dunhuang art. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-02 15:00:07
<![CDATA[Huaxia Ancient Music Orchestra of Henan Museum perform romance-themed concert in Zhengzhou]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471340.htm

Members of the Huaxia Ancient Music Orchestra of Henan Museum perform at a romance-themed concert in Zhengzhou, Central China's Henan province, Jan 1, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Members of the Huaxia Ancient Music Orchestra of Henan Museum perform at a romance-themed concert in Zhengzhou, Central China's Henan province, Jan 1, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


A member of the Huaxia Ancient Music Orchestra of Henan Museum performs at a romance-themed concert in Zhengzhou, Central China's Henan province, Jan 1, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Members of the Huaxia Ancient Music Orchestra of Henan Museum perform at a romance-themed concert in Zhengzhou, Central China's Henan province, Jan 1, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Members of the Huaxia Ancient Music Orchestra of Henan Museum perform at a romance-themed concert in Zhengzhou, Central China's Henan province, Jan 1, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-02 15:02:18
<![CDATA[One-man art show an individual exploration with Eastern abstraction]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471338.htm

Attainment through Formlessness, an exhibition at Xiamen Powerlong Art Center through Feb 9, shows dozens of artist Wu Qian's recent paintings. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In his creation of mixed-media paintings, Wu Qian seeks to convey his understanding of Chinese aesthetic values through forms and lines similar to the strokes of Chinese calligraphy.

The artist, who works in both New York and his native city of Xiamen, Fujian province, relies on a variation of the color of ink to depict a world of black and white, yin and yang.

Attainment through Formlessness, an exhibition at Xiamen Powerlong Art Center through Feb 9, shows dozens of Wu's recent paintings, presenting the wilderness of abstract expressionism he has been exposed to in the United States and underlying which he imbues with Eastern introversion.  


Attainment through Formlessness, an exhibition at Xiamen Powerlong Art Center through Feb 9, shows dozens of artist Wu Qian's recent paintings. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Attainment through Formlessness, an exhibition at Xiamen Powerlong Art Center through Feb 9, shows dozens of artist Wu Qian's recent paintings. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Attainment through Formlessness, an exhibition at Xiamen Powerlong Art Center through Feb 9, shows dozens of artist Wu Qian's recent paintings. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-02 14:50:44
<![CDATA[Iconic art marks 70 years of New China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471336.htm

Young Woman by Zhang Wenxin. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Paintings and sculptures by a selection of 70 artists are on show at an exhibition at the National Museum of China, in tribute to the 70th anniversary of the People's Republic of China this year.

The exhibition through Feb 9 teams up well-established Chinese artists whose body of works reflect New China's progress over the past seven decades and the evolution of Chinese art, while also help shape people's aesthetic habit.

Among them are artists in their 80s and 90s who have contributed to transplanting the style of oil paintings into a Chinese cultural context or modernizing the face of classic Chinese ink art. There's also a younger generation of artists whose works show a diversified landscape of art.


Bride by Quan Shanshi. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Birthplace by Liu Jude. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Baiheliang by Zhong Han. [Photo provided to China daily]


At Noon by Tian Liming. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Xu Jiang deputy chairman of China Artists Association at the exhibition. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Vigor by Hu Wei. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Jiang Feng by Qian Shaowu. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Kunlun Range by Zhou Shaohua. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Landscape by Jing Shijian. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Old Man by Yang Feiyun. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Source of Power by Zhao Zongzao. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Glow by Zhan Jianjun. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fan Di'an, chairman of China Artists Association, at the exhibition. [Photo by Jiang Dong-China Daily]


Dream Follower by Jin Shangyi. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Circle of Life by Feng Yuan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-02 14:44:15
<![CDATA[Tsinghua exhibition shows portrait works]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471334.htm

Walls, by Akmal Ikramjonov from Uzbekistan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The creation of portrait paintings and sculptures are no longer at center stage in today's world of art, as artists adopt more diverse styles and use a wider range of mediums to produce works.

Although, the form has continued to play an important part in the work of artists from member countries of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, allowing them to depict the thoughts of their people and to reflect social realities.

Tour Portrait, an exhibition at the Tsinghua University Art Museum through March 29, pays tribute to that efforts created by more than 70 artists from seven SCO members states, namely Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and China.

More than 100 paintings and sculptures are on show, offering an extensive social and cultural vision of the nations featured. The audience will get a glimpse of the daily scenes and historic moments that shape the facial expressions and mental being of people in these countries.


The Servant of the Karavan Saray, a painting by Alakunov Ayip from Kyrghyzstan. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Dancer by Chinese artist Liu Jude. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Portrait of Z. Habibulloev, by Boimurodov Behzod from Tajikistan. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Portrait of a Father, by Russian artist Bernadskiy Gennady Valentinovich. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Mountain Girl, a painting by Rahat Naveed Masud from Pakistan. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Distant Mountains-Fellow Countryman from Laha Tun by Chinese artist Feng Yuan. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Confucius, a painting by Askhat Akhmedyarov from Kazakhstan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-02 14:27:35
<![CDATA[Ice sculptures installed as adornment on Central Street in Heilongjiang]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471332.htm

Photo taken on Jan 1, 2020 shows an ice sculpture that has been recently installed as adornment on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province. [Photo/Xinhua]


A child looks at an ice sculpture that has been recently installed as adornment on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province, Jan 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A sculptor works on an ice sculpture on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province, Jan 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 1, 2020 shows an ice sculpture that has been recently installed as adornment on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province. [Photo/Xinhua]


A sculptor works on an ice sculpture on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province, Jan 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 1, 2020 shows an ice sculpture that has been recently installed as adornment on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province. [Photo/Xinhua]


A sculptor works on an ice sculpture on Central Street, a main pedestrian street in downtown Harbin, capital of Northeast China's Heilongjiang province, Jan 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-02 11:19:52
<![CDATA[Incredible paper gowns made by Chinese paper-cutting master]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471330.htm

Wang Shaoliang, a 60-year-old paper-cutting master from Northwest China's Qinghai province shows gowns he made out of red paper on December 31, 2019. Paper-cutting is one of the oldest traditional Chinese art forms, and declared by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation as an intangible cultural heritage. [Photo/China News Service]


Wang Shaoliang, a 60-year-old paper-cutting master from Northwest China's Qinghai province shows gowns he made out of red paper on December 31, 2019. Paper-cutting is one of the oldest traditional Chinese art forms, and declared by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation as an intangible cultural heritage. [Photo/China News Service]


Wang Shaoliang, a 60-year-old paper-cutting master from Northwest China's Qinghai province shows gowns he made out of red paper on December 31, 2019. Paper-cutting is one of the oldest traditional Chinese art forms, and declared by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation as an intangible cultural heritage. [Photo/China News Service]

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2020-01-02 10:58:40
<![CDATA[Palace Museum to celebrate 600th anniversary of Forbidden City next year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/30/content_1471328.htm

The Palace Museum in Beijing announced Thursday plans to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the founding of the world's biggest architectural compound made of wood. [Photo by Wang Kaihao/chinadaily.com.cn]

The Palace Museum in Beijing, also known as the Forbidden City, announced Thursday plans to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the founding of the world's biggest architectural compound made of wood.

According to Wang Xudong, director of the museum, a series of highlighted exhibitions will be on display next year in the former imperial palace occupied from 1420 to 1911.

For example, A Night Revel of Han Xizai, an iconic painting in Chinese fine art history that is believed to have been created in the 10th century, will be on view to the public. Calligraphy by Su Shi, a renowned poet and artist in the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127) will be exhibited as well.


Calligraphy by Su Shi, a renowned poet and artist in the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1127) will be exhibited. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Another special exhibition will allow visitors to trace back the architectural history of the Forbidden City over the past six centuries. And the institution is to present a cooperative exhibition with Versailles in France to reflect Sino-Western cultural communication in the 17th and 18th centuries.

A new gallery displaying porcelains will be reopended to the public after renovation and redesign of exhibitions.


A Night Revel of Han Xizai, an iconic painting in Chinese fine art history that is believed to have been created in the 10th century, will be on view to the public. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Also, a series of public education projects will be organized for the anniversary. Hundreds of high school students from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan will be invited to hold cultural programs in the museum and free tours will be offered for children from poverty-stricken regions.

Abundant academic symposiums and publishing projects are scheduled next year for the anniversary.

According to statistics from the administration of the Palace Museum, 19.3 million visits were logged at the landmark in 2019, setting a new record for attendance since the Forbidden City became a public museum in 1925.


A ceramic pillow from Ding Kiln in the Northern Song Dynasty to be shown in the new porcelain gallery of the Palace Museum. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The Palace Museum in Beijing announced Thursday plans to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the founding of the world's biggest architectural compound made of wood. [Photo by Wang Kaihao/chinadaily.com.cn]


The Palace Museum in Beijing announced Thursday plans to celebrate the 600th anniversary of the founding of the world's biggest architectural compound made of wood. [Photo by Wang Kaihao/chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-12-30 17:51:47
<![CDATA[Egypt kicks off its biggest handicraft exhibition]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/29/content_1470750.htm

From Dec 26 to Jan 15, the 64th Diarna (Our Homes) handicrafts exhibition was held in Cairo. With the participation of 400 exhibitors, the event includes handmade products such as leather, textile and crochet. This year, it also offers a special pavilion for disabled craftsmen to show their works.

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2019-12-29 09:00:00
<![CDATA['Memory of the East' exhibition shows history of Egypt]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/27/content_1470749.htm

Twenty paintings created by foreign artists in the 19th century were displayed in Cairo's Memory of the East exhibition. The artworks show the life of the Egyptians and their costumes during the 19th century. A large group of artworks including Fatima by Dominique Ingres and Nile by Eugene Fromentin were showcased here.

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2019-12-27 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Palace Museum displays historic images ahead of 600th birthday]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2020-01/02/content_1471114.htm

A watchtower on the northwest corner of the Palace Museum. [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]

The Palace Museum in Beijing, also known as the Forbidden City, is about to celebrate its 600th anniversary. 

The Palace Museum released a set of photos comparing the now and then of the museum, the world's biggest architectural compound made of wood, bringing back nostalgia and respect for the grand history of the Imperial Palace.

According to Wang Xudong, director of the museum, a series of highlighted exhibitions will be on display next year in the former imperial palace occupied from 1420 to 1911.


A view of the Palace Musem from Beijing's Jingshan Park. [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]


Yanxi Palace [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]


The Meridian Gate (Wu Men) [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]


Gate of Supreme Harmony (Taihe Men) [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]


Imperial Supremacy Hall (Huangji Dian) [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]


The Hall of Harmony (Yihexuan) [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]


Gate of Supreme Harmony (Taihe Men) [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum] 


Wuying Gate [Photo/Official Sina Weibo account of the Palace Museum]

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2020-01-02 10:38:51
<![CDATA[Concert raises curtain on Haidian's cultural season]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/31/content_1471112.htm

The 2020 New Year's concert of the Haidian district in Beijing wrapped up on Monday at the China ethnic song and dance ensemble's theater. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The 2020 New Year's concert of the Haidian district in Beijing wrapped up on Monday at the China ethnic song and dance ensemble's theater, attracting nearly 1,000 concertgoers.

That also raised the curtain of the 10th New Year performance season in the district, which will invite the National Ballet of China, the Northern Kunqu Opera Theatrical Group, St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra and other renowned art troupes from home and abroad to stage over 200 shows at such venues as Beijing National Library Art Centre and Inside-Out Theater in the next three months.

To encourage more people to step into theaters or concert halls, Haidian district's culture and tourism bureau will give tickets on discount to those who buy them online. Meanwhile, free cultural lectures will be delivered to the public to lift their level of aesthetic knowledge.

According to Liu Lan, vice-director of the bureau, over 70 million yuan ($10 million) has been spent on the annual performance season and ticket discounts since its initiation in 2011, which helped the season grow into an influential cultural event of Haidian district.


The 2020 New Year's concert of the Haidian district in Beijing wrapped up on Monday at the China ethnic song and dance ensemble's theater. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The 2020 New Year's concert of the Haidian district in Beijing wrapped up on Monday at the China ethnic song and dance ensemble's theater. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The 2020 New Year's concert of the Haidian district in Beijing wrapped up on Monday at the China ethnic song and dance ensemble's theater. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The 2020 New Year's concert of the Haidian district in Beijing wrapped up on Monday at the China ethnic song and dance ensemble's theater. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-12-31 15:55:20
<![CDATA[New terracotta warriors uncovered at emperor's mausoleum]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/31/content_1471110.htm

Pictured is a golden camel found during the latest round of excavation in the Mausoleum of the Emperor Qinshihuang, media reported on Monday. It is believed to be the most ancient single body golden camel that has ever been seen in the country, which indicates early exchange between China and the West. [Photo provided to China News Service]


More than 220 new terracotta warriors with five different official titles, including senior military ranks, have been unearthed during the third excavation at the Mausoleum of the Emperor Qinshihuang. A new military rank, dubbed "lower than the lowest," was found by archeologists at the site, according to a Monday report of Shaanxi TV station based in Xi'an, capital of Northwest China's Shaanxi province. [Photo provided to China News Service]


More than 220 new terracotta warriors with five different official titles, including senior military ranks, have been unearthed during the third excavation at the Mausoleum of the Emperor Qinshihuang. A new military rank, dubbed "lower than the lowest," was found by archeologists at the site, according to a Monday report of Shaanxi TV station based in Xi'an, capital of Northwest China's Shaanxi province. [Photo provided to China News Service]


More than 220 new terracotta warriors with five different official titles, including senior military ranks, have been unearthed during the third excavation at the Mausoleum of the Emperor Qinshihuang. A new military rank, dubbed "lower than the lowest," was found by archeologists at the site, according to a Monday report of Shaanxi TV station based in Xi'an, capital of Northwest China's Shaanxi province. [Photo provided to China News Service]


More than 220 new terracotta warriors with five different official titles, including senior military ranks, have been unearthed during the third excavation at the Mausoleum of the Emperor Qinshihuang. A new military rank, dubbed "lower than the lowest," was found by archeologists at the site, according to a Monday report of Shaanxi TV station based in Xi'an, capital of Northwest China's Shaanxi province. [Photo provided to China News Service]

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2019-12-31 11:02:47
<![CDATA[Beautiful salt crystal formations in salt lake]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/31/content_1471108.htm

Glauber salt crystals form on the frozen Salt Lake in Yuncheng city, North China's Shanxi province, December 28, 2019. The lake is one of three inland salt lakes containing sodium sulfate in the world. The amount of salt it contains is similar to that of the Dead Sea and allows humans to float on it. [Photo/China News Service]


Glauber salt crystals form on the frozen Salt Lake in Yuncheng city, North China's Shanxi province, December 28, 2019. The lake is one of three inland salt lakes containing sodium sulfate in the world. The amount of salt it contains is similar to that of the Dead Sea and allows humans to float on it. [Photo/China News Service]


Glauber salt crystals form on the frozen Salt Lake in Yuncheng city, North China's Shanxi province, December 28, 2019. The lake is one of three inland salt lakes containing sodium sulfate in the world. The amount of salt it contains is similar to that of the Dead Sea and allows humans to float on it. [Photo/China News Service]


Glauber salt crystals form on the frozen Salt Lake in Yuncheng city, North China's Shanxi province, December 28, 2019. The lake is one of three inland salt lakes containing sodium sulfate in the world. The amount of salt it contains is similar to that of the Dead Sea and allows humans to float on it. [Photo/China News Service]

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2019-12-31 10:38:17
<![CDATA[Peaceful starry night at Bayanbulak Grassland in Xinjiang]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/31/content_1471106.htm

The photo taken on December 27, 2019 shows a river and surrounding areas at Bayanbulak Grassland in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. Snow, ice, and rime turn the place into a winter wonderland. [Photo/China News Service]


The photo taken on December 27, 2019 shows a river and surrounding areas at Bayanbulak Grassland in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. Snow, ice, and rime turn the place into a winter wonderland. [Photo/China News Service]


The photo taken on December 27, 2019 shows a river and surrounding areas at Bayanbulak Grassland in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. Snow, ice, and rime turn the place into a winter wonderland. [Photo/China News Service]

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2019-12-31 10:28:12
<![CDATA[To his art's content]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/31/content_1471104.htm

A royal maiden, inspired by Spanish master painter Diego Velazquez's Las Meninas, from Wu's solo exhibition Menina, staged at the Today Art Museum in Beijing from April-July. [Photo provided to China Daily]

It's been a long journey for an architect from Henan to fulfill his childhood dream of making it as an artist, Zhu Linyong reports.

"Art is my religion," declares Wu Ningya, an architect and artist from Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, on Dec 18 at the opening of Melting Objects.

Running through Jan 8 at Xi Space in the Debi Cultural and Creative Industry Park in Beijing's Dongcheng district, the show is the second installment of his debut solo exhibition, Menina.

Melting Objects builds on the success of the event held at the Today Art Museum in April, a large-scale multidisciplinary show centered around Diego Velazquez's painting Las Meninas.

"It was my childhood dream to become an artist. The desire to create timeless art has always been hidden in the depths of my heart," says Wu, 56. "Now that I have obtained financial freedom, I would like to pursue inner freedom through art."

But when Wu abruptly declared his decision to "embrace art wholeheartedly" at his 50th birthday party on April 6, 2013, his colleagues, friends and family were a little shocked-prompting some to think it was simply a moment of madness.

The veteran architect told them that he would quit all his business undertakings and devote the rest of his life to artistic creation.

"It was not a hasty decision. I thought about it over and again." Wu says, adding that he "had been preparing for that day for years".


Architect-turned-artist Wu Ningya. [PHOTO BY CHEN XINYU/CHINA DAILY]

Wu was born in a family of intellectuals in Luoyang, Henan province, on April 6, 1963, three years before the beginning of the "cultural revolution" (1966-76), a chaotic period when his family suffered as the offspring of wealthy landlords.

To survive the suffocating social circumstances, the Wu family had covertly sought consolation from literature and art.

Wu's parents and grandparents, all avid readers of the classics and enthusiasts of the traditional arts, taught him about poetry, myths and legends, as well as calligraphy and ink painting.

"Their passion for refined and artistic living, even in hard times, exerted an indelible impact on me," recalls Wu, who collects artifacts from ancient Greece, prehistoric fossils and Gandhara Buddhist artworks, and owns a private library boasting over 30,000 rare books.

Yet in his younger years, Wu could not find enough books to satisfy his insatiable thirst for knowledge.

He was so curious and eager to understand the world around that he "almost grabbed anything with printed characters to read". He developed an exceptional capacity for memorizing all the texts in the Xinhua Zidian, a popular dictionary for generations of Chinese primary school students.


Wu Ningya's Oracle Bones series is among the most eye-catching showpieces of his ongoing solo exhibition in Beijing. [PHOTO BY ZHU LINYONG/CHINA DAILY]

Although Wu was widely considered as an outstanding student, he failed to enroll at university for reasons he has never really figured out. He instead ended up studying stage design for Peking Opera troupes at a local training school. Upon graduation, he landed a job at the Henan Provincial Peking Opera Theater.

But Wu refused to give up on his childhood dream. He soon quit his job at the state-run art institution and joined an advertising company as a designer. While working there, Wu recalls, he was keen to learn a broad range of painting methods and techniques with a view to developing his future artistic creations.

Later on, Wu worked in the lucrative real estate sector as an architect. From 1989 to 2013, he set up many businesses-from advertising, architecture, interior design and fashion design, to running a private club, an art gallery and other hospitality and catering operations.

Wu frequently travels from Henan to other parts of the country and abroad.

Despite his hectic work schedule, Wu devoted most of his spare time and energy visiting art exhibitions and biennials and attending art auctions, making case studies of prominent artists, and exposing himself extensively to diverse art genres, styles and trends, he says.


A visitor takes a photo at artist Wu Ningya's solo show Melting Objects at Xi Space in the Debi Cultural and Creative Industry Park in Beijing, which runs through Jan 8. [PHOTO BY ZHU LINYONG/CHINA DAILY]

When the globe-trotter first saw Las Meninas, the 1656 masterpiece by Diego Velazquez, a leading exponent of the Spanish Golden Age (1521-1643), at Prado Museum in Madrid in 2008, he was enthralled.

In the following years, Wu paid more visits to the museum, reading up on Spanish art from that era.

He found that Las Meninas was one of the most widely analyzed and imitated works in Western painting. Its complex and enigmatic composition raises questions about reality and illusion, and creates an uneasy relationship between the viewer and the figures depicted.

"Quite a few big shots, including Picasso and Dali, had created artworks of various types, imitating or reinterpreting Velazquez's Las Meninas," says Wu, who felt an itch to create something of his own.

But it would not be until late 2015 before he started the work, after delving through piles of books, magazines, and catalogs on history, the arts, culture, sociology, anthropology, philosophy and science, in the "hope of laying a solid theoretical foundation for artistic creation".

Wu holds that unlike a craftsman, a serious artist must have a superb command of human knowledge, especially philosophy, and develop a clear, systematic world view besides mastering the techniques, methods and skills for original and ingenious works.

Taking Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) as a role model, Wu has nourished an ambition for self-attainment: ultimately becoming an all-round or crossover artist, a thinker, scholar and writer, "publishing at least one book a year".

The bulk of work for the Menina exhibition took Wu four years to materialize. And the art project also came at a huge personal cost, Wu admits. He sold some houses to buy materials for his installations.

But Wu kept Menina under wraps until late 2018, when he met Gao Peng, the director and curator of the Today Art Museum in Beijing.

Calling him "the artist who impressed me the most in 2018-knowledgeable, passionate and full of energy", at an academic seminar on Wu's Menina on April 26, Gao invited Wu to hold his first solo show in the Chinese capital.

Wu turned down the request at first, thinking his creations were still immature. But Gao insisted it was the right time for Wu to "stand out as a vanguard artist", prompting Wu to finally agree.


An exhibit from Wu's TCM series features a unicorn, a popular motif in Western culture. [Photo provided to China Daily]

At the opening of Menina, the first installment of Wu's Beijing solo exhibition on April 20 at the Today Art Museum, Wu recalls being "extremely nervous and excited".

"I was unsure how the average viewer or the wider art community would respond to my maiden exhibition," Wu tells China Daily in Beijing.

Occupying the spacious, two-story Exhibition Hall No 3 of the museum, the large-scale exhibition highlighted the artist's in-depth and multidimensional investigation and interpretation of Diego Velazquez's Las Meninas, with a myriad of gigantic oil paintings, sketches, sculptures, installations and new media pieces.

Staged from April to July at the Today Art Museum, Menina turned out to be an artistic and social phenomenon, attracting immense academic interest and public attention.

Around 30,000 visitors paid 20 yuan per ticket to savor the artistic creations by a greenhorn "from out of nowhere".

More than 200 newspapers, magazines, websites and social media influencers published photo stories, reviews about the exhibition and profiles of the little-known artist.

"A newcomer to the contemporary Chinese art scene, Wu has shown an amazing ability to construct a set of artistic languages with a distinctive personal trait," commented Wang Meng, a researcher with the National Art Museum of China, at the seminar on Menina.

"With this heavyweight solo exhibition, Wu has managed to put a piece of classic Western art into the dynamic context of contemporary China, evoking memories about history and raising questions about the direction of China's vanguard art movement," according to Phoenix Art, an art media company in Beijing.

More importantly, "Wu's site-specific art project has successfully torn down the boundaries, making it possible for viewers to look at an iconic artwork from multiple perspectives, and to interact with artworks in an immersive way. This is an unprecedented phenomenon," said Yang Wei, a Changsha-based critic at the seminar on Menina.


An artwork from Wu's Taihu Rock series at Xi Space. [PHOTO BY ZHU LINYONG/CHINA DAILY]

The well-received exhibition gave a huge boost to Wu's self-confidence as an artist who, in his own words, "then rushed back to my home city of Zhengzhou to prepare for the second installment of the Beijing solo exhibition."

Wu was eager to place another bulk of his artistic work, created in secrecy at a 6,000 square meter studio in suburban Zhengzhou between 2014 and 2019, under academic and public scrutiny, "like a primary schoolboy waiting impatiently for the teacher's words about his newly completed homework".

While the Today Art Museum exhibition focused on Wu's endeavors to participate in cross-cultural dialogue, the second installment offers audiences the chance to examine the artist's exploration of Chinese cultural heritage and ancient philosophy, explains Zhang Quan, art connoisseur and curator of the Melting Objects show.

Arguably the most eye-catching and thought-provoking works are Wu's Oracle Bones series, the Taihu Rock series and the traditional Chinese medicine series, which Wu has been working on continuously since 2014.

To casual viewers, the Oracle Bones series look like the fossil bones of some unknown prehistoric creatures.

"They are a duplicated version of the oracle bones, first found in Anyang, Henan, in 1899-enlarged in size, inscribed with Chinese characters, and patched with fragmented pages from ancient books-imitations of course," Wu says.

The Taihu Rock series is much like the decorative rocks, produced in the area surrounding Taihu Lake in East China's Jiangsu province, long favored by ancient scholars who usually placed them in their studios alongside hanging scrolls and potted plants. Actually, Wu meticulously carved them out of camphor wood and coated them with gradations of colors.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

The most challenging works are for the TCM series, ones which Wu has been constantly developing and improving since 2015.

The basic idea behind the TCM series is to represent cultural motifs and totems through iconic images from civilizations from around the world, by filling pre-coated stainless steel frames with over 300 traditional Chinese medicines-from minerals and herbs to the remains of animals. And then, the newly-coined images are solidified with synthetic crystals.

The second installment of Wu's first debut show has also received positive responses.

"Each artwork approaches human civilizations from differing dimensions: evolution and mutation; culture and nature; the past, present and the future; the living, the dead and the eternal. Together, they construct a grand, historical narrative about the human condition," says Peng Feng, an art researcher with Peking University.

"Wu's art touches upon the Chinese heritage of oracle bones, the Taoist philosophy of the oneness of man and nature, and new possibilities of cross-cultural dialogue," comments Zhang Jianxing, a viewer who is also the managing publisher of a local newspaper. "His attempt to deconstruct traditional culture and transform it into new culture, successful or not, is commendable in that it opens up our hearts and minds to an alternative future."

So what's next for the artist? Like a high school student who has just passed the gaokao, China's national college entrance exam, Wu says, he is looking to widen his audience on the international art scene.

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2019-12-31 07:43:47
<![CDATA[Immersing travelers in art at play]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/30/content_1471102.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Pullman Fuzhou Tahoe recently offered a rare treat for art lovers by offering access to the artwork the brand commissioned from renowned Chinese artist Long Di.

Following a lively art workshop, Pullman Fuzhou Tahoe provided an immersive "Pullman Art Trip" tea break featuring a selection of bites with artistic thrills.

This event was the latest showcase of the Art at Play initiative, from Accor's upbeat contemporary brand Pullman.

The initiative aims to connect guests with contemporary art and encourage them to interact and play with art through their journey with a vibrant yet subtle touch.

A captivating story is told through five of Long's paintings. Each interprets a unique contemporary social scene embodying the features and promises of the Pullman brand.

"The comfort level is not the only criterion on which to judge a hotel in this era when people have a mobile life and travel a lot," said Gao Xiao, Pullman Fuzhou Tahoe's director of marketing. "Hotels like us have an added bonus of bringing immersive experiences to guests."


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-12-30 19:51:55
<![CDATA[What's most appealing about Chinese culture?]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/31/content_1470717.htm

During the just-concluded 2019, we interviewed a good number of foreign diplomats stationed in China, as well as several prominent cultural figures across the world. Of all the various facets in Chinese culture, which part do they find the most appealing? Please click the video to see more.

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2019-12-31 11:57:40
<![CDATA[British museum celebrates upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/25/content_1469804.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Royal Museums Greenwich, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in the UK as well as home to the iconic Royal Observatory Greenwich and Cutty Sark sailing ship, plans to celebrate the approaching Chinese Lunar New Year with a program that covers a rich mix of cultural activities.

The program features traditional Chinese performance arts including lion dance and kung fu, craft making of hongbao (red packets containing money usually given by senior members of families to the young during Lunar New Year), traditional Chinese New Year storytelling of Nian, a beast related to the origin of the Chinese Spring Festival, as well as a wide array of activities that allows visitors to explore various facets of Chinese history and culture.

2020 is the Year of the Rat and the forthcoming Spring Festival will fall on Jan 25, 2020.

If you go

Date: January 25, 2020

Time: 11:00?6:00

Venue: National Maritime Museum

Admission: Free

Age: Suitable for all ages

Visit www.rmg.co.uk for further information


Royal Museums Greenwich, a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as home to the iconic Royal Observatory Greenwich and Cutty Sark sailing ship, plans to celebrate the approaching Chinese Lunar New Year with a program that covers a rich mix of cultural activities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Royal Museums Greenwich, a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as home to the iconic Royal Observatory Greenwich and Cutty Sark sailing ship, plans to celebrate the approaching Chinese Lunar New Year with a program that covers a rich mix of cultural activities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Royal Museums Greenwich, a UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as home to the iconic Royal Observatory Greenwich and Cutty Sark sailing ship, plans to celebrate the approaching Chinese Lunar New Year with a program that covers a rich mix of cultural activities.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-12-25 14:25:31
<![CDATA[Tens of thousands of horses gallop on snowy grassland in Xinjiang]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/26/content_1469797.htm

Tourists in Northwest China's Zhaosu county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, witnessed a splendid scene of tens of thousands of horses galloping in a snowy grassland. [Photo/China News Service]

Zhaosu county is dubbed by Chinese people as the "Home to Horses from Heaven". Normally, these horses are fed in stables. But herdsmen occasionally release them to run on the vast grassland to exercise their bodies, which has gradually become one of the main attractions for tourists. In winter, the local government regularly gathers these horses together to form a grand scene the majestic creatures thundering across the grassland.


Tourists in Northwest China's Zhaosu county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, witnessed a splendid scene of tens of thousands of horses galloping in a snowy grassland. [Photo/China News Service]


Tourists in Northwest China's Zhaosu county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, witnessed a splendid scene of tens of thousands of horses galloping in a snowy grassland. [Photo/China News Service]


Tourists in Northwest China's Zhaosu county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, witnessed a splendid scene of tens of thousands of horses galloping in a snowy grassland. [Photo/China News Service]

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2019-12-26 10:57:30
<![CDATA[Drawing from the past]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/26/content_1469738.htm

The main character, Dilili, rides a leopard in the animated film, Dilili in Paris, created by French director Michel Ocelet. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The latest movie by a famous French animator is a dark children's tale set against the backdrop of Paris during the Belle Epoque, Xu Fan reports.

A legend in the world of French cinematic animation, 76-year-old auteur Michel Ocelot recently visited China with his latest directorial outing, Dilili in Paris, winner of the best animated film at the 2019 Cesar Awards-the French equivalent of the Oscars.

The movie, which opened the Annecy Film Festival in 2018, was released in Chinese mainland theaters on Saturday.

Told from the perspective of a child, a method Ocelot often adopts, the story sees Dilili, a 6-year-old Kanak girl from New Caledonia-a French territory in the South Pacific-team up with a delivery boy to probe a string of mysterious child kidnappings in the French capital.

While the plot may sound a little flat to fans of the genre, the film should attract arthouse enthusiasts as it's something of a love letter to Paris during the Belle Epoque period-a famous artistic heyday for France between the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


Dilili's adventures lead her to meet a string of historical figures, including scientist Marie Curie (right) and actress Sarah Bernhardt (center). [Photo provided to China Daily]

During their investigations, the amateur detective duo meet more than 60 cultural figures and scientists of the time-from Nobel laureate Marie Curie to novelist Marcel Proust to biologist Louis Pasteur.

Of all the famous names in Paris, Emma Calve-the French operatic soprano famed for performing the lead in Georges Bizet's Carmen-plays a key role in helping Dilili and delivery boy Orel on their mission.

"I chose the year 1900 as the set for my film, as I believe it was a beautiful era that saw many of the world's finest and most talented artists and scientists gather in Paris. Despite having all passed away, their legacy will benefit humankind now and forever," Ocelot told China Daily during a recent visit to Beijing.

But there were characteristics of the era that Ocelot-who defines himself as a "global citizen"-feels uneasy and regretful about, realizing that Europe at that time only acknowledged the achievements made by white people.

With his childhood memories of family life in the West African country of Guinea and his knowledge of literature, the director developed the character of Dilili, a mixed-race child not regarded as "one of us" either by the Africans or the Europeans depicted in the film.


The film displays Paris' landmark attractions, such as the Eiffel Tower. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"It's not just about racial identity. I want to explore the diversity of culture. In some senses, I am like a child with a sweet tooth, who wants to taste candy from every corner of the world," the animator says.

The animation also features a two-dimensional hand-drawn style, set against the photorealistic backdrops of landmark attractions in Paris, from the Moulin Rouge to Le Bateau-Lavoir.

Ocelot reveals that all the backdrops were digitally transformed from photographs of the iconic buildings, as he believed there was no need to redraw the breathtaking Parisian landscapes already familiar to audiences around the world.

But behind the picturesque scenery, the ugly truths uncovered by the duo are as dark as they are terrible.

Under the control of an insane misogynist, the kidnappers abduct young girls from the streets of Paris and train them to become so-called "crawling people", who are forced to walk on all fours and serve as "benches" for men to sit on and rest.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

This rather exaggerated metaphor refers to the struggle by women for gender equality over the centuries. Ocelot says he believes it is utterly wrong to consider women as "inferior to men".

"Although I am fascinated by glittering and enduring civilizations and cultures, I'm scared by the dark chapters of history and the malice shown toward women. We would be much happier if men and women were treated equally," he says.

As the former president of the International Animated Film Association, Ocelot says he has long held a strong interest in Chinese animation, especially Shanghai Animation Film Studio's classics, such as Three Monsters and Little Tadpoles in Search of Their Mother.

Chinese culture has also become his new source of artistic inspiration, reveals the director, who is planning to make the 15-minute animated flick, A Dream Lover, inspired by his visit to see the ancient architecture in Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province, a few years ago.


[Photo provided to China Daily]

"The Chinese story will be about the daughter of a pharmacy owner," reveals Ocelot.

The meticulous filmmaker usually spends six years producing a film. But Ocelot intends to produce his upcoming works-which will include a feature-length anthology of three short tales set in Egypt and France-more quickly.

Born in Villefranche-sur-Mer in 1943, the artist who has been devoted to animation for over half a century jokingly suggests his passion developed in the mid-1940s at the age of 18 months.

"I always liked to scribble on paper or anything else that was available. There were no TV sets in my childhood, so I had to create my own amusement. Thanks to painting and animation, they continue to make me happy and have now become part of my life," says an emotional Ocelot.


[Photo provided to China Daily]


[Photo provided to China Daily]


[Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-12-26 08:54:36
<![CDATA[Chinese novelist Lao She's 'The Story of Niu Tianci' takes center stage]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/26/content_1469736.htm

A scene from The Story of Niu Tianci. [Photo by Zhang Rui/China Daily]

The Story of Niu Tianci, a Chinese play based on Chinese author Lao She's 1934 novel of the same name, premiered in Beijing's Tianqiao Performing Arts Center on Dec 25. Directed by Fang Xu, who has adapted five of Lao She's works into theatrical productions, and featuring young Chinese actors, including Guo Qilin in the lead role, the play will be staged till Dec 29 before it tours nationwide in 2020.

Unlike Lao She's other novels, such as Rickshaw Boy and Four Generations Under One Roof, The Story of Niu Tianci is less well-known and has never been adapted into a movie, TV series or theatrical production. 

Born as Shu Qingchun to a Manchu family in Beijing in 1899, Lao She is best known for his vivid descriptions of grassroots life that reflect social reality and for his precise depictions of local Beijing culture through his unique humor and use of the city's dialect. His novels, including Rickshaw Boy and Four Generations Under One Roof, and his plays, such as Long Xu Gou (Dragon Beard Ditch) and Teahouse, have earned him fame as a linguistic and literary master worldwide.


A scene from The Story of Niu Tianci. [Photo by Zhang Rui/China Daily]

The Story of Niu Tianci revolves around a young man, named Niu Tianci, an abandoned child, who was adopted by a childless couple. Niu's mother wanted him to become a government official, while his father hoped he would take over the family business. As a young man, Niu attended the best school and was an obedient student. But contrary to his parent's wishes, Niu learned very little and struggled with the social environment. He was lost and alone when his parents died. 

An all-male 17-member cast plays both male and female roles in the play. Guo Qilin, a 23-year-old crosstalk, or xiangsheng, performer, makes his stage debut with the role, Niu Tianci. Guo's longtime partner and crosstalk performer Yan Hexiang also makes his stage debut playing the role of Niu's best friend, the personification of a front gate pillar-a role that doesn't exist in Lao She's original novel.

Guo Qilin has built up a sizeable fan base after he made his debut crosstalk performance in 2011. He has expanded his career into movies and TV dramas.


A scene from The Story of Niu Tianci. [Photo by Zhang Rui/China Daily]

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2019-12-26 08:46:34
<![CDATA[In search of a silver lining]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/26/content_1469734.htm

A scene from the film Only Cloud Knows, which tells of the bittersweet romance between a couple of Chinese expatriates in New Zealand, with the husband played by actor Huang Xuan and wife by actress Yang Caiyu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Feng Xiaogang's latest movie sees the stars of Youth reunite for a bittersweet story about enduring love, loss and isolation overseas set against the stunning backdrop of New Zealand, Xu Fan reports.

When actor Huang Xuan was shooting an advertisement earlier this year, he took a call from director Feng Xiaogang, a man who was once hailed as "China's (Steven) Spielberg" by the American magazine Newsweek.

"Mr Feng asked me if I had time to hear a story," recalls Huang in a recent interview with China Daily ahead of the Beijing premiere of Only Cloud Knows.

Then, over the course of the next 20 minutes, Huang-who starred in Feng's 2017 runaway hit Youth-came to hear about the story of an enduring 36-year-long romance between a couple of close friends of the famous director, Zhang Shu and Luo Yang.

"I met Mr Zhang when I was shooting Youth. But this was the first time to learn about his past and suffering. Feng is such an excellent storyteller that his detailed depictions quickly stirred my emotions and brought a tear to my eye," recalls Huang.

Both natives of the Chinese capital, Feng shared a dormitory with Zhang when they worked together in an art troupe of the People's Liberation Army in the early 1980s.


A scene from the film Only Cloud Knows, which tells of the bittersweet romance between a couple of Chinese expatriates in New Zealand, with the husband played by actor Huang Xuan and wife by actress Yang Caiyu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Back then, most people were reluctant to talk about romance, but Zhang soon asked Feng for advice after confessing to falling in love with Luo at first sight on a bus ride.

The couple later married and emigrated to Canada. Zhang returned to Beijing in 2003 to work on Feng's film, and stayed for over a decade. Unfortunately, Luo was later diagnosed with cancer and passed away in Toronto in 2017.

Widely regarded as a front-runner who helped to propel the Chinese film industry with his stylish comedy blockbusters like The Dream Factory (1997) and Cellphone (2003), Feng in recent years has adopted a more personal and nostalgic approach as seen in movies like Youth.

Feng was moved when Zhang opened up about his feelings for his late wife, especially as he had just happened to catch iconic Japanese actor Ken Takakura's last film Dearest-a story about a retired prison warden who fulfills his dead wife's last wish-which also tugged his heartstrings.

All these elements helped give rise to Only Cloud Knows, his latest movie currently on release in China, New Zealand, Australia, North America and the United Kingdom.

Penned by novelist-turned-scriptwriter Zhang Ling, whose 2009 novel Aftershock was adapted by Feng into a disaster flick of the same name in 2010, Only Cloud Knows by contrast has a narrative that unfolds at a much slower pace.


A scene from the film Only Cloud Knows, which tells of the bittersweet romance between a couple of Chinese expatriates in New Zealand, with the husband played by actor Huang Xuan and wife by actress Yang Caiyu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Set principally in picturesque New Zealand, the 132-minute film follows the story of a Chinese expatriate who travels over 15,000 kilometers to fulfill his late wife's wishes, returning some of her ashes to her hometown in China and scattering more into the sea at a whale-watching spot near in New Zealand.

Through a series of flashbacks, the story unfolds how the couple fell in love when they rented separate rooms in a Chinese woman's house in Auckland, and later, their painstaking efforts in setting up their Chinese restaurant in the small town of Clyde in southern New Zealand.

Huang, 34, stars as the grieving husband, while 27-year-old actress Yang Caiyu plays his wife. The new movie marks their reunion after appearing as the main characters in Youth.

Yang, whose father died of cancer two years ago, recalls that she could appreciate the sentimental tone of the movie from her own parents' love story.

"My mother's situation is much like the husband's in the film. They have both been left in the sorrow of loneliness halfway along life's path," Yang explains.

Both of the stars spent a long time preparing for their roles in order to convey the bittersweet romance and the characters' sense of isolation and loneliness as expatriates.


(From right) Director Feng Xiaogang alongside actor Huang Xuan, actresses Yang Caiyu and Lydia Peckham, who plays a waitress, at the Beijing premiere on Dec 17. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]

Since a number of Huang's lines were written in English, he recruited a native speaker to act as a voice coach to "force" him to only speak English for the entire duration of the shoot.

On the other hand, Yang studied in the United States and has a good command of English, so she devised a way to make herself sound like a novice speaker.

"I wrote the Chinese characters under the English lines on the script to make me pronounce each phrase a bit awkwardly. So my lines in the film came across as sounding quite 'Chinglish'," Yang smiles.

Both stars also received culinary training to help them perform their scenes in the kitchen at the restaurant owned by the protagonist couple in Clyde.

"I'm still a bachelor and I have yet to reach the same age as the character's age (who is depicted in the movie as being in his mid-40s). So I had to draw on my most mature and complex emotions to imagine the psychological state of this middle-aged man who had suffered the pain of his wife passing away," Huang says of his approach to the role that spans 17 years in the movie.


A poster of the film. [Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]

Despite facing the challenges of acting and language, Huang had some happy and unforgettable moments with a special "actor" named Blue-a stray dog the couple adopted in the film.

"I was surprised to see that a dog could be so smart to follow all the acting commands from the director ?such as pretending to be weak and suffering from breathing difficulties," recalls Huang.

Yang adds: "The dog is a famous star in New Zealand and has appeared in several films and TV series. I was told that I should establish an intimate relationship with him (the dog is depicted as a key member of the family in the movie), so I always had some delicious sausages in my pocket."

By Tuesday the film had grossed around 110 million yuan ($15.7 million), outperforming Disney's epic Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker but still overshadowed by the box-office takings from Donnie Yen's final action film, Ip Man 4.

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2019-12-26 07:55:50
<![CDATA[Chinese tourists' enthusiasm for winter sports boosts Finnish tourism]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/24/content_1469331.htm The rising number of Chinese tourists has contributed to the growth of Finnish tourism, according to Finnish national broadcaster Yle.

Citing booking numbers from Visit Finland, the report said a total of 140,000 Chinese tourists are coming to Finland from December 2019 to February 2020, up 16 percent from last winter.

Direct flights from China to Finland are the driving force for the tourist growth. China's Juneyao Air, Tibet Airlines and Sichuan Airlines all started flights to Helsinki in 2019.

Finland's national carrier Finnair also started to offer thrice weekly flights to Beijing Daxing International Airport this autumn, in addition to the seven weekly flights to Beijing Capital International Airport.

Among popular attractions for Chinese tourists are Lapland, Finland's northernmost region, and the Paljakka ski resort in Puolanka, a small town in central Finland with only 2,600 residents.

About 200 Chinese tourists visited the resort in 2018. This year the number has soared to 500. Due to the small size of Paljakka, Chinese tourists arriving around Christmas this year have to be divided into eight groups and take turns to visit the resort, the report noted.

Mika Puuronen, CEO of North Finlandia Travels Company, which runs hotels and skiing trails in Paljakka, told Yle that the challenge for the company is insufficient hotel beds and they are trying to address it.

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2019-12-24 15:11:12
<![CDATA[Gala spotlights rising stars in Chinese contemporary dance]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/24/content_1469343.htm

Dancers are seen in silhouette in a scene from the dancing piece  Don't I Know You. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

From The Martial Dance that adds a modern touch to traditional Chinese kung fu to Sacrifice that mixes ballet with modern dance, from Inside that digs deeply into complicated human emotions of loneliness and love, to 32 Chapters that seeks an answer in the years after one's 30s... a year-end gala has brought to the center stage rising choreographers and dancers in the Chinese contemporary dance scene.

Performance clips from eight choreographers' works were featured on two nights of shows, from Nov 24 to 25, at the Beijing National Theater, which fully displayed the vitality and creativity of young Chinese dancers: Their artistic exploration and focuses on individuals, social reality and world issues.

It's also aimed at celebrating the fifth anniversary of the National Youth Dancers Development Plan, a Chinese contemporary dance platform initiated by the China Dancers Association in 2014.

In interviews with China Daily website, Wen Xiaochao, the choreographer of 32 Chapters, and Gong Xingxing, the choreographer of Inside, shared behind-the-scenes stories.


A stage photo of 32 Chapters. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Turning a new chapter on life

Indie choreographer and dancer Wen Xiaochao turned 32 in 2018, which motivated him to create the work 32 Chapters, named after his age at the time.

"It's about faith, about dreams. There is beauty in this dream. There are heartbroken moments. There is loneliness that you have to bear, but still, it's very positive," he said. "As long as you stick to this dream, you can see the silver linings behind the clouds."

The 20-odd-minute performance clip on Nov 25 started in the dynamic rhythm of Come As You Are, a song written by the American band Nirvana's frontman Kurt Cobain, with six dancers dressed in loose black clothing swinging freely to the infectious beat of the music.

They soon shifted to six sentimental solos, portraying different kinds of solitude and ways to ward it off. Fragile or powerful, they were spectacular displays of techniques and hearts, sharing with the audience their deepest fears and passions.

Wen says these solos are his favorite part. "Each of us demonstrates loneliness in our own ways. I hope to dig out their different personalities through these solos," Wen says.

Standing at a crossroads in his dance career, he said, "I used to pay a lot of attention to the dance techniques - my priority was often on how to fully present the physical beauty. But as I grow older, now I value more the meaning behind these dance moves."  

Wen's dance career started with ballet and folk dance at the age of 13. He switched to contemporary dance at 18. He graduated from the Beijing Dance Academy, where he got the opportunity to study contemporary dance choreography in New Zealand for a year as an exchange student. That year had helped nurture the openness and more creative, bold thinking in his later works.

"I think the choreography of dancers in my generation has become very diversified in recent years. Everyone touches on different topics, exploring different possibilities of human bodies. They fully express themselves, which is very different from previous years when dancers, more often than not, imitated each other," he said.

"Now their works embody more personal thinking. They've formed their own vocabulary. This vocabulary means their own styles and ways of expression."


A scene from Inside. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Love melts loneliness

The sentimental choreography of Inside has humor, love and a touch of boldness, but most of all, emotions that resonate with everyone: the co-existence of loneliness and love, as well as the inevitable connections with people in social lives.

The dancers came to the stage with caution and curiosity, like a child when born into the world. They interact with each other in a cautious manner. They fall into unexpected collisions sometimes. They hug to soothe each other. They get refreshed, walk on or walk away.

"I hope to connect people with love. Love is something that brings warmth to us. For me, love can melt everything," Gong said. "Because I'm very straightforward, my way of speaking may hurt people sometimes. But they tolerated me. Such tolerance made me tender."


A scene from Inside. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The 18-minute clip of Inside was selected from its original 70-minute work that Gong created in 2018. It's partly inspired by Gabrielle Zevin's novel, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, which tells how the messy life of middle-aged bookstore owner A.J. Fikry was reframed after the arrival of a mysterious package - an unexpected baby that had saved him from the deadlock of solitude.

"Because of the arrival of the abandoned baby, his life was changed gradually. So I think love and emotional bonds could completely change a person."

Gong says she is now pushing herself to explore a larger world of dance, trying to fuse it more with music and plays.

"Currently I feel it's the time to cooperate with theatrical artists and musicians to look for more possibilities in art production. Because dancing has its limitations."

"Contemporary dance is still niche in China. The audience is small. Many people say it's hard to understand so they don't go to see it. In this regard, Lin Hwai-min is a hero. He's brought contemporary dance to audiences in so many different places."


A stage photo of The Martial Dance. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

In 1973, Lin Hwai-min founded Cloud Gate Dance Theater, the first contemporary dance company in Taiwan. His dancers have since performed in both urban and rural areas across Taiwan, which largely helped promote the development of contemporary art in Taiwan. Time magazine has described Cloud Gate as "Asia's leading contemporary dance theater".  

"Recently I got the chance to teach contemporary dance to children ages 6 to 9. They actually like it. They just didn't get the opportunity to know it earlier. So I think the teaching of contemporary dance could start earlier in future. This is a creative art that could help free children's inner selves," Gong continued.

The National Youth Dancers Development Plan is an annual project sponsored by the China Literature and Art Federation to train and cultivate young dancers. Over the past five years, the project has supported nearly 200 young talents. Their dance works have been shown in 22 cities in 13 countries around the globe.

Contact the writer at li-ping@chinadaily.com.cn


A stage photo of From In. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-12-24 16:11:24
<![CDATA[Province aims to become top spot for snow and ice sports]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/25/content_1469461.htm

The 4th Jilin Snow Exposition and the 23rd Changcun Ice and Snow Festival is held on Dec 13. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Northeast China's Jilin province, which enjoys a great abundance in ice and snow every winter, has vowed to use the forthcoming 2022 Winter Olympics to promote itself as a world-class ice and snow tourism destination, according to the region's top official.

"The 2022 Winter Olympics will be held in Beijing, and Jilin is set to become a hub for people to experience the charm of winter sports," said Bayin Chaolu, Party secretary of Jilin province, during the opening ceremony of the fourth Jilin Snow Exposition and the 23rd Changchun Ice and Snow Festival on Dec 13. "The 2022 Winter Olympics will create tremendous business opportunities for Jilin."

Bayin Chaolu said Jilin will deepen cooperation with its counterparts in relevant industries and work in full swing to support the upcoming Winter Olympics.

"Thanks to the Olympics, we believe Jilin's ice and snow industry will achieve fast growth, and Jilin will be a world class ice and snow tourism destination," Baiyin Chaolu said.

Jilin province, known for having some of the country's best powdery snow, the type favored by skiers and snowboarders, has been promoting the development of ice and snow-centered tourism, sports and culture in recent years, as encouraged by the central government. And it has enjoyed a strong momentum of development, according to Bayin Chaolu.

During the 2018-19 snow season, which ran from Nov 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019, Jilin province recorded approximately 84.32 million visits to its tourist attractions, and reported some 169.81 billion yuan ($24.27 billion) of tourism revenue.

The region has many of the best and the largest ski resorts in China including the famous Lake Songhua Resort, Beidahu Ski Resort and Changbai Mountain Wanda International Resort. Songhua has ranked among China's top ski resorts for the past two years since 2017 in terms of visits, according to official statistics. In 2018, the resort welcomed more than 560,000 skiers. Beidahu Ski Resort boasts one of the largest professional ski courses in Asia. All the resorts opened for the 2019-20 snow season in November.

Jilin province has carried out a series of measures to support the upgrading of its ice and snow industry. And it is developing an ice and snow industrial chain to cover expos, sports, culture, trade and manufacturing. The province has also unveiled policies to attract more talented industry professionals, as well as promote smart development, according to local authorities.

Apart from building advanced ski resorts and facilities, the province has implemented a three-year action plan to support the development of the ice and snow equipment manufacturing industry. The region, a traditional manufacturing hubs in China, will partner with national and global leading businesses to develop heavy equipment such as snowplows, snow-making machines, cable cars and ice resurfacing machines. Local companies are also being encouraged to pay greater attention to research and development centered on lightweight snowboards, helmets and ice skates.

The fourth Jilin Snow Exposition, held from Dec 13 to 17, covered 100,000 square meters and attracted 1,256 brands from around the world. During the event, the official mascot of the 2022 Winter Olympics Bing Dwen Dwen-a panda in ice armor, and the mascot of the 2022 Paralympics Shuey Rhon Rhon-a red lantern, were available for purchase, ratcheting up anticipation for the 2022 Winter Games. "I believe Jilin will become one of the largest ski destinations in China after the 2022 Winter Olympics and will lead the country's ski industry development," said Wu Bin, vice-president of the Beijing Ski Association.

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2019-12-25 08:52:41
<![CDATA[Foreign musicians make overtures to China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/25/content_1469454.htm

Singer-songwriter Luke Thompson performs in Shanghai on Dec 8. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Huge market offers 'untapped potential'

Fans welcome Galen Crew, 29, at airports and hotels where he stays, his concerts sell out fast and his followers sing along to the lyrics he writes.

The singer-songwriter-who was born in Ocean City, New Jersey, United States, grew up in Tennessee and now lives in Nashville, the state capital-has accumulated a large fan base in China, as have some of his peers from other countries.

From Nov 28 to Dec 7, Crew played a seven-city Chinese tour, including concerts in Shanghai, Beijing and Chengdu, Sichuan province.

He updated his schedule on his Sina Weibo account, where he interacts with his Chinese fans, who have given him a nickname, chuan zhang, which translates as "captain".

"I have been to all of the cities at least twice now-but this is actually my third time in Guangzhou (Guangdong province), Beijing and Shanghai," Crew said. "The most exciting thing is appearing in city after city and seeing that fans know the words to my songs. When they sing along with me, it is exhilarating."

His interest in music started at an early age, and he wrote his first composition at 11. He has played with various bands since high school, performing on a range of instruments, including acoustic guitar, ukulele, bass guitar and piano. He also produces music for other artists.

Crew describes his music-a combination of pop, electronic and some folk elements-as "dreamy", as he draws a lot of inspiration from stories, both fantasy and real-life.

On Dec 5, one fan, named Rongyan, posted on Crew's music page on NetEase Cloud Music, one of the main online music platforms in China: "It was a touching moment to watch his show in China and hear him speak Chinese. He worked hard to learn to speak Chinese for his fans."

In 2014, Crew began hearing from Chinese fans, who told him his songs were becoming popular in the country.

He said: "I wasn't even sure if it was true, but then some fans sent me a link to a Chinese music platform, where my songs were getting millions of plays. I said: 'Wow!! This is amazing!'"

He then created a profile on Sina Weibo and began communicating with his fans more regularly. Inspired to learn just how much his followers in China were enjoying his songs, he began planning a trip to the country in 2016.

Crew said: "One thing that many fans say to me is that they feel a strong sense of peace and calm when they listen to my songs. Others say that my songs make them feel as if they have suddenly stepped into a joyful dream. It really motivates me to continue writing new songs when I see the uplifting effect the music is having on them."


Galen Crew, who also writes his own songs, toured seven Chinese cities from Nov 28 to Dec 7. [Photo provided to China Daily]

His popularity in China has extended to the US, where he now has a great number of Chinese followers.

"My music is actually much more popular in China than in the US. I have fans in the US and I have toured many states there, but these fans are typically not as passionate about my songs as those from China. However, when people in the US hear about my popularity in China, they are fascinated by this," Crew said.

"My American friends are always asking me about China and about my fans there. I have told many people in the US about the wonderful experiences I've had in China and the interesting things I've learned about Chinese culture. I have fallen in love with the Chinese people. It is very heartwarming for people to hear about this unique international connection we share."

His recent tour, titled Apologue, features 20 songs he released in four separate volumes.

"I wanted the tour to sort of make listeners feel as if they were reading a book of fairy tales as they listened to the songs. This project is a journey of adventure and excitement, but also what it feels like to walk through sadness and hardship," Crew said, adding that he used his own life experiences to craft songs that can relate to everyone. "Ultimately, I want people to feel a sense of hope and peace when they listen to them."

His latest release is I Want You Close Forever. The artwork to promote it was done by a fan in Shanghai named only as May. Crew released the number in China before the rest of the world, saying, "It's almost like a love song from me to the Chinese people."

During his debut tour of China in 2016, he wrote a song titled Fragrance. Crew said he was so inspired by what he was experiencing in the country that "my mind was kind of blown". He had never been to China before, and yet huge numbers of fans were coming to his shows and singing along to all the songs. He even featured the traditional Chinese instrument the erhu in Fragrance, as well as filming the video for it in China.

NetEase Cloud Music, where Crew can see fans' comments and how they react to each song, has helped him reach out to his followers in the country.

"My songs first became popular on NetEase Cloud Music, so I knew I needed to focus on engaging my audience there", he said.

In August 2016, one of Crew's songs, Sleepyhead, received nearly 20,000 comments, later becoming one of his most popular in China.


Crew interacts with his fans in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

One fan who watched Crew's show in Beijing on Dec 2 at Mao Livehouse, commented on the artist's Weibo account the following day: "I discovered Galen through the song Sleepyhead and I enjoyed his music, which is warm and uplifting. His music gives me so much courage to believe that everything will be OK."

Another fan, who wrote to Crew, said: "We are cheered by your musical work. Sometimes life is difficult, but your music is always warm."

Crew wrote Sleepyhead with British songwriter Roger Cook, who is a friend of his. "It was very surprising to me at first when the Chinese responded to this song so much. Now, one of my favorite moments in the show is to perform Sleepyhead, because the Chinese fans sing along to every word."

Meanwhile, New Zealand singer-songwriter Luke Thompson has begun his first tour of China, appearing in Shanghai, Beijing and Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province.

"Before I gave my first show in Shanghai on Dec 8, I thought there would be about 20 people in the audience. But I was surprised to see over 200 show up," Thompson said in an interview before he appeared in Beijing on Sunday.

The self-managed artist has released albums, including To the Common Dark in 2012, Strum Strum in 2015 and Hosts in 2016.

One of his most popular songs among Chinese fans is On a Slow Boat to China. They apparently enjoy the number due to its title, although it refers to something that takes a very long time.

About two years ago, Thompson started to receive emails and messages from Chinese fans, who shared their feelings about his music. With his smooth guitar-driven melodies, he now has more than 30,000 followers on his page on Net-Ease Cloud Music.

"I didn't know much about China, but I was eager to explore it," he said. During his trip to the country, he was drawn to its ancient history and he also bought some traditional musical instruments.

He even wrote a song just after he arrived in Shanghai, titled From Shanghai to Anywhere Else, which voices his feelings about the country.

In 2017, China was a new entrant to the global top 10 music market, and rose to seventh place last year, according to the report by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. The country's music market has enormous untapped potential, with an online user base of 650 million people and a growing number of licensed digital services, according to the federation.

Since its launch in 2013, NetEase Cloud Music has collaborated with more than 200 music companies on legal copyright issues. The music platform now has over 30 million authorized songs, which have attracted about 900 million comments.

Mathew Daniel, vice-president, international, of NetEase Cloud Music, said almost 90 percent of its music is Western, as it represents the largest growth category.


Luke Thompson performs in Shanghai. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"It (the platform) is among the social media available to artists to connect to their fans in China, and those who have invested their time and efforts in cultivating their Chinese fans have definitely benefited. The fans are now eager to familiarize themselves with more music genres that have traditionally been dominated by Western artists, so the opportunity is there for these artists to reciprocate that interest via social media."

With the daily number of user-generated playlists standing at nearly 1 million, comments at 1.6 million, and shares at more than 10 million, users spend an average of at least 1.5 hours a day on the service.

With Chinese music fans embracing a variety of genres, international artists such as Dutch disc jockeys R3HAB and W&W have built a strong profile in the country in collaboration with Net-Ease Cloud Music.

Other artists, including singer-songwriters Kim Taylor from the US and J.Fla from South Korea, have gained more popularity in China than at home.

Daniel said: "While the rest of the music world was evolving in one direction, China's music market was moving in a different direction and at a different pace.

"But with the internet, everything rushes into China from the rest of the world, but often without context or chronology. So, part of the challenge for international artists and potential fans is to try to find a match musically, especially when the potential audience is not aware of the background of the music, genre or artists. As such, social media has taken on a more important role in providing more musical context."

In addition to online music platforms, the Chinese record company Modern Sky, one of the largest indie labels, also helps bring foreign artists to the country. In 2006, it launched its first overseas office in New York, while in 2017, it opened Modern Sky UK in Liverpool, northern England.

The overseas offices sign local bands as well as introducing them to Chinese fans via social media and the Strawberry Music Festival, an annual outdoor event held in a number of Chinese cities.

The label, launched in 1997 by rocker Shen Lihui, has held sold-out concerts for international acts, including Australian singer-songwriter Lenka Kripac and Brett Anderson from the British rock band Suede.

It has signed nearly 100 Western bands and singer-songwriters, and in December last year launched the Modern Sky International Artist Booking Agency, which represents 17 international acts, including Wednesday Campanella, a Japanese group, and the British four-piece alternative rock band Wolf Alice.

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2019-12-25 08:08:46
<![CDATA[World royal treasures come to Shenzhen]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/24/content_1469339.htm

A starfish-shaped brooch is among the exhibits. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

An exhibition titled "Awaken: Royal Jewellery Arts from Renaissance to the 20th Century" opened at the Shenzhen Museum of Contemporary Art and Urban Planning in Shenzhen, South China's Guangdong province, on Sunday.

More than 160 pieces of royal treasures collected from 20 countries and regions and spanning four centuries are on display. The exhibits cover necklaces, pendants, pocket watches, crowns, snuff bottles and other luxury items from Europe, as well as turquoise bottles and gold bracelets from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). Among them over 100 treasures are on display for the first time.

Besides, people can participate in various cultural activities, such as workshop, concert, salon and parent-child activities during the exhibition.

The exhibition will run through March 1, 2020.

People view exhibits during the exhibition "Awaken: Royal Jewellery Arts from Renaissance to the 20th Century" in Shenzhen, South China's Guangdong province. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A gold leaf is among the exhibits. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A gold bracelet is among the exhibits. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Royal snuff bottles are among the exhibits. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A royal crown is among the exhibits. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-12-24 15:41:45
<![CDATA[Poem read: Winter solstice maintains its glow]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/22/content_1468871.htm

Winter solstice, which falls on Dec 22 this year, is the day when the sun hits the Tropic of Cancer. On this day, the sun directly crosses the Tropic of Capricorn and the northern hemisphere has the shortest day and the longest night.

There was an old saying that went in ancient China, "winter solstice is as significant as the new year". Although records of people celebrating winter solstice date back to the Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 220), celebrations really took off during the Tang (618-907) and Song (960-1279) dynasties. On this day, the imperial court had a holiday and rested. Some folks also maintained customs such as ancestor worship and family reunion. Therefore, winter solstice is also known as the "small New Year".

The poem Winter Solstice (translated by Xu Yuanchong) was written the day before winter solstice by Du Fu, a poet of Tang Dynasty. The poem says that time flies and the winter comes. Although it is freezing, the beautiful scenery into sight is embracing the next coming spring.

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2019-12-22 07:00:00
<![CDATA[China Daily cooks up delicious Winter Solstice delicacies]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/22/content_1468859.htm

Winter Solstice (Chinese: 冬至), the 22nd solar term of the year, is considered even more important than Spring Festival in some parts of China. Traditionally, people in the north made dumplings to mark the occasion, while in southern Chinese cities, cuisine tended to vary significantly.

Watch China Daily reporters Jason and Jean as they show you how to make two iconic delicacies for the Winter Solstice –?enjoy!

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2019-12-22 08:00:00
<![CDATA['Dream of the Red Chamber' exhibition offers encyclopedic view]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/23/content_1469052.htm

A Qing Dynasty copy of Dream of the Red Chamber. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Of all the classic Chinese literature, Dream of the Red Chamber is undoubtedly one of the most popular and adapted works. It has been adapted into folk ballads, local operas, movies, TV dramas and even modern dance.

At A Literary Peak of Eternity, an exhibition now on at the National Museum of China through March 17, the audience can experience the eternal charm of this 18th-century master piece by viewing 36 different adaptations in various forms of art.

Also on show are nearly 600 artifacts, paintings, documents and texts, as well as products and designs relevant to the novel, offering visitors an encyclopedic view of how Dream of the Red Chamber has continued to inspire people and the social context it was set against.


A Qing Dynasty painting inspired by Dream of the Red Chamber on show at A Literary Peak of Eternity. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Qing Dynasty painting album inspired by Dream of the Red Chamber on show. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Deng Jie, who portrays Wang Xifeng in the 1987 TV series Dream of the Red Chamber, views exhibits at the show.  [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Deng Jie, who portrays Wang Xifeng in the 1987 TV series Dream of the Red Chamber, views exhibits at the show.  [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]  

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2019-12-23 10:41:57
<![CDATA[Qatar Airways launches new 'Quisine' on China flights]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/23/content_1469044.htm

Qatar Airways elevated the economy class experience with 'Quisine' dining service aboard flights to and from China. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Qatar Airways elevated the economy class experience with the launch of its new 'Quisine' dining service aboard flights to and from China.

'Quisine' is now available on flights from all seven China destinations, namely Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chengdu, Hangzhou, Chongqing and Hong Kong to its Middle East hub in Doha.

The localized menus also introduce signature Chinese main course dishes such as Wuxi chicken with egg fried rice, wok-fried noodles with sweet and sour tofu, stir-fried herfan noodles with beef, and fried chicken with ginger garlic sauce. Chengdu and Chongqing flights additionally include traditional Sichuan specialties like mapo tofu.

As part of Qatar Airways' commitment to the environment, the presentation of 'Quisine' also focuses on reducing single-use plastics, with an 80 percent increase in recyclable and biodegradable products.

Chefs prepare 'Quisine' on flight. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"Qatar Airways is thrilled to introduce a whole new on-board dining experience that will push the boundaries of economy travel for our esteemed passengers. Every new concept was designed and produced with the highest attention to taste, seasonality, detail and quality, to meet the exacting standards of our passengers," said Qatar Airways' North Asia Vice-President Joshua Law.

According to him, Qatar Airways is collaborating closely with local farms and suppliers to produce products for our specific needs, promoting a "farm-to-table" approach.

"Our in-flight dining menus are designed to align with the four seasons, better incorporating the use of locally-grown produce and tapping into authentic foods of local provenance delivering the very highest international standards," Law add.

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2019-12-23 10:08:33
<![CDATA[Jackie Chan reveals 'near-death' stunt in upcoming film 'Vanguard']]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/23/content_1469046.htm

Jackie Chan, 65, still performs death-defying stunts in his new movie. [Photo provided to China Daily]

During a promotional event for the upcoming film Vanguard, the iconic action star Jackie Chan revealed that he was trapped underwater in a chase scene featuring his character steering an amphibious motorcycle.

He recalled that the craft capsized in turbulent flow, trapping him under the water and making it hard for him to be seen by the on-set crew.

"Jackie was suddenly missing. I was extremely scared. Two rescue speedboats were immediately dispatched to launch a search. Luckily, we soon pulled him out of the water. At that every moment, I couldn't hold my tears," recalls director Stanley Tong.

As the ninth feature to reunite Chan and Tong, who have collaborated for over 30 years, the new movie tells the story of Vanguard, a fictional international security company which dispatches its elites to protect a Chinese businessman and his daughter, who have become targets of the world's deadliest mercenary organization.

The film will open across China on the first day of the forthcoming Spring Festival, which will fall on Jan 25, 2020.

With a stellar cast, the film will also feature actors Yang Yang and Ai Lun, actresses Miya Muqi and Xu Ruohan, as well as singer and actor Zhu Zhengting.


Yang Yang stars in Vanguard.[Photo provided to China Daily]


Director Stanley Tong and Jackie Chan, who have cooperated for around 30 years, reveal behind-the-scene stories of Vanguard. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Crew and cast of Vanguard gather in the Beijing promotional event on Dec 18. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-12-23 10:13:47
<![CDATA[Sweet smell of the season]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/21/content_1468715.htm

Roasted chestnuts are a common street food in China during fall and winter, where they are sold outdoors in many towns and at street intersections. [Photo provided to China Daily]

As a cold-weather comfort food, chestnuts are a healthy winter staple that can be cooked in a variety of ways.

Roasted chestnuts are cold weather comfort food. On the streets of Beijing, tiny hole-in-the-wall shops with big black drum roasters or huge iron woks are once again sending out the tempting aroma of caramelized chestnuts.

They are seasonal vendors, because for the rest of the year, the drums are silent and the woks cold and the shopkeepers sell dried fruits, melon seeds and sweet potato chips instead. Only after the autumn harvests does the roasting begin.

If you take an excursion out to the Great Wall at Mutianyu, you will see the native chestnut trees below as the cable cars take you to the hilltop. Tourists visiting the Ming Tombs, too, may also rest unaware beneath ancient chestnut trees.

But they are there, distinguished by their dark green ovate leaves with serrated edges, or their skinny catkins when it's flowering season. The easiest time to identify chestnuts is when the fruits ripen and fall to the ground.

The reddish brown nuts, two to three to a thorny case, will peek through an extremely prickly shell called the burr.

In my old campus grounds, there were plenty of stately trees in the park and Asian students used to gather fallen fruits, stamping on the burrs to release the nuts to save fingers from being pricked. The American chestnuts are much larger and need to be sun-dried for a bit to sweeten them. Otherwise they would just taste floury.


Roasted chestnuts are a common street food in China during fall and winter, where they are sold outdoors in many towns and at street intersections. [Photo provided to China Daily]

We did not have the equipment to roast them, so we simply cranked up the oven and baked them. I even experimented with grinding the nuts into powder and making bread and chestnut cookies, which worked pretty well.

Funnily enough, no one else bothered to pick the chestnuts except the squirrels, and we were left to enjoy the free bounty.

In China, not a nut goes to waste. Even wild chestnut trees are carefully monitored and when the burrs fall, they are hastily foraged.

The best chestnuts are from Liangxiang in Fangshan, a southwestern Beijing suburb. Liangxiang chestnuts have become a known brand sold all over the country and are even exported.

Tianjin also produces chestnuts and the farmers there have carefully packaged their nuts in ready-to-eat vacuum packs that are sold in the city's souvenir shops. You can also see these at airport duty free shops all over China.

But ask Beijing locals and they will swear by the chestnuts from Huairou, an outskirt county that is well known for its trout farms and farmers' restaurants. Huairou chestnuts are smaller, but to all accounts, the sweetest.

Chestnuts are grown all over China, and the cultivars are all slightly different. Some are suitable for roasting, others are sold freshly shucked at markets for the cooking pot, and still others are harvested, skinned and dried to be sold all year round. The better quality chestnuts are from Shandong and Fujian.


Roasted chestnuts are a common street food in China during fall and winter, where they are sold outdoors in many towns and at street intersections. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Chinese chestnuts are winter snacks. Whole nuts are snipped at the bottom end to prevent them exploding during cooking and then roasted in a mixture of sand and sugar. They are sifted clean before being sold but are still characterized by the slightly gritty sticky shells. These sweet chestnuts, a deep chocolate brown and glistening with sugar glaze, are a real treat.

They used to be hand fried in huge iron woks, with the vendors perspiring over the hot sand mixture, in spite of the winter chill. The sand helps to increase the heat needed to pop the nuts open.

These days, chestnuts are mostly roasted in automated steel drums that rotate, rustling noisily at each turn.

Holding a bag of hot chestnuts warms both hands and heart. And, because of the high carbohydrate content, the nuts also provide heat to the body.

As the nuts cool quickly in the chilly temperatures of winter, they become easier to crack and peel, their dark brown skin coming away from the creamy yellow flesh like paper.

Chestnuts are also used for cooking.

They are one of the ingredients for the classic Eight Treasures Duck, together with lotus seeds, shiitake mushrooms, Chinese sausages, leeks, scallions, pine nuts and sticky rice. You can say this is the Chinese equivalent of stuffed turkey.

Chinese chefs go one better. The duck is carefully boned before the filling is stuffed into the bird, steamed and then flash fried to crisp the skin before serving. Sometimes, the duck is tied at the neck and at the waist to shape it into a bottle gourd, or hulu, a symbol of good fortune and longevity.

Another classic dish is braised chicken and chestnuts in an onion gravy. It is an extremely popular home-cooked dish when fresh chestnuts are in season.

Unlike the French, the Chinese are traditionally less likely to use chestnuts in patisserie, but the new coffee clubs and cake houses in the cities are now pushing out a popular cake topped with candied chestnut puree similar to marron glacé. This pastry first originated in Hong Kong and was in turn inspired by the classic French Mont Blanc.

Chestnuts are also dried. The dehydrated nuts meant chefs could use the nuts all year round, simply soaking them in water before cooking. Dried chestnuts are sold in Chinatowns all over the world.

During the fifth lunar month when rice dumplings are prepared for the Dragon Boat Festival, dried chestnuts fly off the shelves. Every savory dumpling will always need one or two chestnuts to complete the filling.

Like most Chinese ingredients, chestnuts are valued for their medicinal properties.

Traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions use chestnuts for stomach ulcers and to whet appetites. They are believed to be a "yang" food and therefore good for virility. Taken in moderation, they aid blood flow and increase "qi" in the body.

It is also food for the ladies, having the ability to combat anemia and improve complexions.

That's very comforting to know, and for once I'm sure, most will gladly take the prescriptions and enjoy them too.

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2019-12-21 09:25:00
<![CDATA[Yearender: Top 10 exhibitions in China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/19/content_1468310.htm Editor's note:

Art opens hearts, nourishes souls and kindles imaginations; also, art plays a key role in consolidating national identity and promoting mutual understanding between civilizations as well.

As 2019 nears the end and we're to say hello to a brand-new year, China Daily invites you to look back at 10 of the most eye-catching exhibitions held around the country in the passing year.

Did you visit some of them? Please share with us the memories of your trips in the comment section!

The central part of a triptych painting by Chinese artist Zhou Zongkai, titled A Praise of Sanjiangyuan, recently displayed at the National Art Museum of China in Beijing. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

1. Great Journey, Splendid View: Art exhibition celebrates New China's 70th birthday

National Art Museum of China in Beijing (Sept 26-Nov 2)

Great Journey, Splendid View, an art exhibition dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the People's Republic of China, was held at the National Art Museum of China in Beijing.

Featuring 480 selected works of ink paintings, oil works, sculptures, prints, watercolors, traditional Chinese folk art and posters, mostly on loan from over 20 Chinese art museums, the grand exhibition allowed visitors to review the accomplishments of New China through the evolution of Chinese art over the past seven decades.

Many of China's iconic artworks created since 1949 were put on show in one place and among them were Li Hua's 1935 woodblock print Roar, China, Pan He's 1957 bronze sculpture Hard Times, Luo Zhongli's 1980 oil painting Father, and Shen Jiawei's oil work Red Star Over China.

Click here to learn more.


Visitors view The Splendor of Asia: An Exhibition of Asian Civilizations at the National Museum of China in Beijing on May 13, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong /China Daily]

2. The Splendor of Asia: An Exhibition of Asian Civilizations

National Museum of China in Beijing (May 13-Aug 11)

To grace and spice up the Conference on Dialogue of Asian Civilizations that opened on May 15, The Splendor of Asia: An Exhibition of Asian Civilizations revealed how splendid Asian cultures are, mesmerizing visitors with a total of 451 cultural relics from 49 countries in Asia. 

"Such a large number of top-level exhibits and participating countries have never been seen before in one exhibition in China," said Guan Qiang, deputy director of the National Cultural Heritage Administration. 

Click here to learn more. 


The "king of cong", a 5,300-year jade article from Liangzhu Culture, is a major highlight of the exhibition Liangzhu and Ancient China: A 5,000-year Civilization Demonstrated by Jade. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

3. Liangzhu and Ancient China: A 5,000-year Civilization Demonstrated by Jade

The Palace Museum in Beijing (July 16-Oct 20)

On July 6, 2019, the world turned its attention to the Archaeological Ruins of Liangzhu City in Hangzhou as on this day, the ruins dating back 5,000 years were inscribed onto the UNESCO Heritage list.

The Liangzhu ruins are widely considered a solid testament to the Chinese civilization with a history stretching back five millennia.

Just 10 days later, the Palace Museum in Beijing mounted the exhibition Liangzhu and Ancient China, bringing together nearly 260 objects gathered from 17 museums and research institutes nationwide, just in time to feed public curiosity and unveil the charm of this realm of deities and kings.

Click here to learn more.


 

Posters for the two exhibitions The Shape of Time and Observations, held at the West Bund Museum in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chiadaily.com.cn]

4. Masterworks from the Collections of the Centre Pompidou

The West Bund Museum in Shanghai

The Shape of Time (Nov 8, 2019 - May 9, 2021)

Observations (Nov 8-Mar 29, 2020)

Under the framework of the Centre Pompidou x West Bund Museum Project, a high-level cultural exchange between China and France that goes on from this year to 2024, the newly inaugurated Shanghai museum is staging exhibitions, both featuring selected artworks from the collections of the Centre Pompidou.

Running until May 9, 2021, the long-term exhibition The Shape of Time, featuring more than 100 artworks from the Centre Pompidou, briefs the audience on the history and stories behind the artworks, including those by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro and Marcel Duchamp. Another exhibition Observations, running until March 29, 2020, presents 16 signature works by 15 artists, highlights from the Centre Pompidou New Media Collection to sketch out the worldwide development of new media art.

In five years, Centre Pompidou will host three exhibitions, each lasting at least 18 months, at the West Bund Museum, along with other 10 exhibitions each lasting at least six months. Meanwhile, Centre Pompidou in Paris will host three major exhibitions on China's contemporary art.

Click here to learn more.


A view of Pioneering: Chinese Artists Abroad in France and Modern Chinese Art (1911-1949), held at the CAFA Art Museum in Beijing. [Photo provided to chiadaily.com.cn]

5. Pioneering: Chinese Artists Abroad in France and Modern Chinese Art (1911-1949)

CAFA Art Museum in Beijing (Jan 1 - Mar 3)

Long Museum at the West Bund in Shanghai (Mar 16 - Jun 9)

Long Museum in Chongqing (June 18 - Sept 1)

Sponsored by the Central Academy of Fine Arts and co-organized by the CAFA Art Museum and Long Museum, the grand exhibition, a key project of the National Art Fund, encompasses over 200 signature works from more than 40 Chinese artists who had studied in France in the first half of the 20th century.

Among the featured artists are Xu Beihong (1895-1953), Wu Zuoren (1908-97), Wu Dayu (1903-1988), Liu Haisu (1896-1994) and Zao Wou-ki (1921-2013), each having had a strong impact on the thoughts, trends and education modes of modern China art, and even on the lifestyles of Chinese people.

The exhibition "aims to highlight the great endeavors these pioneering artists had made and remarkable achievements they had achieved to transform traditional Chinese art", said Hong Mei, the curator for the show. "It also offers rich inspiration for Chinese artists today who are well aware of international art trends and fully exposed to infinite possibilities in the age of cutting-edge technologies."


The photo on the left is a piece of oracle bone written with jiaguwen, the earliest known form of Chinese writing that dates back 3,000 years, while the photo on the right is a jiaguwen meme, meaning "add oil". [Photo/Xinhua]

6. Grand showcase of oracle bone scripts

The National Museum of China (Oct 22-Dec 22)

Jiaguwen, or the oracle bone inscriptions, are the earliest known form of Chinese writing that dates back 3,000 years.

Ancient as the character is, it has gained traction among Chinese netizens thanks to a bunch of colorful, creative Jiaguwen memes that are widely used on China's largest social media platform WeChat.

As 2019 marks the 120th anniversary of the discovery of Jiaguwen in Central China's Anyang city, the Beijing museum put together more than 190 oracle bones, a raft of archaic bronze artifacts, pottery works, and carved jade pieces, showcasing the history of the Shang (c.16th century-11th century BC) and Zhou (c.11th century-256 BC) dynasties.

Click here to learn more:


Pablo Picasso’s Self-portrait, 81 x 60 cm, oil on canvas, created in Paris at the end of 1901. [Photo/Courtesy of Museé national Picasso-Paris and Succession Picasso 2019]

7. Picasso: Birth of a Genius 

UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing (June 15-Sep 1)

In this summer, few in the Chinese capital could avoid the Picasso craze that was felt nearly everywhere, online and offline, thanks to the blockbuster UCCA show, Picasso: Birth of a Genius

Official UCCA data reveals that about 350,000 people visited the show over its 80-day duration, making it one of the most sought-after events on the art calendar in the country in 2019.

The Beijing exhibition chronicled the first three decades of Picasso's career, with 103 works ?34 paintings, 14 sculptures and 55 works on paper, from the collection of the Picasso-Paris National Museum tracing his development from childhood.


A visitor to the exhibition Everlasting Like the Heavens: The cultures and arts of the Zhou, Qin, Han and Tang views the bronzewares belonging to the Zhou Dynasties (c.11th century-256 BC) on Dec 7, 2019 at the Tsinghua Art Museum in Beijing. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]

8. Everlasting Like the Heavens: The cultures and arts of the Zhou, Qin, Han and Tang

Tsinghua University Art Museum (Sep 10-Dec 17)

The past three months have seen the Tsinghua University Art Museum become a hot tourist destination in the Chinese capital as its special exhibition Everlasting Like the Heavens has attracted people from far and wide to view and marvel at the heart of ancient Chinese civilization. 

Themed after "everlasting like the heavens", an auspicious Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 220) phrase, the show teamed up more than 300 top-quality artifacts on loan from a bevy of museums in Northwest China's Shaanxi province. Among them, 189 showpieces have been recognized as grade-one, or the highest-level cultural relics. 

On view were bronzewares, jade pieces and paintings that reflect the essence of the ancient Zhou (c.11th century-256 BC), Qin (221-206 BC), Han and Tang (AD 618-907) dynasties. 

Click here to learn more. 


A viewer stops to look at one of Xu Beihong’s ink depictions of animals at the opening of the exhibition of modern Chinese ink art on Nov 26, 2019, at the Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, capital of East China’s Jiangsu province. [Photo/IC]

9. Grand show of eight modern Chinese ink art masters 

Nanjing Museum (Nov 27-Feb 28, 2020)

The Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, kicked off a grand exhibition of modern Chinese ink art in late November. First of its kind in terms of scope, the exhibition presents 158 signature works by eight of the most influential ink painting masters of modern China, including Qi Baishi (1864-1957), Pan Tianshou (1897-1971) and Huang Binhong (1865-1955). 

"Their works in museum collections are officially rated as national treasures, and their painting styles and artistic thoughts have had a far-reaching impact on younger generations of Chinese ink painters," said Pang Ou, curator of the exhibition, art historian and art connoisseur with the Nanjing Museum. "Their works on the market at home and abroad are the Holy Grails at major auctions."


A visitor gazes at a returned cultural relic on Sept 17, 2019 at the National Museum of China in Beijing. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

10. Grand show of New China's retrieved relics 

National Museum of China (Sep 17-Nov 27)

To showcase China's arduous yet fruitful journey of cultural relic retrieval over the last 70 years, a monumental exhibition featuring more than 600 valuable cultural relics was held at the National Museum of China, offering the public a rare chance to appreciate treasures that define our national identity. 

Divided into four sections, the exhibition unfolds 25 stories of how the relics and artifacts were brought home.

Since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, more than 150,000 Chinese cultural relics have returned from overseas in around 300 batches through law enforcement cooperation, lawsuits, negotiations and donations, according to Liu Yuzhu, head of the National Cultural Heritage Administration.

Yang Xiaoyu contributed to the story.

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2019-12-19 09:20:19
<![CDATA[Nurturing a spiritual connection]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/19/content_1468308.htm

An 18th-century gold-gilt red brass statue inlaid with pearls and turquoise gems portraying Maitreya, or the "future Buddha", from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Shigatse, Tibet autonomous region, goes on display at an exhibition in Beijing.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Centuries of exchanges between the Panchen Lama and the central government are highlighted in a new Palace Museum exhibition, Wang Kaihao reports.

They may be nearly 4,000 kilometers apart, yet the Forbidden City and the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery are two key landmarks that have enjoyed historically close connections.

The two places, while separated by a vast distance, jointly tell the centuries-old story of the close connections between the Chinese central government and Tibet.

The Fortune and Longevity of Sumeru: An Encounter Between the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery and the Palace Museum, an exhibition at the Palace Museum which opened to the public on Dec 10, introduces people to the splendid fine arts and rich cultural artifacts from the monastery.

Just as the Forbidden City was China's imperial palace from 1420 to 1911, the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Shigatse, Tibet autonomous region, was constructed in the 15th century and is the seat of the Panchen Lama, a Tibetan spiritual leader.

The exhibition held in the Meridian Gate Galleries of the Palace Museum showcases 280 cultural relics, 77 of which come from the monastery while the rest are curated from the permanent collection of the museum. It will run through February.


An ongoing exhibition in Beijing features more than 200 artifacts including Buddha statues, thangka paintings and other items from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery and the Palace Museum.[Photo provided to China Daily]

According to Wang Xudong, director of the Palace Museum, it is the first time since the Forbidden City became a public museum in 1925 that it has showcased cultural relics pertaining to the Panchen Lama.

"It's also the first time these relics from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery have left the site to be shown to the public," Wang says.

"We also have more than 10 Buddhist temples in the Forbidden City," he says. "And tens of thousands of Tibetan Buddhist statues and other related religious artifacts are housed in our museum."

Some of these statues were made by the imperial household's workshops of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), but many were precious artifacts that were paid as tributes by the Tibetan and Mongolian ethnic groups.


A statue portrays the Buddhist guru Tsongkhapa, which was made in a workshop at the Forbidden City in 1781.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"They are symbols of communication among different ethnic groups," Wang says.

Tibetan Buddhism has a diversity of sects, one of which is the dominant Gelug school. It was founded by guru Tsongkhapa Lobzang Drakpa (1357-1419). Tashi Lhunpo Monastery was founded in 1447 by Gedun Drupa, an eminent disciple of Tsongkhapa. As such, it is revered as one of the most important sites of not only the Gelug school, but also to Tibetan Buddhism.

In 1713, Emperor Kangxi, whose reign lasted from 1662 to 1722, appointed the fifth Panchen Lama the bestowed title of "Panchen Erdeni" upon him and gave him gold plates and a gold seal to symbolize official approval from the imperial court of the Qing Dynasty.

"It then became a routine that each Panchen Lama had to be confirmed by the central government," says Luo Wenhua, a researcher at the Palace Museum and curator of the exhibition.

He explains that the gold plates and gold seal were chosen for the exhibition for their extraordinary historical significance.


An ongoing exhibition in Beijing features more than 200 artifacts including Buddha statues, thangka paintings and other items from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery and the Palace Museum.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"There was a social upheaval in the country from the latter half of the 17th century to the first half of 18th century," Luo says. "The Qing Dynasty endured the long process of uniting the country, and several Panchen Lamas made great contributions in their roles as religious leaders in maintaining the stability of Tibet and rule of a Qing central government in the region."

Speaking of other items with historical significance, Luo also highlighted the selection of the tooth of an unidentified Panchen Lama for the exhibition. It was worshipped as a holy item in the Forbidden City to reflect the emotional ties between the two seats of power. An ivory Buddha, which was worshipped by the Panchen Lamas, was also donated to the Qing royal court.

Exchanges between the two locations were frequent, as Luo points out. Many precious artifacts were taken from Shigatse to Beijing, and vice versa.

In 1780, the 6th Panchen Lama even led an entourage of 3,000 people to Beijing to celebrate the birthday of Emperor Qianlong (1711-99). The delighted emperor bestowed abundant gifts on the traveling party in thanks. A section of the exhibition is specifically set up to reflect this monumental visit.


A seal bestowed on the 5th Panchen Lama by Emperor Kangxi in 1713.[Photo provided to China Daily]

For example, a huge portrait of the then Panchen Lama, which was gifted to the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery at the time, has been worshipped there until its recent return to Beijing to be part of this temporary exhibition.

Exquisite Buddhist images and thangka-Tibetan Buddhist paintings on silk or woolen scarves-are also highlights for visitors looking to enjoy breathtaking artworks.

"The monastery is also an important locus for art and culture as its collection contains a great number of works of ancient art from across the Himalayas," Luo says.

He adds that a large number of bronze Buddha statues were produced in an affiliated workshop at the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery, many of which were influenced by Nepalese and ancient Indian styles. The monastery has also been a major hub for thangka painting since the 15th century.

"These exquisite pieces of craftsmanship once had significant influence on the creation of Buddhist imagery and statues produced by the imperial household's workshops during the Qianlong period," Luo says.

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2019-12-19 09:02:13
<![CDATA[Year-ender: 10 Chinese artworks fetching over 100m yuan in 2019]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/18/content_1468306.htm

Zhao Mengfu's Letters goes on auction at China Guardian in Beijing on Nov 19. [Photo/cguardian.com]

Editor's note:

The high prices of auction items have always been very eye-catching, because they reflect to some extent the development trend of art market of that year.

The report Art Investment and the Chinese High Net Worth 2019 from Hurun Research Institute, a wealth research firm that focuses on China, and Art Market Monitor of Artron, said the three major art auction markets in 2018 were the United States, China and the United Kingdom, with a total share of more than 80 percent. Among them, the United States was the biggest market, accounting for 40 percent; China came second with 29 percent market share, and the United Kingdom third, accounting for 18 percent.

Chinese artworks first broke through the 100 million yuan mark in 2009. Now 10 years later, the turnover rate of 100 million yuan items has slowed down after the peak in 2017.

Nevertheless, collectors had expectations from the market, because in 2019, four pieces of Chinese art were sold for more than 200 million yuan, which means that the art market has started to knock on the door of "200 million yuan era", sending out some good signals for the market.

Here are 10 Chinese artworks that sold for more than 100 million yuan in 2019.


Zhao Mengfu's Letters. [Photo/cguardian.com]

1, Zhao Mengfu's Letters
Price realized: 267.4 million yuan ($38.2 million)
Auction House: China Guardian
Category: Classical Chinese Painting and Calligraphy


Li Keran's Long March. [Photo/ polypm.com.cn]

2, Li Keran's Long March
Price realized: 207 million yuan ($29.6 million)
Auction House: Beijing Poly International Auction
Category: Modern Chinese Painting


Pan Tianshou's Pine after Rain. [Photo/cguardian.com]

3, Pan Tianshou's Pine after Rain
Price realized: 205.9 million yuan ($29.4 million)
Auction House: China Guardian
Category: Modern Chinese Painting


A yellow enamel bottle with a knot and patterns from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). [Photo/ artron.net]

4, A yellow enamel bottle with a knot and patterns from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Price realized: HK$ 207.1 million ($26.6 million)
Auction House: Sotheby's Hong Kong
Category: Porcelain


Sanyu's Nu. [Photo/sothebys.com]

5, Sanyu's Nu
Price realized: HK$ 198 million ($29.4 million)
Auction House: Sotheby's Hong Kong
Category: 20th Century & Contemporary Art


Zao Wou-Ki's Triptyque 1987-1988. [Photo/christies.com]

6, Zao Wou-Ki's Triptyque 1987-1988
Price realized: HK$ 178 million ($22.9 million)
Auction House: CHRISTIE'S Hong Kong
Category: 20th Century & Contemporary Art


A globular vase with a cylindrical neck and dragon patterns from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). [Photo/polypm.com.cn]

7, A globular vase with a cylindrical neck and dragon patterns from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)
Price realized: 147.2 million yuan ($21 million)
Auction House: Beijing Poly International Auction
Category: Porcelain


Li Keran's Manchurian Mountains. [Photo/sothebys.com]

8, Li Keran's Manchurian Mountains
Price realized: HK$ 162.7 million ($20.9 million)
Auction House: Sotheby's Hong Kong
Category: Modern Chinese Painting


Wang Meng's Calligraphy. [Photo/polypm.com.cn]

9, Wang Meng's Calligraphy
Price realized: 146.1 million yuan ($20.8 million)
Auction House: Beijing Poly International Auction
Category: Classical Chinese Painting and Calligraphy


Wu Guanzhong's Lion Grove Garden. [Photo/cguardian.com]

10, Wu Guanzhong's Lion Grove Garden
Price realized: 143.8 million yuan ($20.5 million)
Auction House: China Guardian
Category: Modern Chinese Painting

]]>
2019-12-18 11:22:30
<![CDATA[Tibetans celebrate Fairy Festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/13/content_1468304.htm

Tibetan people celebrated their "Fairy Festival" on December 12, 2019 in Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region. The Fairy Festival falls on October 15 every year according to the Tibetan calendar and involves various kinds of religious activities. [Photo/China News Service]


Tibetan people celebrated their "Fairy Festival" on December 12, 2019 in Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region. The Fairy Festival falls on October 15 every year according to the Tibetan calendar and involves various kinds of religious activities. [Photo/China News Service]


Tibetan people celebrated their "Fairy Festival" on December 12, 2019 in Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region. The Fairy Festival falls on October 15 every year according to the Tibetan calendar and involves various kinds of religious activities. [Photo/China News Service]


Tibetan people celebrated their "Fairy Festival" on December 12, 2019 in Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region. The Fairy Festival falls on October 15 every year according to the Tibetan calendar and involves various kinds of religious activities. [Photo/China News Service]


Tibetan people celebrated their "Fairy Festival" on December 12, 2019 in Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region. The Fairy Festival falls on October 15 every year according to the Tibetan calendar and involves various kinds of religious activities. [Photo/China News Service]


Tibetan people celebrated their "Fairy Festival" on December 12, 2019 in Southwest China's Tibet autonomous region. The Fairy Festival falls on October 15 every year according to the Tibetan calendar and involves various kinds of religious activities. [Photo/China News Service]

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2019-12-13 10:29:35
<![CDATA[1,500-year-old tomb murals still look so alive]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/13/content_1468302.htm

Some murals from three tombs dating back to the Northern Dynasties (386-581) are exhibited at Shanxi Museum in Taiyuan, capital of North China's Shanxi province, featuring illustrations of hunting activities as well as gods and spirits. Experts say the portrayal of a grand wooden building is the finest of all such depictions they have ever found in tombs from the late Northern Dynasties. The exhibition will last for three months. [Photo/China News Service]


Some murals from three tombs dating back to the Northern Dynasties (386-581) are exhibited at Shanxi Museum in Taiyuan, capital of North China's Shanxi province, featuring illustrations of hunting activities as well as gods and spirits. Experts say the portrayal of a grand wooden building is the finest of all such depictions they have ever found in tombs from the late Northern Dynasties. The exhibition will last for three months. [Photo/China News Service]


Some murals from three tombs dating back to the Northern Dynasties (386-581) are exhibited at Shanxi Museum in Taiyuan, capital of North China's Shanxi province, featuring illustrations of hunting activities as well as gods and spirits. Experts say the portrayal of a grand wooden building is the finest of all such depictions they have ever found in tombs from the late Northern Dynasties. The exhibition will last for three months. [Photo/China News Service]


Some murals from three tombs dating back to the Northern Dynasties (386-581) are exhibited at Shanxi Museum in Taiyuan, capital of North China's Shanxi province, featuring illustrations of hunting activities as well as gods and spirits. Experts say the portrayal of a grand wooden building is the finest of all such depictions they have ever found in tombs from the late Northern Dynasties. The exhibition will last for three months. [Photo/China News Service]

]]>
2019-12-13 10:08:56
<![CDATA[Tale of Chinese beauty retold in maestro's high-tech show]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/18/content_1468117.htm

Those who are not particularly in love with Chinese history may not be familiar with Xi Shi, one of the great legendary beauties of China who is said to have lived around 500 BC and helped overthrow a kingdom.

But soon they will be, as the world stage maestro Franco Dragone has incorporated the Xi Shi story in his new show to be premiered on Dec 22 in Wuxi, a historical city by Taihu Lake in East China.

The Taihu Show, or Splendor as it is otherwise called, is hailed as a first step for Dragone's new creation concept. "This is really one of the first shows I would call a Dragone musical," said Director of Creation Damien Long, who has worked with Dragone for 15 years and contributed to a number of pieces such as La Perle, Land of Legends, The Dai Show and The Han Show.

"Typically, our shows are stories told through emotion and the audience has a moment when they can decide what the story means for them. This show is really a story-driven show that we've adapted into more of a musical style piece," said Long.

Damien Long, director of creation of The Taihu Show, speaks about the creation of the show at the Taihu Show Theater in Wuxi , Dec 13, 2019. [Photo by Liu Yi'an/chinadaily.com.cn]

Phenix Lin, action director, said that The Taihu Show embodies a great fusion of body languages including martial arts and modern dance to help with the development of characters, revealing their inner strength.

The addition of universal comedy elements into the performance gives the show a fresher, more modern interpretation, said Role Director Wayne Wilson.

When asked about his favorite character in the show, Wilson said that to his surprise it's Xi Shi, as he was unaware of the traditional story prior to the project. "To see the character (Xi Shi) go from a very soft, naive, young lady in her journey to a strong, independent hero has been really satisfying to watch," he said.


A rehearsal scene of The Taihu Show [Photo provided by Sunac Resort]

The tale of Xi Shi incorporates many aspects of traditional Chinese culture in its characters, customs and locations. "Everything that we've built here has inspiration from something that is local…We really want to make sure we capture what are the key moments of the story," said Long.

He observed that in any culture, younger generation are losing the connection with some of the more historical things, partly due to the popular use of modern devices such as smart phones.The stage artist from Las Vegas said that he hopes the show will spark some interest from the younger generation, entertaining them with stories from their culture and history.

Still, it's a combination of cutting-edge stage technology and tradition. With a modern theater featuring a revolving stage and a 360-degree LED screen surrounding the stage at a height of 9.5 meters, Splendor is expected to push the boundaries of performing arts and of spectator experience.

The 60-minute show will be staged in Wuxi's 2,000-seat Taihu Show Theater, which is tailor-made for the permanent show that has taken six years to accomplish.

With a design concept inspired by a bamboo forest, the theater has been rated as one of "the top 10 buildings for 2019" by The (London) Times. It is a theater worthy of presenting a show that is ready to stun the audience.

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2019-12-18 13:43:00
<![CDATA[Asian philosophy]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/17/content_1467842.htm

An ongoing exhibition at Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai features abstract paintings by Li Geng, son of Chinese master painter Li Keran, and Tang Shuangning, a retired financial executive and former president of China Everbright Group.[Photo provided to China Daily]

An exhibition spotlights abstract works by a former business tycoon and an established artist, Zhang Kun reports in Shanghai.

An ongoing exhibition at Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai has brought in lots of visitors from the financial and business sectors.

Audiences are curious about the artistic turn of Tang Shuangning, a retired financial executive and former president of China Everbright Group.

The exhibition that runs through Jan 12 features abstract paintings by Tang and another artist, Li Geng, who's the son of master painter, Li Keran (1907-89).

More than 50 paintings at the show belong to the collection of the Li Keran Art Museum in Beijing, where Li Geng serves as the executive director.


A piece from a series by Li Geng, named Mahler Symphony-Ink Space.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Tang says: "I'm an amateur artist. I paint and do calligraphy as a hobby since my retirement.

"I would have been a street artist if not for Li's trust, support... and the great platform he gave me for creation."

Li Keran was one of the most important Chinese artists of the 20th century. His son was born in 1950. Li Geng started to learn painting as a child from his father and other contemporary masters. He has grown into an international award-winning artist, recognized for his combination of Chinese aesthetics with Western creative methods.

"Li Geng's paintings are one of the contemporary paradigms of communication between China and the West," says Xie Xiaodong, curator of the exhibition.

"He is a scholarly artist with both traditional accomplishments and an international perspective. His ink paintings are diverse and full of charm. For many years, he has been striving to develop the intercultural dialogue of ink painting and portray the contemporary transformation of China."

On exhibition at Long Museum in Shanghai hosts a series by Li Geng named Mahler Symphony-Ink Space.


Li Geng draws a sketch while visiting a scenic spot.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Xie points out that while the works interpret the magnificence of Mahler's music, they're full of classical Chinese poetry.

"The melodies and rhythms of music are expressed in the hues and strokes of painting," Xie says.

He praises Li Geng's exploration of the ultimate connection between music and painting, and how they nourish the human spirit in the contemporary world.

Tang, however, didn't turn to artistic creation until he retired in 2017. The 65-year-old's artworks have been shown at home and abroad, including at such important international exhibitions as the 58th Venice Biennale.

"His philosophical ideas and poetic emotions that'd accumulated and were suppressed for more than 40 years burst from his paintbrush," Li Geng says about Tang.

"He created with great passion and power."

He believes Tang is a genius, whose abstract paintings contain music and poetry. These large works are created with saturated colors on collaged rice paper. Some are more than 8 meters long and 2 meters high.

"I don't believe abstract art belongs solely to Western artists," Tang says.

In China, abstract art grew from calligraphy and traditional free-stroke ink painting, he says.

"It is rooted in Chinese culture and deeply connected to such Chinese philosophies as Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism."

Tang calls for establishing a contemporary abstract methodology and philosophy of the East.

The abstract art of the East features the flow of qi, or life force, with lots of empty spaces in the compositions that present the essence of Eastern philosophy, he says.

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2019-12-17 09:09:03
<![CDATA[Experts mark 90th anniversary of Peking Man skull discovery]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/17/content_1467837.htm

Visitors look at relics at a museum of the Zhoukoudian Peking Man Site. This year marks the 90th anniversary of the discovery of the first Peking Man skull.[Photo/Xinhua]

Paleontologists gathered in Beijing earlier this month to mark the 90th anniversary of the discovery of the first skull of Peking Man, the Homo erectus who lived about 700,000 years ago in what are today the suburbs of China's capital.

Nearly 200 Chinese and foreign scholars attended the international symposium on paleoanthropology to share their latest discoveries and push forward research on human origins and evolution.

The first complete skull of Peking Man was found by Chinese archaeologist Pei Wenzhong in December 1929 at Location 1, or the Peking Man Site-one of the four sites in Zhoukoudian in Beijing's Fangshan district where ancient human fossils have been found.

The collection of fossils, including six skulls, unearthed at Location 1 in the 1920s and '30s, was found to belong to over 40 individuals.

Over the past 90 years, more fossils of ancient humans dating back to the Pleistocene era (about 2.9 million to 11,700 years ago) have been found at over 70 sites across China, Wu Xiujie, a researcher with the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said at the symposium.

The latest studies on Zhoukoudian sites show that the H. erectus in Far Eastern and African contexts can be grouped as the same species due to their similar characteristics, Wu says.

She says different H. erectus branches with complex physical characteristics and large internal variation may have existed in the late Middle Pleistocene in China.

"The discovery of the Peking Man fossils indicated the existence of H. erectus, which was a giant leap in the research of human evolution at that time," says Gao Xing, a researcher of the IVPP.

Gao and other scholars have kept searching for clues about the missing fossils at home and abroad, but found none.

"As long as there is any hope, we will spare no effort to look for them," he says.

"Zhoukoudian is not only a relic for visitors to remember but also a research base full of academic vitality."

Gao adds that more excavations and studies will be done at the site.

UNESCO listed it as a World Heritage Site in 1987.

"Zhoukoudian is more than a place where we found human fossils," says John Olsen from the University of Arizona. He adds that the legacy is of great significance for its "interdisciplinary perspective, long-term international collaboration and integrated paleoanthropological orientation".

The participants also celebrated the 90th anniversary of the founding of the IVPP.

"I think the IVPP is really now one of the most important institutions in the world in paleontology, thanks to the efforts made by the remarkable scientists," says Philippe Janvier, a French paleontologist.

Jingmai O'Conner, a foreign researcher who has worked in the IVPP for 10 years, says, "Nowhere else in the world is there such a large number of expert paleontologists under one roof-nor such incredible collections or the abundant resources to study them."

The IVPP will continue to cultivate talent in the fields of paleontology, paleoanthropology, archaeology, stratigraphy and paleoenvironmental studies. It'll establish a world-class scientific platform for studying biological evolution and the origins of human beings, says Deng Tao, director of the IVPP.

Some 90 specimens from the IVPP have been on display at an exhibition since Nov 30 to celebrate the two anniversaries.

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2019-12-17 08:34:33
<![CDATA[Luke Thompson caps off 1st China tour with Beijing show]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/17/content_1467850.htm

Luke Thompson. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Luke Thompson, an indie musician from New Zealand who released several folk songs that gained wide popularity in China, came to Beijing to stage a musical show at the live house Omni Space on Dec 15.

That's the last stop of his first concert tour in China, which included visits to Shanghai and Hangzhou to deliver shows and also marked his very first visit to the country.

Some of the folk singer-songwriter's musical works including On a Slow Boat to China which feature his reflections on life have struck a responsive chord in the hearts of many Chinese audience members and attracted more than 10,000 comments on China's major online music service platforms, such as QQ Music and NetEase Cloud Music.

He says it was three years ago when he started getting messages from Chinese audiences on social media and noticing that he had opened the door to fandom in a country so far away from his homeland and one he didn't know much about.

"Since being in China and listening to music here, I found that the scale that I used in the song (On a Slow Boat to China) is very Chinese sounding," he says, adding that maybe that's part of the reason why the song became a hit in China.

He says it's an amazing experience for him to be immersed in Chinese culture and music. During the tour, he wrote a song titled From Shanghai to Wherever I Will Go to memorize the precious journey.

"I want to just keep coming back here, release my music properly here through a label and trying to build an audience here," he adds.

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2019-12-17 09:58:11
<![CDATA[Cannes-nominated Chinese film grosses $27m at domestic box office]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/16/content_1467642.htm

A poster of  The Wild Goose Lake. [Photo/Mtime]

The Wild Goose Lake, a Chinese independent art film previously nominated for the Palme d'Or of the Cannes Film Festival, has raked in a box office of over 190 million yuan ($27.2 million) over the past 10 days since debuting on the Chinese mainland.

This is the second-best performance for a Chinese art film in the local market. Long Day's Journey Into Night, a film from young Chinese director Bi Gan, holds the record with 282 million yuan.

The Wild Goose Lake, directed by Diao Yinan, blurs the boundary between art films and gangster movies. It tells the story of how a desperate criminal ends his life with love for his family in a southern Chinese city.

Diao, born in 1968, won a Golden Bear for the best film at the Berlin Film Festival with Black Coal, Thin Ice.

Despite the difficulties facing China's film and television industry, art films are currently enjoying something of a renaissance. In the past, most art films reported dismal takings at the box office.

By attracting diversified investments and inviting popular stars such as Hu Ge and Gui Lunmei, The Wild Goose Lake generated significant buzz on social media. It even took advantage of Alibaba's Tmall gala and live webcast celebrity Li Jiaqi to further boost ticket sales.

"Chinese art films are making breakthroughs in terms of content, genre and distribution," said Shen Yang, producer of The Wild Goose Lake, who has brought many Chinese art films aboard.

The Wild Goose Lake has already been released in countries including New Zealand, Australia and Russia. It will hit screens in France and Spain soon and in the US in March 2020, Shen said.

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2019-12-16 10:02:07
<![CDATA[Former Australian official's book translated into Chinese]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/16/content_1467636.htm

Jocelyn Chey, former cultural counselor at the Australian embassy in Beijing, attends the book launch for her autobiography, Lodestar China, on Dec 5.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A trade show was held in Beijing in 1974, when some sheep were flown in from Australia for a special shearing demonstration. The sheep were so expertly handled by the shearer that the audience wondered if the sheep had been sedated. Years later, some residents of the Chinese capital still talked about it.

It is among many anecdotes recorded in Lodestar China, the autobiography of Jocelyn Chey, the first cultural counselor at the Australian embassy in Beijing.

The book was recently translated into Chinese and will be published as part of the Australia China Series. Published by Qingdao Publishing Group, the first edition of this series comprises six volumes of books written by a diverse range of Australian authors describing China. The series was launched at the Australian embassy on Dec 5.

"Lodestar, or polestar, helped sailors to find the right direction in the old days. It seems I was driven to China by an invisible force, like fate," says Chey while explaining the book title.

Chey learned Chinese at university back home, and pursued her master's degree in Hong Kong. She worked in Australia's ministry of overseas trade, the Australian embassy in China and the Australia-China Council to build relations between the two countries over the decades, and she also witnessed important bilateral events.

She remembers an exhibition of China's cultural relics being held in Australia in 1977, which attracted 600,000 visitors at that time. A precious suit of jade pieces tied together with gold wire and Terracotta Warriors from Xi'an aroused the interest of many Australians. As her embassy's cultural counselor back then, Chey says she held talks with Chinese officials about staging the exhibition and heard stories about these Chinese cultural relics from the officials.

Speaking about how this book came about, Chey says she was invited to write it by Hugh Alexander Dunn, a former Australian ambassador to China who was publishing a series called Australians in Asia in 1996. Lodestar China was the last work in that series, which had other 20 books by Australian diplomats, businessmen and journalists.

"Chey is definitely a legendary figure who pioneered in establishing relations between China and Australia, and the book tells me not only about her legendary career but also her family life as an ordinary woman," Dai Ning, the book's Chinese translator, says.

Dai says she spent a month translating the book. The whole process went off smoothly for her.

"Chey described many things in Beijing in the 1960s and '70s. As a local Beijinger, I'm familiar with the things she has described in the book."

Chey says when she wrote it in 1996, few woman worked in the Australian government.

She is also the only female author in the Australians in Asia series, so she wanted to offer a woman's point of view through this book.

"Men with careers only think about their career and never mention their family in their books. But when a woman has a career, she also considers how it affects her family," she says, adding that she talks of both her career and her family in the book.

Chey says she describes in her book how her late Chinese Australian husband, Hans Moon Lin Chey, "influenced every aspect" of her career. After his death in 2001, she donated money to a library at the University of Sydney to buy digital data about Dunhuang in Northwest China's Gansu province, where Buddhist frescos were discovered in the Mogao Grottoes, in the hope that Australian experts could find them interesting to study.

Other original Australian series translated into Chinese include George Johnston's novel, The Far Road, which helped to raise awareness in Australia about the Japanese invasion of China, Australians in Shanghai by Sophie Loy-Wilson that researched the diverse Australian community in Shanghai in the first half of the 20th century, and the influential work Why China by C.P. Fitzgerald, who spent 20 years living in China.

"The series is a reminder that we have a long history together and our common interests outweigh our differences," the Australian Ambassador to China, Graham Fletcher, said at the book launch. "I am confident that this series will help further build understanding between our countries."

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2019-12-16 09:27:52
<![CDATA[Russian Alexandrov Ensemble performs in China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/14/content_1467329.htm

Performers from the Russian Alexandrov Ensemble performed a dance at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Friday evening.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and Russia, and further strengthen cultural exchanges between the two countries, the world-renowned Russian Alexandrov Ensemble appeared at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Friday, bringing wonderful performances to Chinese audiences.


On Friday evening the Russian Alexandrov Ensemble performed a chorus at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


Actors from the Russian Alexandrov Ensemble left the scene after the curtain call at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Friday evening.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


Performers with the Russian Alexandrov Ensemble performed at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing I on Friday evening.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


Performers from the Russian Alexandrov Ensemble performed a dance at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Friday evening.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]


On Friday evening the Russian Alexandrov Ensemble performed a chorus at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.[Photo by Zhu Xingxin/China Daily]

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2019-12-14 13:32:12
<![CDATA[When East meets West, Macao's culture glitters]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/13/content_1467184.htm China's Macao Special Administrative Region (SAR) will celebrate the 20th anniversary of its return to the motherland next Friday.

After 20 year's development, Macao has become a world-renowned tourism destination, where Eastern and Western cultures have co-existed for over 400 years.

A wide variety of cultural traditions, languages, religious beliefs, and customs have all existed side by side and influenced one another. With traditional Chinese culture at its heart, Macao's culture is a diverse mixture assimilating Western, particularly Portuguese cultural influences.

In early 2019, the central government unveiled the Outline Development Plan for the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area, aiming to build Macao into an exchange and cooperation base with Chinese culture as its mainstream and the co-existence of different cultures.

The largest legacy of the eastern and western cultural combination is the Historic Centre of Macao, which has been accepted on the World Heritage List by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2005.

A total of 22 historic sites were recognized for having cultural and historic significance, including several churches, temples, fortresses, a lighthouse, a barrack and other buildings.

The most famous construction is the Ruins of St. Paul's, which refer to the facade of what was originally the Church of Mater Dei. The church was built in the 1700s but was destroyed by fire in 1835.

The old Church of Mater Dei, St. Paul's College and Mount Fortress were all Jesuit constructions and formed Macao's "acropolis."

Just 20 meters away from the Ruins of St. Paul's is the Na Tcha Temple. Built in 1888, Na Tcha Temple worships Na Tcha, a folk religious figure related to Taoism, providing a perfect example of the local Chinese traditions.

Besides the architectures, Macao also has diverse cultural traditions originated from the Chinese mainland and Europe. The Macao Special Administrative Region (SAR) government accepted both Chinese and Western festivals as holidays, such as Mid-Autumn Day, Easter, Christmas and Chinese Lunar New Year.

During the Buddha Birthday which falls on the eighth day of the fourth month in Chinese lunar calendar, Macao residents would go on the streets near the Ruins of St. Paul's to watch the performance of Drunken Dragon Dance, a tradition from South China's Guangdong province.

They would also join Our Lady of Fatima parade on May 13 every year to commemorate this Portuguese tradition.

Many local artists draw their inspiration for musics, dances and paintings from Macao's diverse culture.

Director Chen Yifeng's musical theater "Love in Macao" had been staged in Macao since the beginning of December, to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic ties between China and Portugal and the 20th anniversary of the return of Macao to the motherland.


"Love in Macao", performed by Chinese singers, tells a love story between the famous Portuguese poet Luis de Camoes, and a Chinese girl during his stay in Macao more than 400 years ago.

The musical theater includes both Eastern and Western-style songs, such as Cantonese folk songs, traditional Portuguese Fado music and aria of opera.

"To make such a musical theater is to create an artistic piece locally in Macao with an international perspective, a sense of the times and a historical depth," Chen said.

"I hope that it can tour around the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area and even be performed in Portuguese-speaking countries," he added.

Cai Jialin, general manager of the Macao Chinese Orchestra, said that she has tried to merge Chinese music with the traditional Portuguese musical form of Fado.

In July this year, the Macao Chinese Orchestra and Portugal's famous Fado singer Helder Moutinho joined hands to perform a concert combining Chinese and Portuguese music in Macao.

In Portugal in September, the Macao Chinese orchestra staged a concert in Lisbon, capital of Portugal, with a combination of Macao and Portuguese works, seeking to deliver a Chinese musical feast with Western highlights to the Portuguese audiences.

"The fusion attempt of Chinese silk bamboo and Portuguese Fado has begun to bear fruits and has been well received by the audience," she said.

The SAR government has supported and organized various cultural events both from China and abroad in recent years, to promote cultural exchange between East and West.

The Macao International Music Festival, organized by the Cultural Affairs Bureau of the SAR government, stages in Macao very year, featuring a series of concerts.

During 2019 festival, Mozart's classic opera the Magic Flute, jointly preformed by the Komische Oper Berlin and the British theatre company "1927", were staged in Macao's Culture Center.

The Yellow River Cantata, composed by the legendary Chinese composer Xian Xinghai, were also jointly staged by the Macao Orchestra and the orchestra of the National Centre for the Performing Arts and Chorus during the festival.

In addition, a concert performed by the Vienna Philharmonic, was staged during the festival.

The Cultural Affairs Bureau also started Art Macao 2019, a grand international art and cultural event, to present a series of outstanding exhibitions on the Italian Renaissance and Chinese modern and contemporary masters.

Officially inaugurated in June, Art Macao is a half-year-long initiative which bring together hotels and resort operators, and consular missions in the Macao SAR to organize exhibitions in the Macao Museum of Art and various resort venues.

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2019-12-13 17:32:02
<![CDATA[Jinan wins global status for livable environment]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/16/content_1467654.htm

The Jinan delegation cheers at the 2019 International Award for Livable Communities after winning the highest award in Rome on Dec 13. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Jinan's green and livable environment gained global recognition as the city won the top title at the 2019 International Award for Livable Communities (Livcom Awards) on Dec 13.

The event held in Rome, Italy, welcomed more than 100 world-renowned cities to compete including Vienna, Lisbon and Buenos Aires.

Launched in 1997, the LivCom Awards, is a global event focusing on the fields of city environmental management, resource utilization and sustainable development.

It is recognized as one of the highest honors in the urban construction across the world, and is widely praised as the "Green Oscar".


A bird's-eye view of Daming Lake, the only lake in the world formed by springs. [Photo/WeChat Account: jnslyj]

Jinan, capital of East China's Shandong province, made it for its remarkable achievements in the construction of ecological civilization, green economy and urban lives.

The city is home to numerous springs and weeping willows, leading to some rather distinctive scenery particular to the city. It remains a livable city of affluence and astounding natural beauty.

Using spring water to cook, wash and drink is the local way in Jinan, which makes the city of springs so special to visitors from home and abroad.

In June 2019, the cultural landscape of springs in Jinan was included on a tentative list of new Chinese World Heritage sites.


A view of Jinan's city moat [Photo/WeChat Account: jnslyj]

The city has long strived to promote the construction of infrastructure and sustainable projects.

Its green coverage has improved over time and the implementation of an eco-friendly drainage system has helped to create a healthier and safer living environment. Accordingly, the green coverage in urban areas reaches over 4.6 million square meters.

At LivCom, the city also won the only award for environmental protection and green economy, becoming the first city in Shandong province to earn such an honor.

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2019-12-16 10:40:29
<![CDATA[Hanêka and more]]> http://govt.chinadaily.com.cn/topics/cultureandarts/daurpapercuts

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2019-12-12 15:12:18
<![CDATA[New design store opens in Beijing]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/06/content_1465532.htm

Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Apartment101, a furniture store in Beijing, was formally opened at the end of November.

It adheres to the lifestyle concept of "No one lives like you" and focuses on the creation of personalized spaces.

The store carries a set of high-quality Nordic design brands, including: 101 Copenhagen, Norr11, Bolia.com, & Tradition, Montana, Artcoustic, AYTM, String and Volta.


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]

It invites people to explore new possibilities for space and strives to inspire with home furnishings.

With a total area of nearly 400 square meters, the space is divided into upper and lower floors plus a terrace.

For product display, the store hopes each small space will stay relatively independent but synergize with each other, so instead of making separate brand display areas, pieces from different brands will be mixed and matched together to create a complete and unique sense of home.


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo by Xu Haoyu/China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Designer furniture store Apartment101 opened in Beijing at the end of November. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-12-06 10:35:08
<![CDATA[ Weekly culture & leisure guide (Dec 6-13) ]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/06/content_1465514.htm Good morning dear China Daily readers! Discover the best things to do in major Chinese cities with our weekly roundup of trending arts, culture, and leisure activities around town. To recommend an upcoming event or activity, please contact culture@chinadaily.com.cn.

Films

Chinese actor Hu Ge is featured in a poster for Wild Goose Lake. [Photo/Mtime]

Highly anticipated noir Wild Goose Lake hits theaters today

Fans of Chinese top actor Hu Ge are set to be wowed by their idol's huge breakthrough in crime thriller Wild Goose Lake that hits the silver screen in Chinese mainland today.

Hu, whose past screen roles were usually handsome heroes, plays a gang leader who sacrifices everything for his family and a woman he meets while on the lam.

Aside from Hu Ge, the film helmed by Diao Yinan, director of the Golden Bear-winning film Black Coal, Thin Ice, also stars Berlin Film Festival Best Actor Liao Fan, and Golden Horse Best Actress Kwai Lun Mei.

Wild Goose Lake premiered at the 72nd Cannes Film Festival and even broke into the main competition section of the film festival in May.

Click here to learn more.


Lou Ye's Saturday Fiction stars A-list actress Gong Li. [Photo/Mtime]

Lou Ye's Saturday Fiction to hit big screens Saturday

Starring the incomparable, mesmerizing Gong Li, Chinese auteur Lou Ye's black-and-white spy thriller Saturday Fiction will be in theaters Saturday, taking audiences on a thrilling journey into the Japanese-occupied Shanghai on the cusp of World War II.

Making its global premiere at the Venice Film Festival in September, the nerve-wracking film follows Yu Jin, a top actress played by Gong, who realizes Japan's imminent attack on Pearl Harbor while acting as a double agent and gathering intelligence for the Allies in Shanghai.


Actress Tang Wei in a scene of the film The Whistleblower. [Photo/Mtime]

The Whistleblower

The Whistleblower, an action-packed film featuring actress Tang Wei, the star in Ang Lee's Lust, Caution, and actor Lei Jiayin, known for his role in the 2017 TV series The First Half of My Life, will whistle into theaters in the Chinese mainland today.

Helmed by Xue Xiaolu, one of the seven directors of the 2019 hit My People, My Country, the film was inspired by a real-life event in 2009, according to the director.

The film tells a story of a pair of ex-lovers, played by Tang and Lei, who partner up to embark on a thrilling cross-continent adventure to unravel a crime, which involves major bribery.

The Whistleblower was featured at a special screening during the 28th Golden Rooster & Hundred Flowers Festival held Nov 19-23 in Xiamen, East China's Fujian province.


Exhibitions

Chinese ink painting master Xu Beihong's work is on view at Nanjing Museum as part of a grand group show in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/IC]

Superstars of modern Chinese ink art shine in Nanjing

The Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, is staging a grand exhibition of modern Chinese ink art. First of its kind in terms of scope, the exhibition presents 158 signature works by eight of the most influential ink painting masters of modern China, including Qi Baishi (1864-1957), Pan Tianshou (1897-1971), and Xu Beihong (1895-1953).

"Their works in museum collections are officially rated as national treasures, and their painting styles and artistic thoughts have had a far-reaching impact on younger generations of Chinese ink painters," said Pang Ou, curator of the exhibition, art historian with the Nanjing Museum. " Their works on the market at home and abroad are the Holy Grails at major auctions."

Running until Feb 28, the exhibition will unfold in two phases due to a limited exhibition space, organizers said. Before Jan 10, 97 works will be on show, and from Jan 10 to Feb 28 another 61 works will be on display.

Click here to learn more.

If you go:

9:00-12:00, Monday; 9:00-17:00, Tuesday to Sunday. No. 321, Zhongshan Donglu, Xuanwu district, Nanjing. 025-8480-7923. 中国江苏省南京市玄武区中山东?21?南京博物?/em>


A landscape by late artist Wu Guanzhong goes on show at Art Nurtures Life, an exhibition that runs through May 3 at Tsinghua University Art Museum. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Wu Guanzhong's grand survey exhibition at Tsinghua Art Museum

Late Chinese painter Wu Guanzhong (1919-2010) is widely recognized as the founder of modern Chinese painting for masterly marrying the techniques of Western art with the aesthetics and philosophy of Chinese culture.

To mark the centennial of Wu's birth, a grand exhibition is being held at Tsinghua University where the artist had taught for years.

Themed Art Nurtures Life, the show presents 111 pieces of Wu's ouvre to chronicle his decades of dedication to the national art education.

Hailed as one of the most forward-looking artists in China, Wu first attended the China Academy of Art in the 1930s in Hangzhou, East China's Zhejiang province, and then lived and studied in France, where he was exposed to different art movements in Europe.

The exhibition ends on May 3, 2020.

Click here to learn more.

If you go:

9:00-17:00, Tuesday to Sunday. NO. 1, TsinghuaUniversity Campus, Haidian district, Beijing. 010-6278-1012 北京市海淀区清华园1?清华大学校内


Theater

Poster for Rhinoceros in Love [Photo/mengjinghui.com.cn]

Rhinoceros in Love celebrates its 20th birthday in Beijing

Acclaimed as "the bible of love for young people", Rhinoceros in Love by China's avant-garde theater director Meng Jinghui will be staged in Beijing from Dec 10 to Jan 5 to celebrate its 20th birthday since its 1999 premier in the Chinese capital.

Rhinoceros in Love will be performed at the Fengchao (Honeycomb) Theater which the director specifically spruced up for the show in 2008.

As one of Meng's beloved experimental works, the play tells a triangle love story in which a young man named Ma Lu is deeply enamored with a woman named Mingming and tries everything he can to win her heart. But after he fails, Ma, like a stubborn rhinoceros, goes to an extreme by kidnapping Mingming in the name of love.

If you go:

Dec 10-Jan 5. Fengchao (Honeycomb) Theater, No 3, Xinzhongjie, Dongzhimenwai Dajie, Dongcheng district. 86-10-6416-9253 北京市东城区东直门外大街新中??蜂巢剧场


A scene from  Matilda. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Award-winning Musical Matilda in Shanghai

Matilda, the sassy and brave titular role in the musical by the Royal Shakespeare Company, is inspiring and entertaining Chinese audiences in equal measure as the theater hit is touring China.

Inspired by the beloved eponymous book written by Roald Dahl, also author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, the musical Matilda has danced away with a phenomenal 86 international awards, including four Tony Awards since its debut in 2010.

It follows a little girl named Matilda who, armed with a fertile imagination and a sharp mind, dares to stand up for herself against bullies, her cruel parents and awful headmistress to change her own destiny along the way.

Click here to learn more.

If you go:

Dec 6-29, SAIC, Shanghai Culture Center, No. 36 Yongjia Lu, Luwan district, Shanghai. 8621-5461-9961 上海市卢湾区永嘉?6?上汽上海文化广场


Tango, a global byword for Latin passion, encompasses dance, music and poetry. [Photo/IC]

Grand tango feast to entertain major Chinese cities

Hailing from Argentina and Uruguay, the birthplaces of tango, the Tango Lovers Company brings its award-winning production I Am Tango to major Chinese cities including Xi'an, Chongqing and Guangzhou, with a troupe of 28 world-class tango musicians, dancers and singers.

As a new brainchild of the company, I Am Tango features a fine fusion of music, dance, costumes, lighting and multimedia to tell a story about how the titular character Tango, represented by a bandoneon player, travels through different times and situations in search of identity.

Founded by Uruguayan singer Alfredo Lerida, Tango Lovers is recognized by the Uruguayan government as a national brand.

If you go:

Dec 6, Dezhou Grand Theater, junction of Dongfanghong Lu and Kangbo Dadao, Dezhou Economic Development district, Dezhou city, Shandong province. 0534-223-7770, 0534-223-7700山东省德州市经济开发区东方红路与康博大道交界处,德州大剧?/em>

Dec 7, Dalian People's Culture Club, No 8, Zhongshan square, Zhongshan district, Dalian city, Liaoning province 0411-8263-3797; 0411-8253-2202 辽宁省大连市中山区中山广?? 大连人民文化俱乐?/em>

Dec 8, Shaanxi Opera House, Yanta Nanlu, Qujiang district, Xi'an city, Shaanxi province. 029-8550-1555西安市曲江新区雁塔南?陕西大剧?/em>

Dec 10, Chongqing Fuling Grand Theater, Jinxiu Square, Binjiang Lu, Fuling district, Chongqing 023-7277-0583, 023-727-0533 重庆市涪陵区滨江路两江广场右?涪陵大剧?/em>

Dec 11, Chongqing Guotai Arts Center, No 1, Linjiang Lu, Yuzhong district, Chongqing 023-6386-0599 重庆市渝中区临江?号国泰艺术中心剧?/em>


Poster for Mongolian vocalist Urna Chahar-Tugchi's Beijing concert [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Famed songstress stages Beijing solo

Bavaria-based Mongolian vocalist Urna Chahar-Tugchi will sing on Dec 8 at the Forbidden City Concert Hall in Beijing.

Urna is gifted with the ability to genuinely communicate with her listeners through her music, as she transcends all linguistic and cultural barriers with her dynamic, soaring voice.

Many of her songs evoke the immense grasslands of Mongolia and tell of the Mongolian ways of life.

If you go:

19:30, Dec 8, Forbidden City Concert Hall, inside Zhongshan Park, Xichang'an Avenue, Xicheng district, Beijing 010-6559 8285 北京市西城区西长安街中山公园内中山音乐堂

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2019-12-06 09:31:21
<![CDATA[App star]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/06/content_1465504.htm

Hi I'm China, the first publication by Institute for Planets, is a book about the geography and culture of China through which people can get to know the geographical features of different places and how the local customs developed around the local geological conditions.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A book on China's geography, based on articles published by a WeChat account, is a hot seller, Wang Ru reports.

On Nov 17, 2016, Geng Huajun went to bed after posting an article titled "What would you see if you made your way to Mount Everest's summit?" on his WeChat account, Institute for Planets.

When he got up the next morning, he was surprised to find the article had become popular overnight. It was read over 3 million times and earned the account some 60,000 followers.

Before that, Geng ran the untitled account to popularize geographical and cultural knowledge by himself as a geography lover. And his account only had 2,000 followers.


Hi I'm China, the first publication by Institute for Planets, is a book about the geography and culture of China through which people can get to know the geographical features of different places and how the local customs developed around the local geological conditions.[Photo provided to China Daily]

From then on, Institute for Planets has been promoting long-form articles about geographical conditions of many places in China and overseas, and is attracting more and more fans.

Institute for Planets published its first book, Hi I'm China, in September, which includes 16 articles that have already been promoted on the WeChat account introducing different parts of China, with some minor modifications. So far, the book has sold 300,000 copies and scored 8.2 points out of 10 on the popular review site Douban.

Zhang Xin, editor of the book, published by Citic Press Group, says: "Each Institute for Planets article is written in strict logic, with rigorous textual research, so we wanted to help them publish the book.


Hi I'm China, the first publication by Institute for Planets, is a book about the geography and culture of China through which people can get to know the geographical features of different places and how the local customs developed around the local geological conditions.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"It is considered to be a book of geological and cultural popularization. People can get to know geographical features of many places and how the local culture and customs have developed due to the geological conditions."

The book introduces 16 places in China, classified by their terrain. Each place is introduced through its features, accompanied by explanatory passages and beautiful photos.

"Generally, the book describes places in China from the highlands to the flatlands, from the wild to the urban," says Geng, who now heads a 20-odd team that operates Institute for Planets.

Geng points out the necessity for publishing this book: "Chinese people do not have enough understanding of Chinese geography.

"We had less clarity about China's geographical conditions until New China was established in 1949, when many research teams were organized to explore the geographical conditions. And only after that, in the 1980s, we started to have the technological means to show the results."


Hi I'm China, the first publication by Institute for Planets, is a book about the geography and culture of China through which people can get to know the geographical features of different places and how the local customs developed around the local geological conditions.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Moreover, the geographical books in China that have already been published are either complex professional books or books for teenagers, Geng adds. He says a book for all ages, including those that may not have an educational background in geography, was needed.

As a result, this book was pitched toward the general public.

Each article that Geng and his colleagues write for the WeChat account is quite long compared with other articles people read online, and takes readers about 20 minutes to read each on average. The number of followers, which is now around 2 million, are usually people who live in the bigger cities like Beijing and Shanghai, and the provinces of Guangdong, Jiangsu and Zhejiang.

"We advocate deep reading on mobile phone, and that is one of our features," Geng says.

He describes how his team members write articles. Now there are 25 people in Institute for Planets, and they are separated into three project teams, working on different projects simultaneously.

"When we write an article, we first decide the theme. Then we try to read as much background material about the theme before we start writing. We do not focus only on geography but also other fields to make our theme quite clear to our readers," Geng adds.


Hi I'm China, the first publication by Institute for Planets, is a book about the geography and culture of China through which people can get to know the geographical features of different places and how the local customs developed around the local geological conditions.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"A good article comes from the painstaking process of digesting all the material and extracting the key points. We spend 15 to 20 days on each article on average."

Geng and his team wrote an article introducing Wuhan city, in Central China's Hubei province, and it soon gained popularity. By focusing on Wuhan's feature as the city with the largest water area in China, it describes Wuhan's water networks, its role in China as a port in history and people's lives in modern times, shaped by its geology and culture.

"We carefully summarized the city's features and comprehensively introduced it in an article of around 5,000 words. The photos we used are suitable for viewing on a horizontal screen, which many readers like," he says.

Douban user "antingjiangshangke" wrote: "The photos in this book are very impressive, raising my interest in China's natural scenery, and I'd like to travel to the places it featured."


Hi I'm China, the first publication by Institute for Planets, is a book about the geography and culture of China through which people can get to know the geographical features of different places and how the local customs developed around the local geological conditions.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Beautiful photos are another feature of Institute for Planets' articles. Normally, dozens of photos can be found in each of their articles. The book contains 365 carefully-chosen photos taken by various photographers. The team are in contact with over 3,000 photographers and often buy photos from them. They also buys images from specialty map shops.

Geng also has some regrets about the book. For example, there are not many words as he had hoped in the book. And although it is a book about China's geography, many places in China with impressive geographical features were not included.

"It's just the beginning. We cannot cover every part of China, but we welcome suggestions from readers and will continuously improve our work in the future," says Geng.

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2019-12-06 08:41:29
<![CDATA[New style for Tibetan operas]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/09/content_1466105.htm Tibetan Opera finally had the chance to stun audiences at the China Theatre Festival that closed in Fuzhou, East China's Fujian province in November, 10 years after it was inscribed in the UNESCO intangible cultural heritage list.

"It shows that the value and charm of the ancient art are still relevant, even outside Tibet and among those who don't speak Tibetan," said Bamdien Wangjo, head of the Tibetan opera troupe in southwest China's Tibet autonomous region.

Tibetan opera combines talking, singing, acting, dancing and literature, and has a history of over 600 years. It is regarded as a "living fossil" of Tibetan culture.

Based on folklore, legends and Buddhist classics, traditional plays are usually staged on wheat-threshing floors, pastures and open floors in gardens and forests during the daytime. Without any curtains or lighting, performers wearing masks perform alongside drums and cymbals.

"As time changes, people don't have that much spare time and only succinct and clear plots can attract more people," Bamdien Wangjo said.

His play "The Love of the six-string guitar" is only 2 hours and 10 minutes long. Besides the signatory resounding and vigorous vocals, the audience can also appreciate unique ethnic elements of Tibetan dress and dancing. The number of mask-wearing performers has also been minimized, allowing the audience can see more facial expressions. The stage effects include snowflakes, wind, and vivid garden settings that add more flavor for the audience.

The play tells the story of a Tibetan serf girl and son of a noble family who in love because of a six-string guitar. Their love is doomed due to identity disparity but they manage to spend their twilight years together thanks to the democratic reform that happened in Tibet 60 years ago.

Since its debut in 2016, the play has been staged over 100 times for over 50,000 people.

Despite the declining influence of Tibetan operas, the protection and inheritance of Tibetan operas have been stepped up over the past decades. The government-funded Tibetan opera troupe was established as early as in the 1960s.


In 2006, Tibetan opera was included in the first batch of national-level intangible cultural heritages, three years before its recognition by the UNESCO.

To mark the 10th anniversary of its UNESCO listing, the troupe is driving the "modernization" of traditional operas, by integrating them with advanced stage technologies, using digital means for filing and spread, and creating modern plays.

"Creating a new play usually takes two years, and needs an up-front investment of more than 2 million yuan ($284,000). But new plays are more modern and are easy to be accepted by the masses," said Bamdien Wangjo.

He has been working in the troupe for 24 years and is the first Tibetan opera artist to receive the Plum Blossom Prize, the top theatre award in China.

"It's not only a personal honor but more importantly, the status and influence of Tibetan operas as a whole is elevated," he said.

Besides the troupe, the autonomous region has 153 folk Tibetan opera performing groups. The regional culture department said the central and local governments have invested nearly 50 million yuan in its protection and inheritance, and another 24 million yuan in the construction of related facilities.

Tibet now supports 12 national inheritors with a subsidy of 20,000 yuan a year, and 15 regional inheritors with 10,000 yuan a year.

"We will receive 1.5 million yuan in subsidies from the government as long as we put on 60 performances next year," said Penpa Sinoh, head of a folk opera team in Lhasa. He said the days of his group members running restaurants and driving taxis to support themselves are over.

Thanks to the booming tourism industry, the troupe does not have to depend on government subsidies to make ends meet. In November, 28 performers in Penpa Sinoh's group were invited to give touring performances in Beijing, Tianjin, Chengdu and other cities. When the tour ended, each of them had earned about 7,000 yuan.

"With the support from the government and market, we are confident to pass along the heritage," Penpa Sinoh said.

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2019-12-09 10:45:28
<![CDATA[Hit TV series gathers over 70 veteran actors]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/06/content_1465583.htm

Actor Fan Wei stars a character who is conflicted with his inner world. [Photo provided to China Daily]

With a stellar cast of up to 72 established actors joining hands, the new TV series New Fortress Besieges has recently soared as one of the most popular dramas in December.

With Yang Le ?son of the famous actor Yang Lixin ?and actress Chuo Ni in the lead roles, the 37-episode TV drama has aired on Beijing Satellite TV as well as the online streaming sites Youku, iQiyi, and Tencent Video since Dec 1.

Set in a fictional neighborhood in Beijing, the story chronicles a young couple's daily life to examine some of the most concerning social issues in a comedic way, striking a chord with most audience members.

Such scenes include parents of unmarried adults crowding in a local park to exchange information about their children, wishing to schedule blind dates to push the children to establish their own families as soon as possible.


Actress Hao Lei stars a government official. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Despite the fact that rising stars are playing the two leads, most of the cameo roles in the series are portrayed by award-winning veteran actors, including Fan Wei, a best actor winner of the seventh Beijing International Film Festival, and actress Hao Lei, credited for a string of internationally acclaimed films such as Mystery.

During a recent interview with domestic journalists, actor Yang Le recalls he was offered the script by writer Song Fangjin and director Wang Xiaolie in 2015.

"The drama captures in an interesting way the unique characteristics of Beijing natives, who fancy sharing everything in their lives with neighbors. And that is also a familiar feeling for me, which is easy for me to convey in acting," says Yang, who was born in Beijing in 1987.


Actress Chuo Ni and actor Wang Bowen star a couple of sibling. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Actor Yang Le stars a government clerk. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Actor Morni Chang stars the son, a shopkeeper who sells pig feet, of the character of actress Lyu Zhong. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Actress Liu Mintao and actor Liang Guanhua. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-12-06 16:17:09
<![CDATA[New 'Mulan' trailer released]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/06/content_1465563.htm

Disney released a new trailer for upcoming live-action feature Mulan, slated to hit the theaters in March next year.

The blockbuster, starring actress Liu Yifei in the lead role, is based on the Chinese legend of Hua Mulan and is a live-action remake of Disney's 1998 animated film of the same name.

The trailer was provided to China Daily by Disney.

 

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2019-12-06 14:22:10
<![CDATA[Filmmakers told to keep up good work in new era]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/20/content_1462039.htm President Xi Jinping encouraged Chinese filmmakers to create even more stellar works in the new era in remarks read at the opening ceremony of the five-day 28th Golden Rooster and Hundred Flowers Film Festival on Tuesday in Xiamen, Fujian province.

Huang Kunming, a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and head of the Publicity Department of the CPC Central Committee, conveyed Xi's words in his keynote speech at the ceremony, with the president praising the country's filmmakers for having created many excellent films and classic characters over the past 70 years.

Xi stressed that in the new era, Chinese filmmakers should strive to create stories revolving around people and endeavor to make excellent films the core of their work.

Huang said Xi hopes Chinese film industry workers constantly enrich their knowledge and seek high-quality development of Chinese cinema.

Huang added that Chinese filmmakers should polish their storytelling skills, participate more actively in international competitions and enhance Chinese films' presence on the global stage.

He also announced that the Golden Rooster Awards, which are presented every two years, will be awarded every year going forward.

As two of the most prestigious film awards in China, the Golden Rooster Awards and the Hundred Flower Awards have been offered in alternate years since 2005.

The festival this year will show 28 films from 29 countries, including positively reviewed works by new talent from nations involved in the Belt and Road Initiative and films directed by cinematic masters who previously won awards in Europe.

In addition, the event has drawn 35 new domestic films to exhibit at the event, and will have a section that highlights films shot by young talent from Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macao.

A total of 277 films, including 103 drama features, 25 children's films, 13 animated works and 28 documentaries, have been submitted to contend for 19 Golden Rooster Awards, such as best picture and best director awards.

The opening ceremony was held in Banlam Grand Theater, drawing a number of A-list stars and industry insiders.

Contact the writers at xufan@chinadaily.com.cn

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2019-11-20 04:00:07
<![CDATA[Ancient Civilizations Forum meets in Beijing]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/03/content_1464870.htm

Luo Shugang (center), Minister of Culture and Tourism of China, poses for a photo with foreign representatives attending the ministerial meeting of the Ancient Civilizations Forum in Beijing on Friday.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Eight countries jointly called for the revitalization of historical civilizations in the development of a contemporary world.

The Declaration of Beijing was endorsed and signed by the member countries attending the third ministerial meeting of the Ancient Civilizations Forum, which took place in the Chinese capital from Wednesday to Saturday.

Attendees included ministers or diplomats from the countries with ancient civilizations-Armenia, China, Egypt, Greece, Iran, Iraq, Italy and Peru.

It was reaffirmed that "the heritage and wisdom of ancient civilizations transcend time and boundaries, remain vivid and relevant in today's globalized world, and are of vital importance".

As stated in the declaration, "All civilizations form a common heritage for humanity. No civilization is judged superior to another." It also shows support for "an international multilateral system with the United Nations at its core".

The declaration encourages the "strengthening of communication and cooperation in combating and preventing illicit trafficking of cultural property, safeguarding cultural heritage, and enabling the return of illicitly acquired cultural properties to their countries of origin".

It also calls for promotion of exchanges in scientific and academic cooperation on the protection of tangible and intangible cultural heritage "within the framework of international organizations, and UNESCO in particular".

The Ancient Civilizations Forum was originally initiated by both China and Greece to play an active role in promoting mutual understanding and inclusiveness among different cultures, races and religions. The inaugural ministerial meeting of the forum took place in Athens in 2017, and the second edition was held last year in La Paz, Bolivia.

"The forum has the confident voice of ancient countries heard within the international community," Luo Shugang, Minister of Culture and Tourism of China, said in a keynote speech at the forum meeting on Friday. "It has orchestrated a new chapter for dialogue among different civilizations.

"Only when we protect, inherit, and develop our fine traditional cultures," he said, "can the countries with brilliant ancient civilizations be capable of fully displaying their glamour in the new era and offer psychological support for their own development and globally shared advancement."

Delegates echoed Luo's comments and rushed to highlight the significance of the forum.

Ali Asghar Moonesan, Iranian minister of cultural heritage, tourism and handicrafts, points out that there are lasting disputes and conflicts of interests in today's world. However, the emphasis on similarities of ancient cultures can better connect different interests.

"In a world that is interconnected and indivisible, the consensus of the international community for protecting the cultural heritage of humanity is indispensable," says Styliani Mendoni, the Greek minister of culture and sports. "Ancient wisdom can provide us both with a balanced and holistic approach to heritage and a vision on what heritage will be, what humanity will be in the years to come."

The next ministerial meeting of the Ancient Civilizations Forum will be staged in Peru in 2020.

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2019-12-03 08:39:45
<![CDATA[4th China-CEEC Ministerial Forum on Cultural Cooperation held in Skopje]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/28/content_1463844.htm SKOPJE, Nov. 26 (Xinhua) -- The two-day 4th Ministerial Forum on Cultural Cooperation between China and Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs) concluded here on Tuesday.

The event has opened a new chapter in international cultural cooperation, said Prime Minister of North Macedonia Zoran Zaev when attending the forum, adding that his country supports the initiative.

"This initiative is a great opportunity for all of us ... to join and all together to contribute to the advancement of our relations, both on the bilateral and multilateral level," said Zaev.

Minister of Culture of North Macedonia Hysni Ismaili said that the launch of the online platform will boost cooperation between member countries of the China-CEEC cooperation mechanism.

As one of the most important projects of the Cultural Cooperation Coordination Center established in March 2018 in Skopje, capital of North Macedonia, Ismaili said that the platform "will be a powerful driver" of the communication between member countries of the China-CEEC cooperation mechanism.

Chinese Minister of Culture and Tourism Luo Shugang said art and culture are a great heritage for both China and the CEECs, adding that China is always ready to join forces with the CEECs to enhance cooperation.

"I expect future joint efforts to build stronger partnerships and deliver concrete results in '17+1' cultural cooperation," he said. "The cooperation should be more innovative with culture being linked to other areas including tourism, commerce, sports and the health sector in order to offer a more enjoyable cultural experience."

Representatives from China and the CEECs agreed to fully implement the outcomes of the forum, and further promote the continuous development of cultural exchanges and cooperation.

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2019-11-28 09:25:30
<![CDATA[The origins of Taoism]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/11/content_1466669.htm ]]> 2019-12-11 12:00:00 <![CDATA[National Museum commemorates Shi Lu's 100th birthday]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/11/content_1466920.htm

Visitors take a photo of a painting by Shi Lu on Dec 11. [Photo by Jiang Dong/chinadaily.com.cn]


Visitors look at Shi Lu's works on Dec 11. [Photo by Jiang Dong/chinadaily.com.cn]


Visitors look at Shi Lu's works on Dec 11. [Photo by Jiang Dong/chinadaily.com.cn]


Visitors look at Shi Lu's works on Dec 11. [Photo by Jiang Dong/chinadaily.com.cn]


Shi Lu's writing tools. [Photo by Jiang Dong/chinadaily.com.cn]


Shi Lu's writing tools. [Photo by Jiang Dong/chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-12-11 19:42:33
<![CDATA[Book on Chinese workers' club celebrates China-Mongolia ties]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/05/content_1465333.htm The inauguration ceremony of a book on the Chinese workers' club was held at the Chinese Cultural Center here on Wednesday to mark the 70th anniversary of China-Mongolia ties.

Entitled Introducing the Chinese culture into Mongolia: A study on the Chinese workers' club, the book is based on facts and documents that were previously unexposed to the public.

In the 1950s and 1960s, China sent large numbers of workers to Mongolia to help with the development of its infrastructure.

According to the book's authors, the Chinese workers' club or the Chinese Cultural Center at that time was responsible for protecting the interests of Chinese workers in Mongolia, meeting their educational and cultural needs and introducing the traditional friendship between the two peoples to Mongolians.

"We have organized a series of events for the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between China and Mongolia this year," said Khasbagana, deputy director of the Chinese Cultural Center in Ulan Bator, at the opening ceremony. "The publication of the book is one of the planned works by our center to celebrate the anniversary."

It is of great importance to bring historical truth to light, as well as to study historical relationships and cultural collaborations between the two countries, Tserentulga Tumenbayar, one of the work's authors, told Xinhua, noting that the book has been published in Mongolian and English.

Tumenbayar said she believes that the book will be a useful guide for anyone who is interested in Chinese culture and the cooperation between China and Mongolia.

At the ceremony, around 300 copies of the book were donated to several Mongolian organizations.

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2019-12-05 10:52:14
<![CDATA[A fresh look at a vibrant scene]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/11/content_1466602.htm

Chinese singer-songwriter Liu Boxin (left) is featured in an episode investigating the appeal of dreadlocks and reggae music culture.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Master documentary maker switches from food to young people as he offers an appetizing glimpse of an evolving culture that is setting a trend, Chen Nan reports.

A master documentary maker of food, and the culture surrounding it, Zhu Lexian's appetite for change has been whetted by the tempting menu of highlighting youth trends.

A veteran producer of more than two decades, Zhu's documentaries, such as A Bite of China, a popular Chinese food program on China Central Television, and Once Upon a Bite, streamed by online platform Tencent Video, have gone beyond a core audience to offer a taste not just of cuisine but of contemporary society.

Now it's time for a new morsel.

Zhu took up a position as the head of the documentary studio at Tencent Penguin Pictures and opted to serve up a different subject for viewers to digest.

After more than a year of preparation and filming, Zhu produced an eight-episode documentary series, Generational Gravity, which premiered on Tencent Video on Nov 28.


Sun Yu, director of the first two episodes on street culture of the documentary series, Generational Gravity.[Photo provided to China Daily]

The first episode received in excess of 2.3 million views for its premiere.

The number of daily views of related posts among Sina Weibo's trending topics has reached over 56 million.

Featuring young people from 11 countries, the documentary has four key subjects of interest to the global young generation-street culture, beauty and makeup, hair styles and party culture.

It targets, in general, those who were born after 1990 and after 2000 in particular.

"I am not a trend follower so it's a hard topic for me," says Zhu, who graduated from the Communication University of China with a major in radio and television journalism in 1996.

"But I am very interested in the younger generation, not only Chinese but also young people from around the world.


Director Sun Yu filming skateboarders in Los Angeles.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"We've noticed that more and more young people, despite different cultural backgrounds, embrace and share similar lifestyles. We want to put those people on screen to speak for their generation."

The first episode of Generational Gravity focuses on a diverse group of young people in Los Angeles, the United States.

One is singer-designer Victor Ma, 23, who was born in New York and rose to fame after coming second in the hit Chinese reality show, The Coming One, in 2017.

"Many fashion brands, which are embraced by young people across the world, started by catering to the skateboarding and hip-hop cultures," says Ma in the show. "Let's start with exploring Los Angeles."

Ma knows the city's culture as he attended high school there and fell in love with hip-hop culture.


A scene from the episode that highlights young people's party culture.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Many iconic places in the city are featured in the show, such as Fairfax Avenue, known for trendy streetwear stores, and the Santa Monica Courthouse, an iconic skateboarding location.

Sun Yu, director of the first two episodes on street culture, says: "You can see lots of young people lean against the walls and snap photos of their outfits to post on Instagram while waiting for hours outside the shops to buy clothes and shoes. It's a scene which you could also see in Beijing. "The same pair of shoes could be popular both in Los Angeles and in Beijing. It's an inevitable evolution of the world, having a new generation of young people declaring their identity and living a lifestyle through street culture."

Born and raised in Beijing, Sun, 32, grew up listening to hip-hop music and is a big fan of H.O.T., a South Korean boy band.

He wears loose pants, sneakers and hoodies like any other trendy young person walking the streets of the capital.

It is not the first time that Sun has turned his camera on street culture. Last year, he directed a 13-episode documentary, Only Street Dance, covering the art form in Guangzhou, Guangdong province; Chengdu, Sichuan province; Shanghai and Beijing.


An American youngster displays his skateboarding skills on the streets of Los Angeles.[Photo provided to China Daily]

In Generational Gravity, he features a number of skateboarders, who helped build a thriving and vibrant skate scene, including Hu Tianyou, a professional skateboarder and fashion brand owner; Raph Cooper, co-owner of a Beijing-based company, Society Skateboards; and Xia Jiahuan, a co-founder of SoleStage, a leading limited-edition sneaker reseller.

Xia says in the show: "I made about 100,000 yuan ($14,207) a month by selling limited-edition sneakers when I was a freshman. It is a culture, which is crazy."

He co-launched the sneaker reselling brand in 2013 with two friends who shared a passion for athletic shoes. They began their shoe collections in their teens, and later were fired up with entrepreneurial zeal when they realized how profitable it could be.

The depiction of youth trends has attracted many.

One viewer, nicknamed Xiaoyu, comments on Sina Weibo: "It's a true, uplifting portrait of youth culture. In many ways, I learned about the notion of 'youth culture' although I am not a big fan of sneakers."

The Chinese singer-songwriter Liu Boxin, who is also known as Lexie onstage, was featured in the episodes, directed by Emmy-nominated director Christine Yuan, exploring reggae culture, from music to dreadlocks.

The 20-year-old Liu, who was born in Changsha, Hunan province, visited Shanghai, New York and Los Angeles while filming the show.


A scene from the episode focusing on beauty and makeup trends among the young women around the world.[Photo provided to China Daily]

She is one of the five celebrity guests invited to participate in the program. Other guests are Victor Ma and Hu Tianyou, crossover model Wu Jiaye, and model-singer Zhu Jingxi.

Liu recalls: "I went to some old-school barber shops in Shanghai, where older people go. It offers me a different side to a metropolis that is generally considered modern and international."

Together with the documentary production team Liu also went to Tokyo and Jamaica during the shooting of the episodes featuring reggae culture.

When she arrived in Tokyo, Liu met and talked with people sporting dreadlocks.

Then she flew to Jamaica to explore the appeal of dreadlocks which are universally identified with Jamaica and reggae culture.

The people she met in Jamaica were warm and friendly, making her feel at ease and reassured.

"We went to a party, which was held in a shabby garage. We danced with local people and I also sang together with local reggae musicians, which was fun," she says.

"Despite cultural differences, we shared fun moments together."

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2019-12-11 08:38:55
<![CDATA[China's 'Game of Thrones' set for online release]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/10/content_1466408.htm

War of Seven Kingdoms, a documentary dubbed by some as a Chinese equivalent of Game of Thrones, will air on Tencent Video, a popular video streaming site, for its premium members on Dec 11.

Witten and directed by award-winning filmmaker Jin Tiemu, the seven-episode documentary focuses on the rise and fall of the seven kingdoms in the Warring States Period (475-221 BC) in ancient China.

Although each episode features a well-known actor playing the key roles, such as a king, a minister, a prince or a scholar-turned strategist, the documentary has all its plots well grounded on established historical records and archaeological findings, the director said at a press screening on Dec 9.

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2019-12-10 14:51:36
<![CDATA['Downton Abbey' to hit big screen in China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/10/content_1466370.htm

A scene from  Downton Abbey. [Photo/Mtime]

Downton Abbey, the first big-screen adaption of the British historical period drama television series of the same name, is set to hit the big screen in China on Friday, Dec 13, according to the China Film Distribution and Exhibition Association.

Directed by Michael Engler and starring the original cast, the film follows the lives of the Crawley family and their intrepid staff preparing for one of the most important moments of their lives.

The storyline revolves around a royal visit from the King and Queen of England that unleashes scandal, romance and intrigue that will leave the future of Downton Abbey hanging in the balance.

The film boasts a score of 8.1 out of 10 on film review platform Douban based on more than 8,700 reviews.

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2019-12-10 10:31:09
<![CDATA['Dilili in Paris' by legendary French animator to hit Chinese theaters]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/12/content_1466823.htm

[Photo/Mtime]

Dilili in Paris, an animated adventure film written and directed by legendary French animator Michel Ocelot, is set for theatrical release in China on Dec 21, according to the film's official Weibo account.

The storyline revolves around a Kanak girl investigating mysterious kidnappings of girls in Paris in the Belle Epoque, which, literally meaning "Beautiful Age," is a name given in France to the period roughly from the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the start of World War I in 1914.

[Photo/Mtime]

Michel Ocelot's best-known films include Kirikou and the Sorceress (1998), and Princes and Princesses (2000).

Dilili in Paris won the 2019 Cesar Award for Best Animated Feature.

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2019-12-12 08:30:00
<![CDATA['Transformers' to join Chinese mythological icon 'Nezha' in new animation series]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/12/content_1466812.htm

A poster for  Nezha: Transformers. [Photo/Mtime]

American toymaker Hasbro's iconic Transformers will join the Chinese mythological figure Nezha in a new animated co-production, the company said Wednesday.

A poster of the new animation series was released by Hasbro on its official Weibo account Wednesday morning, along with a brief announcement about the co-production with CCTV Animation, the animation arm of China's state broadcaster.

CCTV Animation also released the poster on its Weibo account Wednesday, saying that Nezha: Transformers will bring together the "world-famous animation icon" of Transformers and Nezha that "represents Chinese culture and spirit."

As a popular figure in Chinese legends, Nezha has inspired multiple films and TV series. The most recent big-screen adaptation, a 2019 film directed by Yang Yu, who goes by the nickname Jiaozi, has grossed nearly 5 billion yuan (about 710.64 million US dollars) on the Chinese mainland and is now the second-highest-grossing film in Chinese history.

According to the poster, the Transformers will still take on their original robotic form but will have a new "hairstyle" with two pigtails resembling Nezha's.

No further details were given about the new co-production.

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2019-12-12 09:24:43
<![CDATA[Young vlogger tells story of China in picturesque videos]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/11/content_1466672.htm

Vlogger Li Ziqi. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

Picture a young woman, dressed in traditional Chinese attire made from hemp, as she picks flowers from a field to make a natural blush for her cheeks. Imagine the same person, assembling a sofa from bamboo, brewing soy sauce from scratch and cooking up all sorts of delicious Chinese food.

It may sound surreal, but such a person exists in real life, and her name is Li Ziqi.

Li, a vlogger who enjoys a fan base of more than 21 million people on Sina Weibo and 7 million strong followers on YouTube, has made a name for herself in her videos that highlight a traditional Chinese way of life in the rural areas of Sichuan province. Her videos cover a wide variety of crafts related to traditional Chinese culture. From making paper and ink to weaving cloth, from making a silk quilt comforter for her grandmother to building her own bread kiln with blocks, nothing seems impossible with Li's crafty hands as they work their magic to bring these things into existence.

But Li's most eye-catching, and mouth-watering craft is cooking.

A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

Li scarcely speaks in her videos. When she does open her mouth, the most common phrase that comes out is her calling her grandmother to come and eat.

Instead of dialogue, Li focuses on how she works with her hands.

Scenes of the young vlogger picking seasonal ingredients from her own garden (and sometimes in the mountains and rivers near her residence) and turning them into luscious dishes on her wood-fired wok dominate her videos. A warm bowl of soup for the winter, a lighter plate of noodles for the summer. Li emphasizes the seasons in her cooking, as China's traditional 24 Solar Terms also do, and makes food suitable for the particular climate.

All this is done against a picturesque panorama of the four seasons beautiful enough to be featured in films.

Watching her videos, it is difficult not to appreciate their beauty and hold back that sense of nostalgia and longing for home. But it is even harder to not want to take a bite of her succulent dishes.

Li Ziqi (right) and her grandmother. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

Cynic food critic Anton Ego in Ratatouille was immediately brought back to his childhood after he took a bite of Remy's humble masterpiece. And it is true that the taste of home is almost unforgettable. Brewing soy sauce, steaming sweet buns, sun-drying persimmon cakes and pickling vegetables, every scene is delicate and gentle, reminding viewers of taste of our childhood and home.

"My heart warmed up as I watched her flip soybeans in the video for making soy sauce. I was really moved. I used to do this kind of work when I was young," comments Weibo user July of Jiangnan.


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

"Li Ziqi is not made without passion. Without passion, you cannot understand Li Ziqi," the official Sina Weibo account of China Central Television comments on the Sichuan native's sensational popularity around the world.

"The success of Li Ziqi lies in her passion -- passion for life, for her home and for her culture. She does not say much, but she told the stories of China's culture and that of China," the television station added in its post, which has been read by more than 11 million internet users.

Li Ziqi (right) and her grandmother. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

Li, who was born in 1990, has been living with her grandparents in the rural parts of Mianyang, Southwest China's Sichuan province, since the age of 6 after her father died. Li has always been crafty with her hands, having helped with her grandfather's carpentry and grandmother's housekeeping from a tender age.

Life was difficult for her during her youth as she and her grandparents had little to live on. Li herself revealed that she was "economically supported" to continue schooling. She started to work in the city at 14 and would not have returned to her childhood home if not for her grandmother falling ill in 2012.

After returning home, Li opened an online shop, Li Ziqi, to sell mostly edible products. To boost sales, she began making short films in 2016 about how these products were created, while covering her life in the rural area, all against the backdrop of traditional Chinese aesthetics.

"I started it because I wanted to create something for people to watch and relax. We are all under a lot of stress. I hoped that after a long and busy day, they could click on my videos and relieve some of their anxiety and pressure," Li said.

But her videos did more than that. Viewers from both home and abroad are hooked.

"Who else is happy whenever she uploads?" reads a comment by YouTube viewer Ira Shayne.

A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

"She uses things that are common in life, but I never gave any thoughts on where those things came from. Thank you for giving me an opportunity to get to know them better!" write Sina Weibo user Qin Fengqin.

"She's a gift from heaven," comments YouTube user Jill Hoola.

"I just discovered your videos last month and I'm hooked. Thank you for your inspiring and relaxing videos," writes YouTube user Odessa Villareal.

Her latest video on brewing soy sauce, uploaded on YouTube on Dec 4, has received more than 3.4 million views in less than a week. The same video drew more than 35 million views on Sina Weibo.

Li is not without criticism, such as remarks about her "beautifying" life in the country and her use of a professional production crew to help her film. Others have expressed skepticism about how "real" her videos are, and how "amazing it is that she looks so picture perfect after a long day of work in the fields."

Watch Li Ziqi's videos here.


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]


A scene from Li Ziqi's video. [Photo/Sina Weibo account of Li Ziqi]

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2019-12-11 14:41:31
<![CDATA[Bringing tai chi to NYC]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/12/content_1466803.htm

Lin teaches an elderly student during a group tai chi class at the club house at The Seasons in East Meadow, New York.[Photo/Xinhua]

A former tai chi world champion is making martial arts an everyday part of New York life in the hope of broadening the appeal of Chinese culture, Xinhua reports.

The ancient Chinese martial art of tai chi is increasingly becoming a way of life for many New Yorkers, thanks in part to the efforts of former world champion Chen Sitan and his wife Lin Xu.

From 5-year-olds to people in their 70s, New Yorkers of every background have been attracted to tai chi through the couple's classes, the tai chi and health qigong festivals they organize, and the community events they initiate in libraries and retirement clubs.

Chen started learning martial arts at age 6. By age 30, when he retired from his athletic career, he had already won 32 gold medals in Chinese and international competitions.

After coaching athletes for several years, Chen decided to come to the United States in 2003 in the hope of broadening the appeal of Chinese culture through tai chi.

"Tai chi is not just about competition. It means much more-it's a way of life," says Chen.


Chen practices tai chi with students at Sitan Tai Chi and Martial Arts in New York.[Photo/Xinhua]

The couple started teaching tai chi and other martial arts in schools, before founding Sitan Tai Chi and Martial Arts to promote tai chi and provide a forum for fans.

The school's class schedule now includes different forms of tai chi, such as 24 form and 42 form, tai chi sword, tai chi kung fu fan, health qigong and other martial arts.

Tai chi's slow, graceful movements are accompanied by deep circular breathing. The movements work with qi, or life force, a type of "flow" that everyone has, says Lin.

There is growing evidence that this body-and-mind practice that started in China as a martial art has value in treating and preventing many health problems.

This gentle form of exercise can help maintain strength, flexibility and balance, and may be practiced at any age, according to a study by Harvard Medical School.

Lin says people from different age groups come to her classes for different reasons.

"Parents send their kids to my class to improve their fitness and learn about Chinese culture, while adults attend to relieve work stress. Retirees practice it to prevent health problems," she says.


Lin teaches kids at the martial arts school.[Photo/Xinhua]

Frank Mandarino, who has been practicing tai chi for 11 years at Sitan Tai Chi and Martial Arts, says: "As an engineer and then a sales manager, I was on phone a lot and developed poor posture. I needed to get back into some healthy type of lifestyle after I retired, and I found tai chi."

He adds that he enjoys the challenge of tai chi, which he says is difficult as people need to coordinate their muscles with the movements.

"The more you do it, the more relaxing it becomes. It's almost meditative," says Mandarino, who is 81 years old.

Chen and Lin don't just teach martial arts. They also use it to promote Chinese culture.

"Language is one of the biggest barriers when discussing Chinese culture with foreign audiences, but since tai chi relies on body movements, there are no real barriers," says Lin.

She adds that tai chi performances in community centers are always well-received as local residents get to see what tai chi is all about for themselves.

"That's much more powerful than words," says Lin.

Chen, who is also the founder and chairman of the Tai Chi Qigong Association of America, set up the Tai Chi and Health Qigong Festival in New York, which has been held for the past eight years.


Chen Sitan and his wife, Lin Xu, perform tai chi at Times Square in New York.[Photo/Xinhua]

The annual festival features a range of presentations, demonstrations and short classes joined by dozens of teams from around the New York City metropolitan area.

"As time goes by, people realize that the core value of tai chi is balance," says Chen.

He explains that tai chi embodies the Taoist philosophy, which advocates a balanced body, a balance between body and mind, and a balance between humans and nature.

"We internalize this philosophy through practicing tai chi every day," says Chen.

Jean Kestel has been coming to group classes for about four years. She regards tai chi as an enjoyable form of communal exercise.

"I took pictures of people practicing tai chi in parks and malls in China when I visited in 2003. That's not common in the United States," she says, adding that the classes offer her a chance to stay in touch with Chinese culture. She plans to visit China again next year.

As popular as tai chi is in and around New York, Chen is still looking to develop a training program and grading system that will help him train more qualified teachers.

"A standard, effective and practical training and grading system will help unite all the teachers who are out there promoting tai chi on their own to work together for the noble cause," says Chen.

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2019-12-12 08:39:17
<![CDATA[Baishiya Karst Cave one of top 10 archeological finds in 2019]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/12/content_1466830.htm

A screenshot of the webpage of US Archeology magazine. [Photo/Official WeChat account of Lanzhou Morning Post]

Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe county, Northwest China's Gansu province, was recently recognized by Archeology magazine in the US as one of the top 10 archeological discoveries in 2019.

Some 40 years ago, a Buddhist monk uncovered a mandible (lower jaw) in the cave, which is more than 10,000 feet above sea level on the Tibetan Plateau.

Archeologists have verified that the mandible can be dated back 160,000 years, and analysis of proteins from its teeth indicates that it belonged to a member of the hominin species known as Denisovans.

The Denisovan mandible found in Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe county, Northwest China's Gansu province, is recognized by Archeologymagazine in the US as one of the top 10 archeological discoveries in 2019. [Photo/Official WeChat account of Lanzhou Morning Post]

"This mandible reveals that Denisovans were geographically distributed much more widely and at a higher altitude than we previously thought," said archaeologist Zhang Dongju of Lanzhou University.

The mysterious ancient humans were previously known only through fragmentary remains found solely in southern Siberia's Denisova Cave, which is merely 2,300 feet above sea level and almost 1,750 miles northwest of Baishiya Karst Cave.

A 3D model of a Denisovan mandible found in Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe county, Northwest China's Gansu province. [Photo/Official WeChat account of Lanzhou Morning Post]

Earlier studies of Denisovan genetic material had detected a mutation that enabled them to survive in low-oxygen environments characteristic of extremely high-altitude locations, such as the Tibetan Plateau.

This same mutation has been identified in present-day Tibetans, and the discovery that Denisovans once inhabited the region may explain how they obtained this life-preserving adaptation.

The picture shows a view of Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe county, Northwest China's Gansu province. [Photo/Official WeChat account of Lanzhou Morning Post]

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2019-12-12 11:03:03
<![CDATA[Intl photography festival lifts its curtain in Xiamen]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/23/content_1463265.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The Opening Weekend of 2019 Jimei x Arles International Photo Festival from Nov 22-25 welcomes photography lovers with a range of events and activities: exhibition tours guided by artists and curators, book signings, seminars, workshops, and cultural performances.

Taking place in Xiamen, East China's Fujian province, this year's program presents 30 exhibitions and 55 artists from China, including Taiwan, France, the UK, Ireland, Greece, Italy, Sweden, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Sri Lanka, the US and India.

The festival also promotes Chinese talents on an international scale, with its Discovery Award presented in Arles every year. This year the event will also hold Jimei x Arles Women Photographers Award, the first-ever photo award in China dedicated to women photographers.

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The 2019 event marks the fifth time for the Les Rencontres d'Arles in France, equivalent to the Cannes International Film Festival in the photography world, to join hands with Jimei district in Xiamen, with a view to offering a golden chance for photography buffs to enjoy works from across the globe.

Local authorities said the photography festival is a significant vehicle for Sino-France cultural exchanges, and it offers an excellent opportunity for the Jimei district, a residential and business area in the city that promotes a high-quality lifestyle and is an integral part of Xiamen's position as a "scenic and culturally profound city".

They also said the four earlier sessions of the Jimei Arles International Photography Festival were of great significance for the district to demonstrate its cultural appeal and promote its urban cultural industries.

Cocreated by Chinese pioneer photographer Rong Rong, founder of China's first photography museum Three Shadows Photography Art Centre and Sam Stourdzé, director of Rencontres d'Arles (France), Jimei x Arles has become a must-see event for photo lovers in China, and attracted more than 230,000 visitors in the previous years (70,000 in 2018).


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Influential figures of the Chinese art world are consultants for the 2019 edition of the festival: Gu Zheng (independent art historian and critic), Huang Rui (artist), Li Ge (chairman of the Chinese Photographers Association), Tang Xin (director of Taikang Space, Beijing), Philip Tinari (director of UCCA, Beijing), Wan Jie (chairman and president of Artron Art Group).

The festival will have two main sites around Xiamen's Jimei district this year: Three Shadows Xiamen Photography Art Centre and Jimei Citizen Square Main Exhibition Hall. Xiamen, formerly known as Amoy, a coastal city located across the Taiwan straits, has been an important port for centuries, famous with tourists for the colonial-era Gulangyu island, and now a vibrant and modern city that has become home to China's independent fashion scene.

Local Action, a special sub-exhibition of the festival, explores the links between photography and the local environment. This year, Magnum veteran Guy Le Querrec brings The Chinese Gesture, a series of photos he took during his voyages in China in the 1980s.

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The exhibition shows Guy Le Querrec's unique perspective on a transitioning China, in 70 shots of large cities ?Beijing, Wuhan, Shanghai Suzhou, Nanjing, Guangzhou, Chengdu, Chongqing, Xiamen, Quanzhou, and the countryside of Fujian province.

Every year, Jimei x Arles focuses on the photographic scene of an Asian country. After South Korea (2018) and Indonesia (2017), this year Jimei x Arles invites India, with exhibitions curated by Indian photography specialists and produced in partnership with the Alkazi Foundation for the Arts (New Delhi) and the Museum of Art & Photography (Bangalore).

The contemporary work on display is shown alongside a range of early colonial photography on the subcontinent, from which much of it departs, forming a dialogue between the past and present, and revealing some of the influences of 21st-century practice.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Eight exhibitions were shown during the summer at Rencontres d'Arles travel to Jimei x Arles, including:

Tom Wood Mothers, Daughters, Sisters

Philippe Chancel Datazone

Evangelia Kranioti The Living, The Dead, and Those at Sea

Clergue & Weston First Show, First Works

The Anonymous Project The House

The Saga of Inventions - From the Gas Mask to the Washing Machine CNRS Archives

Maté Bartha Kontakt

The 2019 Arles Book Awards

If you go:

10:00-17:30, Three Shadows Xiamen Photography Art Center and Jimei Citizen Square Exhibition Hall, Jimei district, Xiamen.

Ticket: 60 yuan ($8.5), 30 yuan ($4.3 for students, teachers, and military personnel)

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2019-11-23 16:00:00
<![CDATA[Century-old Tibetan knife-making craft paves way for better life]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/04/content_1465137.htm ]]> 2019-12-04 11:00:44 <![CDATA[Ancient tombs of Tang Dynasty unearthed in Xinjiang]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/03/content_1464942.htm ]]> 2019-12-03 10:43:22 <![CDATA[Macao Chinese Orchestra attend rehearsal at Broadway Theater in Macao]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/04/content_1466443.htm

Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, South China, Nov 3, 2019.[Photo/Xinhua]


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201


Members of the Macao Chinese Orchestra attend a rehearsal at the Broadway Theater in Macao, south China, Nov. 3, 201

 

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2019-12-04 11:41:54
<![CDATA[Film festival: Cinema as 'vehicle for cultural dialogue']]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/23/content_1466220.htm

Film is an art form that transcends borders and a universal language that goes directly to our hearts. From Nov 15 to 24, the Festival of German Cinema will hit the big screens of Beijing. With a diverse selection of the latest and greatest from Deutschland's directors, the festival has attracted a sizable following among local film buffs.

The opening ceremony of the festival took place at the Broadway Cinematheque MOMA, a trendy landmark in Beijing. In this episode of Easy Talk, we meet three guests ?the managing director of German Films, the director of the Goethe-Institut, and the cultural counsellor of the German embassy in China ?to hear their insights about Sino-German cinematic cooperation and how to introduce Chinese culture to a wider audience.

This year, actor Wang Jingchun has been invited as the ambassador for the festival. At the Berlinale this February, he just scooped a Silver Bear Award for Best Actor.

"The first German film I watched is The Tin Drum by Volker Schlöndorff. It was nothing like any films I had seen. A very powerful experience," Wang said. "Film is the best vehicle for cultural dialogues. As an actor, in my area of expertise, I'd like to support more exchanges in the film industry."

Guests: Simone Baumann; Dr. Clemens Treter; Katrin Buchholz; Wang Jingchun

Reporter: Li Wenrui

Camera: Yang Xiaoyu

Editing: Li Wenrui

Copy Editors: Faisal Kidwai; Jocelyn Eikenburg

Subtitles: Sun Jiao

Producer: Li Wenrui

Executive Producer: Feng Minghui

Acknowledgements: German Films; Goethe-Institut China; German embassy in China

Contact the producer at liwenrui@chinadaily.com.cn

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2019-11-23 13:57:11
<![CDATA[Sci-fi author Hao Jingfang on writing, education and parenting]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/05/content_1465354.htm

Devote yourself to the work you do, not the prize you might get. Hao Jingfang, a Tsinghua University alumna, is pursuing her passion for writing and education.

In 2016, she won the prestigious Hugo Award with her novella, Folding Beijing, which made her the first female writer in China to bring home this prize. Later on, the author turned to education. She set up Tongxing Academy for public welfare education and WePlanets to foster children's creativity after school.

In this interview with Easy Talk, Hao discusses her life experience ?not only as a writer and educator, but also a parent.

Hao Jingfang wins the Hugo Award for her work Folding Beijing in 2016. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"The major task for society is to help people get better education, to elevate their skill set in line with future technological advancements, and to broaden their horizons," Hao said.

Since founding her company, Hao has been carrying out voluntary teaching programs in rural areas. "We really want these kids to have better education resources like kids from the cities," she said. "We hope that the children from rural China, if one day they manage to live in the cities, can do more than car maintenance, for example. They will have the skills to take on other jobs."

Different from the typical Chinese parents so ambitious for their children, Hao suggests giving kids more space for trial and error. "I do believe the best mentality for parents is to stand behind your children," Hao said. "Let the child cope with the reality and decide for themselves. If they struggle with obstacles, you can offer them some guidance or encouragement."

Hao poses for a photo with children in an outdoor learning program. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"I've had a wide variety of interests since childhood. I've got used to doing different things," says the 35-year-old.

Being an economic researcher, a writer and entrepreneur herself, she encourages all women to discover their passions. "We live in a big, big world with boundless possibilities, various trades and different vocations. Don't be too afraid to try something new. When you find the one thing that you want to commit to, you will become fearless to follow your dream."

Explore more exciting topics from Easy Talk, a cultural interview series by China Daily.

Guest: Hao Jingfang

Reporter: Li Wenrui

Camera: Yang Xiaoyu

Editing: Li Wenrui

Copy Editors: Ian Goodrum; Gu Xin

Subtitles: Sun Jiao

Producer: Li Wenrui

Executive Producer: Feng Minghui

Acknowledgements: Tongxing Academy

Contact the producer at liwenrui@chinadaily.com.cn

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2019-12-05 13:00:11
<![CDATA[Exploring cultural relic restoration at the National Museum of China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/06/content_1465596.htm

A bronze shell needs cleaning and rust removal. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

In 2018, the National Museum of China set up an institute to protect cultural relics, serving as a platform to provide restoration services for the collection of 1.43 million cultural relics in the museum, and to offer technical support for the progress of the restoration industry.

The institute, with 40 restorers, has covered almost every aspect of cultural relic protection, including environmental monitoring, inspection and analysis of collections, as well as the restoration of metal and nonmetal wares, ink paintings, oil paintings as well as calligraphy.

While repairing cultural relics may sound mysterious, now you have a chance to follow China Daily to explore how the experts do it.


Li Mo, the restorer, takes a sample of a relic from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Li Mo, the restorer, works on a relic of the Ming Dynasty on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Zhang Ran, a restorer, uses a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to detect the metal composition of an iron sword of the Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220) on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Restorer Zhang Ran is reading the portable X-ray fluorescence spectrum data of the iron sword of the Han Dynasty on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Restorer Ma Lizhi works on a bronzeware on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A cultural relic needing restoration is photographed on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A sample from a cultural relic is seen in a scanning machine on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


The inspector Yang Qin shows the results of the scanning analysis of the cultural relic samples on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


The natural dye in the analysis room is the standard sample for the analysis and detection of cultural relics. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Restorer Wang Qiuzhong and his apprentice Lyu Xuefei are working on a Chinese painting on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


The restoration of a rubbing of an arhat in the 18th century from the Tibet Museum is completed on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Restorer Wang Xilin works on ancient scriptures from the Tibetan Museum on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


Restorer Li Zheng explains the mounting of traditional calligraphy and painting on Dec 3, 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2019-12-06 17:34:16
<![CDATA[When a fruit is also a tonic]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/07/content_1465751.htm

The best jujubes in China are from Xinjiang in the northwest. [Photo provided to China Daily]

An old Beijing courtyard home, Peking duck, Cantonese soups, Xinjiang. What do these all have in common? Jujubes, the Chinese red date.

It is totally unrelated to the sweet date palm from the Middle East in spite of the name. It is a fruit tree, Ziziphus jujuba, more related to the buckthorn. The tree has long been valued by the Chinese, and its dried fruits are standard pantry basics in almost every Chinese household.

They are added to soups for another level of fruity sweetness. They are boiled with brown sugar and ginger for a revitalizing drink. They are stuffed into breads as edible decorations, and cooked down to paste for some very classic Chinese pastries.

Of course, before they are dried, they are first enjoyed fresh.

My husband's early childhood was spent in a traditional courtyard house in Beijing where two jujube trees flourished. They were planted by his grandmother, who took immense pride in these fruit trees.


The best jujubes in China are from Xinjiang in the northwest. [Photo provided to China Daily]

In spring, the trees would put out hundreds of tiny cream-colored flowers, insignificant and hard to spot among the lush new foliage. But in the still air of evening, they perfumed the courtyard, with a peculiar scent that would hint sweet fruit in a couple of months.

The spouse remembers the trees were too tall for the children to reach and when the fruits ripened, they had to wait for wind or rain to knock the jujubes down. Sometimes, an obliging adult would help.

The fresh fruits were crisp and sweet, and juicy enough. The harvested fruits always went back to grandma, who would portion out little bowls to each grandchild. The rest would be carefully dried in the sun and saved for cooking later.

The best jujubes in China are from Xinjiang in the northwest. The fruit here grow as large as eggs, compared to the thimble-sized jujubes from the rest of the country. Thanks to advanced logistics, these delicious jujubes are now available everywhere, and they are also exported to certain countries.


The best jujubes in China are from Xinjiang in the northwest. [Photo provided to China Daily]

They are large, green and speckled with red-brown blotches with a small sharp pointed kernel. They tend to be crisp but dry and as you chew on the flesh, it dissolves on the tongue and becomes slightly starchy.

It is precisely this starchiness that makes them so good when dried.

In Beijing, the jujubes are often candied, or air-dried to a crisp. They macerate the jujubes in ejiao, which is a traditional medicinal tonic made out of donkey glue.

Beijing's signature roast duck also depends on the jujube for authenticity. To qualify as the genuine article, the duck must be roasted in a wood-fired oven using only jujube wood. Jujube wood gives the duck its characteristic fruity smokiness, as well as its burnished deep maroon color.

Dried Chinese jujubes are considered a warming food, a natural tonic, and it is often used in sweet soups that nourish body and soul.

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2019-12-07 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Red dates and ginger drink]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/07/content_1465766.htm

Red dates and ginger drink. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Red dates and ginger drink

(This is the classic sweet soup that Chinese mothers feed their daughters every month. Good as a blood-booster.)

?20-30 Chinese jujubes, seeds removed

?4-5 thin slices fresh ginger

?Rock sugar, to taste

The seeds of the Chinese jujube are considered very heaty, so they are removed before cooking.

An easy way is to smash the dried fruit with the back of a cleaver and remove the seeds. Or, simply cut the fruit open and remove.

Place a liter of water in a pot and add the seeded jujubes and fresh ginger.

Allow the water to come to a boil first, then reduce to a simmer and cook for half an hour to 45 minutes.

The liquid will reduce by about half.

Add rock sugar to taste, and serve warm by the mug.


Watercress and red dates soup. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Watercress and red dates soup

This is a soup for the increasingly cold days. The watercress is a cooler, so jujubes are added to balance the effect.

?300 g pork ribs, cut small

?500 g watercress

?4-6 Chinese jujubes, seeds removed

?Salt, to taste

Blanch the ribs, then add to two liters water to start the stock. Let it simmer while you prepare the vegetables.

Wash the watercress and separate the leafy tops from the tough stems.

Bind the stems together and add to the simmering stock. Add the jujubes to the soup.

When the soup is flavorful, remove the watercress stems.

Bring the soup to a boil and drop in the reserved leafy tops. Season to taste.

Serve hot, with the watercress leaves and a couple pieces of ribs.

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2019-12-07 15:44:33
<![CDATA[Remains of earliest silk fabric found in Henan]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/09/content_1466065.htm

Relics found in Xingyang, a county-level city in Zhengzhou, Henan province, help to identify what is believed to be the world's oldest silk fabric.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Chinese archaeologists have used new technology to ascertain whether the remnants of carbonized textiles found in a burial urn unearthed at the Neolithic Yangshao Culture ruins in Central China's Henan province are the remains of the world's earliest known silk fabrics.

"With the help of the technology of enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed by experts at the China National Silk Museum, it has been confirmed that the carbonized fabrics taken from the urn coffin at the Wanggou site in Henan are silk fabrics," said Zhao Feng, curator of the museum, on Dec 2.

Gu Wanfa, director of the Zhengzhou Municipal Research Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology, says a cluster of the Yangshao Culture ruins dating back 5,000 to 7,000 years have been found in Henan. In addition to the silk fabrics at the Wanggou site, the same fabrics were unearthed at the Qingtai site and there are bone carvings of silkworms found at the Shuanghuaishu site. All provide solid evidence that proves the ancient Chinese began raising silkworms for silk production more than 5,000 years ago.

"The silk fabrics at the Wanggou date back to between 5,300 and 5,500 years. Previously, proven silk fabrics were unearthed at the Qianshanyang site of the Liangzhu Culture dating back to between 4,200 and 4,400 years," Gu says.

He says through electron microscopic observation, they found fine yarns in the silk fabrics woven using four-warp twisted rods.

The fabrics were put in the urns to wrap the bodies of the dead. At the Wanggou site, the silk remnant was found in the skull of a child. Gu says this suggests that at that time, China's silk technology had matured rather than just begun.

He says one of the fabrics was leno dyed before the weaving process-a method of cooking the silk developed to prevent the dye from fading.

Silk originated in China and later become one of the country's major trade items. However, previous technical means were not enough to detect the fiber material of the carbonized textiles to provide archaeological evidence of a silk's origin.

In 2010, the China National Silk Museum began key scientific research set up by the National Cultural Heritage Administration on the origin of silk.

"As the testing technology has become more cost-efficient, we will carry out extensive sample testing in the Yangshao Cultural ruins in Henan in order to map the origin and distribution of silk in this area," says Zhou Yang, director of the national silk research program.

The urn coffin found in Yangshao actually resembles the shape of a silkworm pupa, which might imply ancient worship, or wishing that the dead can be reborn as a silk moth after it breaks through the cocoon, says Zhao Feng.

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2019-12-09 08:52:15
<![CDATA[2019 Macao Light Festival held]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/02/content_1464918.htm

Light decorations brighten the 2019 Macao Light Festival in South China's Macao on Dec 1, 2019. A myriad of activities were staged at the event, including light sculpture performance, lighting installations and interactive games, allowing citizens and tourists to experience the joyous atmosphere for the upcoming 20th anniversary of Macao's return to China.[Photo/Xinhua]


Light decorations brighten the 2019 Macao Light Festival in South China's Macao on Dec 1, 2019. A myriad of activities were staged at the event, including light sculpture performance, lighting installations and interactive games, allowing citizens and tourists to experience the joyous atmosphere for the upcoming 20th anniversary of Macao's return to China.[Photo/Xinhua]


Light decorations brighten the 2019 Macao Light Festival in South China's Macao on Dec 1, 2019. A myriad of activities were staged at the event, including light sculpture performance, lighting installations and interactive games, allowing citizens and tourists to experience the joyous atmosphere for the upcoming 20th anniversary of Macao's return to China.[Photo/Xinhua]


Light decorations brighten the 2019 Macao Light Festival in South China's Macao on Dec 1, 2019. A myriad of activities were staged at the event, including light sculpture performance, lighting installations and interactive games, allowing citizens and tourists to experience the joyous atmosphere for the upcoming 20th anniversary of Macao's return to China.[Photo/Xinhua]


Light decorations brighten the 2019 Macao Light Festival in South China's Macao on Dec 1, 2019. A myriad of activities were staged at the event, including light sculpture performance, lighting installations and interactive games, allowing citizens and tourists to experience the joyous atmosphere for the upcoming 20th anniversary of Macao's return to China.[Photo/Xinhua]


Light decorations brighten the 2019 Macao Light Festival in South China's Macao on Dec 1, 2019. A myriad of activities were staged at the event, including light sculpture performance, lighting installations and interactive games, allowing citizens and tourists to experience the joyous atmosphere for the upcoming 20th anniversary of Macao's return to China.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2019-12-02 14:29:14
<![CDATA[Sichuan holds international theater festival]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-12/02/content_1464916.htm

A performer in traditional Yi ethnic costumes. [Photo provided to China Daily]

When most cities in northern China are shivering in winter cold, Xichang, a city in southwestern Sichuan province, is recording temperature of up to 23 C in November.

It is perhaps fitting that the city decided to hold the Daliangshan International Theatre Festival, the first such event in the world to be held in winter, with some performances held outdoors.

Initiated by 23 artists including actor Pu Cunxin, Yi ethnic poet Jidi Majia, musician Liao Changyong and novelist A Lai, the festival ran from Nov 19 to Dec 1.

Local organizers said the festival exemplifies the city's effort to explore the new economic development model via blending culture and tourism.


Pu Cunxin, one of the Daliangshan International Theater Festival initiators. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Drawing performers from eight countries, the festival staged around 300 shows in more than 30 theaters as well as held a string of forums, seminars and workshops.

Besides, the festival used local natural attractions, boasting picturesque mountains and lakes, to be part of the shows' stages. 

As Xichang is the capital of Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture, home to the largest population of Yi people in China, the festival has a special part to interweave Yi ethnic culture with some theater plays, making it one of the highlights.

Pu, one of the festival's initiators, said the festival has raised the city's brand name by drawing a number of theater play enthusiasts.


A performer at the Daliangshan theater festival. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Artists at the Daliangshan International Theater Festival. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-12-02 10:20:01
<![CDATA[Shall we dance?]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/25/content_1464914.htm

Anamorphic Skull (2019) [Photo/Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner]

Carol Bove's work beguiles and beautifies in material juxtapositions and unexpected nuances at David Zwirner in Hong Kong.

If female artists have struggled to wrest the spotlight from their male peers, consider the lot of Carol Bove (pronounced "bo-vay"), who makes heavy, intense sculptures forged out of stainless steel in a Brooklyn-based studio, which she then crushes and paints in vibrant colors, resulting in an elegant, fabric-like finish. Such is the challenge of this modern-day Her-phaestus, whose inaugural Asia show Ten Hours (until December 14 at David Zwirner at H Queen's in Hong Kong) is attracting conspicuous buzz.

Bove's trajectory has been steep since emerging in the early 2000s, exhibiting at many of the world's major institutions and prominently featuring in both the 2019 and 2017 Venice Biennales. She's collected by culture vultures such as Adrian Cheng; the New World Development executive vice-chairman has one of Bove's works displayed at his K11 Musea art/retail mall in Tsim Sha Tsui.

 

 


La Luce (2019) [Photo/Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner]

The surface tension and ugly/beauty trickery Bove invokes and subverts is much of her appeal. To witness her hulking works in the flesh ?or, rather, metal ?is a revelation. The nuanced, poetic and feminine qualities of her sculpture stand in stark contrast to the labour-intensive circumstances of their production.

"One thing about these works is that they contain a lot of force," says Bove, who chooses her words with care, as if executing dance steps. "But the resulting power you see can be very tender. I want the touch to appear very light and soft."


The First Braid (2019) [Photo/Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner]

One such piece is the powerful, large-scale sculpture Offenbach Barcarolle (2019), the title of which refers to Jacques Offenbach's final opera, The Tales of Hoffmann (1881). It espouses material and visual alchemy; what appears as awkward, bulky contradiction on cursory glance soon softens, succumbs and attains musicality, dance or even romance.

"I think about a viewer's progression through the space," says Bove. "You enact a certain dance as the views unfold in a particular sequence. I try to anticipate these sequences and play with them so that there are reveals and surprises, encouraging the viewer to stand in different parts of the room and feel the space in different ways." Such is the way of Bove, where finding the space, and the art, is a way of opening up the world.


Part of Carol Bove's Hong Kong show at David Zwirner. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2019-11-25 10:37:56
<![CDATA[International puppet show opens in East China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/25/content_1463192.htm

[Photo/Xinhua]

Over the next four days, 28 puppetry groups from 11 countries and regions will perform in Quanzhou, a city famous for puppetry, in East China's Fujian province.

At the opening ceremony of the Sixth China Quanzhou International Puppet Show Saturday, puppet masters from Russia, Hungary, the Republic of Korea, Switzerland, India and Italy, together with Chinese puppeteers, entertained and amazed their audiences with various hand puppets, rod puppets and marionettes.

"It was a visual feast," said Rob Bloemkolk, a Dutch writer, producer and director. He and his puppeteer wife have visited many Chinese cities but the festival still offered something new. He was in awe of the "big group of Chinese performers and their puppets with changing faces," referencing a traditional Sichuan Opera performance and its rapid-fire mask changes.

Traditional Chinese puppet shows use dance, music and other art forms together, in "a more integrated way than European puppetry companies," according to Bloemkolk.


[Photo/Xinhua]

Sun Chen-chieh, head of a Taiwan puppet troupe, was impressed by Western performers' approach to puppetry. "They are more innovative using newer materials and performing styles than Chinese puppeteers," said Sun.

Sun's group has prepared a performance with paper puppets. "Actors will use just two pieces of paper to play different puppet roles on the stage," he said.

Due to puppetry's universal appeal, language was not a barrier for those in attendance. Audiences at the festival were in fits of laughter and gave standing ovations on Saturday.

Besides theaters, the visiting puppeteers will also visit local schools.


[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2019-11-25 10:15:45
<![CDATA[Rare Qing Dynasty enamel bowl auctioned for HK$87.2mln]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/28/content_1464078.htm

A Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) enameled "falangcai" bowl was auctioned for 87.2 million HK dollars ($11.1 million) due to its superb craftsmanship at the Christie's sale in Hong Kong on November 27, 2019. [Photo/China News Service]

This exquisite imperial bowl represents the pinnacle of falangcai art during the Kangxi period. The Kangxi Emperor's dream of perfecting local production of painted enamels achieved extraordinary realisation with this exceptional and unique "double lotus" bowl. From its shape, enamelling and decoration, the current bowl was made towards the end of the Kangxi reign, possibly in his last year in 1722, the period when falangcai production reached its perfection.


A Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) enameled "falangcai" bowl was auctioned for 87.2 million HK dollars due to its superb craftsmanship at the Christie's sale in Hong Kong on November 27, 2019. [Photo/China News Service]


A Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) enameled "falangcai" bowl was auctioned for 87.2 million HK dollars due to its superb craftsmanship at the Christie's sale in Hong Kong on November 27, 2019. [Photo/China News Service]

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2019-11-28 14:06:03
<![CDATA[Millennium-old folk art attracts new following]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/28/content_1464076.htm

Neo-nianhua works, jointly created by young designers and nianhua artisans, were on display side-by-side with traditional nianhua pieces during the Conference on Nianhua's Inheritance and Development, held from Nov 23-24 in Weifang, East China's Shandong province. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Zhong Xinglin made a hard decision in early 2017?to quit working as a local news correspondent for the web edition of the People's Daily in Central China's Hunan province.

Truly taking pride in her six-year stint at the influential media website, however, Zhong, was beckoned by her true calling to join her father's endeavor to revive nianhua.

Nianhua, aka Chinese New Year pictures, are a type of chromatic woodblock prints that boast a long history dating back to the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 24).

Zhong's family has been engaged in the nianhua-making business for more than a century.

However, "as Chinese society evolves at breakneck speed, nianhua, a typical token of a traditional way of life, is losing ground in contemporary life. Now it's my turn to keep the old art and craft thriving in the 21st century," Zhong told the audience at the opening ceremony of a conference on Chinese New Year pictures' inheritance and development, held from Nov 23-24 in Weifang, East China's Shandong province.


Journalist-turned nianhua artisan Zhong Xinglin has managed to catapult the lesser-known Tantou nianhua to stardom among young consumers across China. She was invited to share her success story at the opening ceremony of the conference on nianhua's inheritance and development held from Nov 23-24 in Weifang, East China's Shandong province. She is widely deemed both an outstanding younger-generation inheritor of the intangible cultural heritage and a shrewd entrepreneur in China's fledgling cultural and creative industry. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Apart from honing her nianhua-making skills, the media-savvy artisan has since catapulted Tantou nianhua, a variety of the famed Chinese intangible cultural heritage in her home province of Hunan, to stardom among young consumers across the country.

Both traditional products and modern spinoffs from the Zhong family's nianhua studio have been selling like hot cakes on social media, such as WeChat and TikTok.

"A steadily-growing number of followers are not only willing to buy Tantou nianhua products but also to learn nianhua-making skills. For me, that is very encouraging," said Zhong. "I am very optimistic about the future of nianhua."

Tai Liping, a veteran nianhua artisan from Baoji, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, echoed Zhong's optimism at the seminar on nianhua creation and innovation.


A pair of door gods, typical of the traditional Tantou nianhua style, is a highly-respected cultural heritage in Tantou township, Longhui county, Central China's Hunan province. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"I firmly believe that nianhua will enjoy a rebirth, gaining a foothold in contemporary life," said the 68-year-old master, a national-level nianhua inheritor, better known as a guardian of Fengxiang nianhua, a local variety of the Chinese New Year woodblock prints in Shaanxi.

Tai's family has been practicing the folk art since the early Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). As the only surviving 20th-generation inheritor of the art and craft, Tai has spent decades re-creating hundreds of traditional nianhua woodblocks, strictly in accordance with vintage New Year prints he found.

"Inheritance comes before innovation. It is my mission in life to rescue and recover traditional motifs, patterns and techniques. I am not interested in innovation. I'd rather leave it to young people," Tai said.

But Tai is happy to see that his son Tai Gaoyang, daughter-in-law Wang Yixuan, and daughter Tai Gaodi, have all joined in to promote nianhua.

Gaoyang and Yixuan concentrate on creating new products based on traditional nianhua motifs, and then market and sell them through e-commerce and social media platforms.


A piece of Neo-nianhua works, jointly created by young designers and nianhua artisans, is on display side-by-side with traditional nianhua pieces at the Conference on Nianhua's Inheritance and Development on Nov 24 in Weifang, East China's Shandong province. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Meanwhile, Tai Gaodi, a nianhua researcher with the Chinese National Academy of Arts, is busying herself building up the nation's most inclusive nianhua database for academic and educational use.

Young designers, too, are making immense contributions to the revival of nianhua, said Wang Jian, a mass media researcher with Nanjing University, at the seminar on nianhua's new applications.

They have teamed up with nianhua artisans to create the so-called Neo-nianhua works and nianhua spinoffs, such as mouse pads, scarves, T-shirts, pillows, bags, stickers, calendars, and smart phone cases, he explained.

"These novel products are usually characterized by common scenes from daily life, and they have easily become an integral part of contemporary life,?said Wang.

People of different ages and from different areas are making joint efforts to revive nianhua. "Most importantly, more and more young people are engaging themselves in the creation and promotion of nianhua and as such, have injected new life into the millennium-old folk art," said Chang Huixue, managing director of wodsy.com, at the nianhua conference.


Nianhua-themed gift stores at the Shihu Cultural Heritages Zone are must-go destinations for visitors to Weifang, East China's Shandong province, the home to both Chinese kites and Yangjiabu nianhua works. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Affiliated with the China Cultural Media Group Co Ltd, wodsy.com is a portal specialized in promoting traditional Chinese skills and crafts, and a key co-organizer of the conference.

Themed New Nianhua, New Life, the two-day event drew at least 300 officials, artisans, designers, researchers, and marketing and sales specialists from across China.

The conference featured three seminars on nianhua's creation and innovation, mass communication, and integration into contemporary life, a preparatory meeting attended by the founding members of the Chinese New Year Woodblock Prints Inheritance and Development Alliance, and a grand exhibition of traditional Chinese New Year Woodblock prints, neo-nianhua works and nianhua spinoffs from the hands of artisans and designers from different parts of the country.

The conference also unveiled a year-long campaign, supported by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, to raise public awareness of cultural heritage in 2020 by publicizing master craftsmen, holding nianhua-making workshops, art fairs, and mounting nianhua exhibition tours around the nation.


Drawing inspiration from traditional nianhua motifs, young designers have created popular items for daily use, such as mouse pads, bags, money holders, mugs, stickers and cases for smartphones. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Nianhua artisan Zhong Xinglin introduces the traditional Chinese cultural heritage to a young woman during her visit to Warsaw in the summer of 2018. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


This Tantou nianhua work, depicting personified mice and symbolizing wealth and happiness, is soon to hit the market as the Chinese lunar year of the mouse will arrive in less than two months. It was shown during the conference on nianhua's inheritance and development, held from Nov 23-24 in Weifang, East China's Shandong province. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Xinghuozhe, a traditional Chinese equivalent of Zippo, sells like hot cakes on China's e-commerce and social media platforms. Young designers from the Gao Lamei Nianhua Studio have re-designed the traditional gadget, adding a USB interface, a rechargeable battery, and replacing the bamboo-made, cylinder-shaped case with one made of red sandalwood with carved images of the fortune gods, commonly seen in Tantou nianhua works from Central China's Hunan province. [Photo by Zhong Xinglin/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-11-28 10:20:15
<![CDATA[Israeli artists exhibit artworks portraying China's Gansu province]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/28/content_1463804.htm JERUSALEM, Nov. 27 (Xinhua) -- Three Israeli artists exhibited their artworks portraying China's northwestern Gansu province on Wednesday evening at the China Cultural Center in Tel Aviv.

This exhibition, titled "This Magical Thread," displayed some of the fruits of these artists' journey to the province where they spent about two weeks, including painting, photo and sculpture artworks.

"The works in the exhibition try to capture moments and impressions from that unforgettable journey and reflect the artistic style of each artist," said Iris Mendel, curator of the exhibition, who travelled to Gansu together with the three artists in July this year.

According to Mendel, it was the first time for all of them to visit China and also to Gansu. In their eyes, this journey was a unique and unforgettable journey and they really hoped for another visit to the province to create more artworks.

Starting the journey in Lanzhou, capital city of Gansu, they headed north to Zhangye and Dunhuang, visiting temples, the ancient Silk Road, the Chinese wall and art centers both ancient and contemporary, said Mendel.

Gabriella Klein displayed a Chinese ink painting, with a size of about three meters high and more than five meters wide. It consists of five sheets of paper and resembles the Chinese scrolls.

The monumental figure Klein painted in ink is reclining Buddha statues, half awake and half sleepy, in particular the statues she saw in Zhangye, a city in Gansu province, said Klein.

Lea Avital presented two artworks. A hanged sculpture combines a two-dimensional drawing and a three dimensional object. The red flame drawing is created like the brush stroke of a calligraphy painting.

This artwork entails more contradictions, old and new, manual and industrial, tradition and the feeling of renewal, said Avital.

Photos displayed in the exhibition and taken by Israeli photographer Gustavo Sagorsky focus mainly on Chinese people of different ages, roles and identities whom he saw in the journey.

Sagorsky said he was expecting to visit Gansu again and had the dream of publishing a photograph album reflecting the diverse society of Gansu.

This journey was organized by the China Cultural Center in Tel Aviv and the Gansu Provincial Department of Culture and Tourism.

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2019-11-28 09:13:52
<![CDATA[Kung Fu Panda theme park to open at Universal Beijing Reseort in 2021]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/27/content_1463600.htm

Universal Beijing Resort, which is expected to open in 2021, unveiled a Chinese-language short video about its Kung Fu Panda Land of Awesomeness.

It will be the world's first theme park land based on the animated movie series Kung Fu Panda, bringing to life Kung Fu Panda with Chinese architecture, festive decor and excellent performances. The Hollywood blockbuster follows the exploits of the brave panda, Po, who wants to be a Kung Fu master.

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2019-11-27 09:47:16
<![CDATA[Musical 'Matilda' tours China]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/26/content_1463449.htm

Inspired by the beloved book by British novelist Roald Dahl (1916-90), the musical Matilda, by the Royal Shakespeare Company, launched its first tour in China, which started in July and will continue until January.

Kicked off in Dongguan, South China's Guangdong province, the tour includes 13 Chinese cities, including Changsha in Central China's Hunan province; Wuhan in Central China's Hubei province; Shanghai, and Nanjing in East China's Jiangsu province.

Matilda opened Thursday in Beijing and runs through Sunday.

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2019-11-26 15:25:47
<![CDATA[Artists display 78 fiber art works in Hangzhou]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/27/content_1463678.htm

People are appreciating the fiber art work The Door.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The third Hangzhou Fiber Art Triennial opened in Hangzhou on November 26, 2019. Seventy-eight fiber art works from 40 artists (groups) from 18 countries and regions are showcased at three venues in Zhejiang Art Museum, China Academy of Art Art Museum and China National Silk Museum, Hangzhou.


People are appreciating the fiber art work  State Registration.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work  Elegy.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work  Look, God is watching us.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work  Collapse.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work  Land.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work  Theory and Practice.  [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work  Commune.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


People are appreciating the fiber art work Hand in Hand.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2019-11-27 15:56:01
<![CDATA[Ballet troupe debuts adaptation of classic love story]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/22/content_1462568.htm

Scenes from the Shanghai Ballet's new production The Lady of the Camellias. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The city's renowned dance company hopes their new production Lady of the Camellias can be one that lives on for the ages, Zhang Kun reports.

The Shanghai Ballet's new production The Lady of the Camellias premiered at the SAIC Shanghai Culture Square on Saturday, winning praise from several industry experts.

Zhao Ruheng, the former director of the National Ballet of China, praised the performance of the ballerinas and their understanding of theater.

"I have been following the news about the Shanghai Ballet," Zhao says. "This is a professional company who don't just show off their dance techniques, but also reach for further artistic expression and excellence.

"I see the whole company continuously pushing forward. I've watched some of the kids there grow from one competition to the next. They have developed so rapidly that I can hardly keep track."

Zhao also singled out lead ballerina Qi Bingxue as one of the dancers who impressed her the most, saying the ballerina has improved tremendously since she first saw her perform at the third Beijing International Ballet Competition in 2015.


Scenes from the Shanghai Ballet's new production The Lady of the Camellias. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Created by British choreographer Derek Deane and based on the novel by French author Alexandre Dumas (1824-1895), the ballet was part of the program at the China Shanghai International Arts Festival.

The Lady of the Camellias has been a popular subject for theater since it debuted in 1848. Dumas was the first to adapt the story for the stage in Paris in 1852. Following its success, composer Giuseppe Verdi put the story to music, creating the opera La traviata, in which the heroine's name changed from Marguerite Gautier to Violetta Valery.

"Every ballet company dreams about staging its own version of this literary classic, and we wanted to create a fine production that stands out from others, one that can live on the stage for a very long time," says Xin Lili, head of the company.


The lead role of Marguerite is played by Qi Bingxue, while Wu Husheng plays Armand. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Two more performances of the new production will take place at the Shanghai International Dance Center on Nov 29 and Dec 1. The ballet is also scheduled to tour Australia in April before its appearance at the National Center for Performing Arts in Beijing in June. There will be 30 shows staged during its global tour.

"We will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Shanghai Ballet next year. We hope Camellias will be a new addition to our repertoire, which represents the artistry and professional level of a company in the global dance community," says Xin.

Playing the lead role of Marguerite, a courtesan who falls in love with Armand, a young bourgeois, Qi says preparation for the role proved challenging.

"I put a lot of effort into relating to the character. There is so much going on in her mind that it was difficult for me to catch. I tried to understand her better by reading the book and watching film adaptations," says the 23-year-old.

On the other hand, Wu Husheng, the lead dancer with the Shanghai Ballet who played Armand, says playing the role was an enjoyable and relaxing experience.


Scenes from the Shanghai Ballet's new production The Lady of the Camellias. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"I just wanted to give the audiences my best performance when the curtains came up for one of the last shows of the China Shanghai International Arts Festival. I am glad I did it," said Wu, who performed despite hurting his lower back just two days before the premiere.

"These sudden injuries are hard to avoid, because we are dancing on a daily basis," he says, adding that Qi, who he frequently plays pas de deux with, was instrumental in helping him to ensure the performance went smoothly.

Deane, the 66-year-old acclaimed British dancer and choreographer who has in the past 14 years created six productions with the Shanghai Ballet, explained his approach to portraying Marguerite in the production.

"I was intrigued by all the characters, especially Marguerite. She is a complicated character and I thought that it was important to bring out her many facets, including her calculating and fickle side. She understands love is one thing and survival is another," he says.


Scenes from the Shanghai Ballet's new production The Lady of the Camellias. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"I tried to put her life into different compartments. On one hand, she enjoys having all those men around her and being rich, but on the other hand, her love for Armand brings out a different side of her purity and virtues."

The Lady of the Camellias has been adapted several times for the ballet theater since the 1920s. Two previous productions, one by maestro choreographer John Neumeier and another by Val Caniparoli, used music by Frederic Chopin. Deane, however, chose to have American composer Carl Davis create new music for the ballet production.


Scenes from the Shanghai Ballet's new production The Lady of the Camellias. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Michael England, who conducted the orchestra of the Shanghai Opera House for the musical accompaniment to Camellias, described Davis as a talented music composer who was suited for the job. Davis previously composed music for films such as The French Lieutenant's Woman, The Great Gatsby and several BBC drama series.

"In his music, there are lots of emotions to capture: love, anguish, anger, with cinematic elements that can quickly shift to different aspects of the story," says England.

Contact the writer at zhangkun@chinadaily.com.cn

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2019-11-22 07:42:15
<![CDATA[24 Solar Terms: 7 things you may not know about Minor Snow]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/22/content_1462566.htm

[file photo]

The traditional Chinese lunar calendar divides the year into 24 solar terms. Minor Snow, (Chinese: 小雪), the 20th solar term of the year, begins this year on Nov 22 and ends on Dec 6.

Minor Snow refers to the time when it starts to snow, mostly in China's northern areas, and the temperature continues to drop.

Here are seven things you should know about Minor Snow.

Light snow

An ancient Chinese book about plants explains that "in Minor Snow, the weather is cold and it is going to snow, while the earth is not frozen enough and the snow is light." The temperature in most areas in the north drops to zero degrees and below. Meanwhile, in the lower and middle reaches of the Yellow River, the average time of the first snow falls during the Minor Snow solar term. The snow is light and frozen at night, but melts quickly during the day.


[file photo]

Wearing hats and scarves

In China, starting in Minor Snow, the wind blows from the northeast a lot. Because it's still not bitterly cold, many people do not wear hats or scarves yet. In fact, according to an old Chinese saying, "the head is the place where all passages of the body gather". It's sensible to keep one's head warm.


Chicken soup.[file photo]

Drinking soup

During Minor Snow, indoor heating begins to work, which means the air indoors is dry and most people might find their nose and mouth feels a bit dry. According to practices in traditional Chinese medicine, this accumulation of "inner heat" in one's body can cause problems, including oral ulcers and breakouts. The solution is to drink more hot soup, such as cabbage and bean curd soup, spinach and bean curd soup, and mutton and radish soup.


A woman paints on glutinous rice cakes in Quanzhou county, Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, in Dec 2012. [Photo by Wang Zichuang/asianewsphoto.com]

Eating glutinous rice cake

In some areas of South China, people have glutinous rice cakes around Minor Snow. In ancient times, glutinous rice cakes were a traditional festival offering to the bull god.


Preserved pork.[file photo]

Making preserved pork

After Minor Snow, the temperature declines sharply and the air becomes dry. It is the best time to start making preserved pork, which by the Chinese Spring Festival would be ready to enjoy. In the past, when storage conditions were poor, people developed many ways to store food and preserved pork is one such example. So even in the bitter winter, the whole family could enjoy meat. Some even say preserved pork tastes more delicious than fresh meat.


A dish made with pickled vegetables.[file photo]

Making pickled vegetables

For thousands of years, the people of Nanjing, Jiangsu province, have welcomed Minor Snow with pickled vegetables made in different ways.

Nanjing is known for its pickled vegetables. In the past, due to inconvenient transportation, vegetables sold in Nanjing were few and expensive. Thus people there made pickled vegetables for the winter.


[Photo/Xinhua]

Avoiding spicy food

On cold days, people may crave some hot and spicy food to keep warm. Experts say it's wise not to eat overly spicy food, since that will increase your inner heat.

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2019-11-22 07:00:00
<![CDATA[Museum shows culture of Shui people]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/19/content_1462109.htm

A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]


A museum dedicated to the Sui ethnic group in Sandu Sui autonomous county, Guizhou province, Nov 16, 2019. The museum's collections introduce the culture, history and social customs of the Shui people. [Photo/China News Service]

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2019-11-19 14:48:41
<![CDATA[Highlights of 6th China International Circus Festival in Zhuhai]]> http://www.jhhengtai.com/2019-11/19/content_1462107.htm

People take photos of the opening ceremony of the 6th China International Circus Festival in Zhuhai, south China's Guangdong Province, Nov. 16, 2019. The circus festival was held in Zhuhai from Nov. 16 to 23.[Photo/Xinhua]


Acrobats perform at the opening ceremony of the 6th China International Circus Festival in Zhuhai, south China's Guangdong Province, Nov. 16, 2019. The circus festival was held in Zhuhai from Nov. 16 to 23.[Photo/Xinhua]